Ian Dees's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2017

Favorite proposals for this user

* #pdxtech The Shadow World of Portland tech

A panel of #pdxtech irc community members giving their take on the Portland tech scene
Culture 2017-03-07 22:29:05 +0000
Tyler Gillies

* 24 Hours of Awesome: Science Hack Day Portland

Science Hack Day is a free-to-attend, open-source, worldwide, volunteer-organized event aimed at bringing together scientists, developers, engineers, students, and anyone else passionate or curious about science. The goal is simple: in 24 hours form a team and make something (fun, useful, nonsensical, anything!) with science. Hear from the organizers of the first Science Hack Day in Portland on how it was put together, just how awesome it was, and how open (science, source, hardware, web) played a vital part.
Culture 2017-03-31 17:43:41 +0000
Jessica Hardwicke, Lilly Winfree

* Advanced filtering on your API endpoints with SQLAlchemy and FIQL

How robust is the filtering of your API? Let's delve into how a string of text can become a set of instructions to the API on exactly what records should be returned.
Practice 2017-03-15 17:08:07 +0000
Serge Domkowski

* Archetypal Ballers and Ternary Plots - Visualizing NBA Skills for Fun and Profit

Basketball is second only to baseball in its rich variety of detailed data and analysis techniques. This project uses two techniques to reduce this complexity. The first, archetypal analysis, is an unsupervised learning technique that reduces the 18-dimensional box scores to a three-dimensional vector. The second, ternary plots, provides an elegant visualization for comparing players and teams. Using these techniques, I'll review the 2016 - 2017 NBA season.
Theory 2017-03-29 21:44:54 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* Be(come) a Mentor! Help Others Succeed!

There is always something new to learn in technology. We are always experts in one and beginners in another field. In order to learn successfully it’s important to have a mentor but it’s equally important to learn how to be a good mentor.
Practice 2017-03-22 11:07:03 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Become a Rocket Scientist With Open Source

The new space industry is expanding rapidly, with huge opportunities for open-source contributions. This talk focuses on the case study of Asterank, software that makes space data easier to access and explore. Its analysis and visualization tools have been used in government, private industry, and schools. The project has made public space data more open and usable for millions of people.
Hacks 2017-03-17 19:14:05 +0000
Ian Webster

* Capturing Tiny Snakes

This is intended as a tutorial session for bringing up MicroPython on a common, and reasonably easy to obtain, microcontroller platform. From bare bones, to blinking LEDs and beyond.
Hacks 2017-04-10 04:54:14 +0000
John Hawley, Terri Oda

* Containers: A Guide for the Perplexed

WTF are containers anyway? And what aren't they? And what is all this other ... stuff? Come find out.
Theory 2017-03-28 18:13:31 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Create your own type system in 45 minutes

Don't let programming language designers have all the fun: you can design your own type system that is better than the current one.
Theory 2017-04-01 05:08:13 +0000
Michael Ernst

* Customize the Ubuntu Desktop: Hacks, Apps and Snaps.

Do you use Ubuntu on your desktop, and want to make the desktop even more exciting? This talk will go over the basic ways to add additional features to the desktop, as well as showcase the current set of features you can utilize that will enhance the desktop you use daily!
Hacks 2017-04-02 03:38:16 +0000
Philip Ballew

* Debug Better: 2017 Edition

Debugging: the schedule destroyer, the confidence sapper, the mire in which thousands of working hours are lost every day. It’s time to stop staring at those four lines of code, desperately willing the solution to appear. This session is about the strategies that will steer you around bugs, tactics for dealing with them, and tools that can shorten a four-hour debugging session to five minutes.
Theory 2017-04-10 00:46:51 +0000
Yoz Grahame

* Decoding the history of codes

The word "code" means different things to different people. In this talk, we explore cryptography and how it's evolved over time. We look at some key historical events and see how the art of encryption affected our lives.
Theory 2017-03-22 02:51:15 +0000
Niharika Kohli

* Digital Activism at Government Scale

Government is huge, slow, and wasteful. You try to use its services, but they’re not doing what they were meant to. _You know_ how to make broken systems work. Join government to solve problems for everyone. … especially under an Administration you oppose.
Activism 2017-04-01 06:37:15 +0000
Yoz Grahame

* Effective Presentations Using Applied Logical Fallacies

For many novice speakers, especially technical speakers, the hardest part of presenting is not figuring out what to put in but what to leave out. But what works for an academic paper doesn't work in a 10 minute presentation, and you risk boring your audience long before you manage to convince them of anything. This talk is intended to be a fun (and perhaps a bit silly) look at the science and the art of being convincing. I will cover how logical fallacies are used in propaganda, lying, and how you can use them to get your point across quickly. And don't worry, we'll also talk about how to do this ethically!
Practice 2017-04-10 04:52:02 +0000
Terri Oda

* Emacs's org-mode: a writing and organizing multitool

This talk will present org-mode, a package for the emacs editor, as a tool useful for everything from writing talks, to keeping a journal, organizing your todos, and developing literate code
Hacks 2017-03-31 19:09:47 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Failing Well

It's a fact of life--software breaks. But all is not doom and gloom. How we detect and handle errors drastically impacts the quality of both our systems and our lives. Knowing what to track, when to page, and how to find system weaknesses is critical.
Practice 2017-03-31 17:30:23 +0000
Jason Clark

* Falsehoods Programmers Believe About (Human) Languages - Common pitfalls in interface translation

Making open source software translatable is easy, right? You just take out all the strings, put them in a translation file in your git repository, and start accepting pull requests. Simple! Well, not so fast. There’s a lot more to this than meets the eye, and if you take a quick and dirty approach you’ll end up with upset translators, complaints from users, and mysteries like “what is ١٢٬٣٤٥٬٦٧٨ and why does my code want to parse that as a number?”. Thankfully, there are open source resources and libraries that can take care of these things for you.
Practice 2017-04-01 04:17:21 +0000
Roan Kattouw

* FOSS it up, with women !

According to a recent survey by Toptotal, only 11% of open-source participants, developers & ideators are women. Come on, let's blot out this disconcerting disparity ! Get introduced to the world of open source, and the vast range of opportunities ranging from coding to documentation, design, outreach and research. Budding developers, let's aspire to get inspired & know about more women who’ve made significant contributions to technology
Culture 2017-04-09 18:12:22 +0000
Jigyasa Grover

* Geek Choir

In this session, we explore ways to improve team cohesion, cooperation, connection, and presence for each other via song.
Culture 2017-04-01 04:39:32 +0000
Michael Alan Brewer

* Getting to 0.1.0: Build Management for Your Personal Project

There's a lot that goes into a great open-source repository besides the code. How do you make your project easy for a newcomer to understand? What about easy to install, to test, and to contribute to? Big projects have whole teams dedicated to building robust releases, but you're just a solo dev with a dream. Great news! You don't have to put your project on hold to study build engineering. Come learn a few simple tools that will put some professional polish on your personal project.
Practice 2017-03-27 11:23:14 +0000
Finn Ellis

* Hi! It takes more than engineering skills to make your company successful. Let's talk about it.

Let's be real: tech companies value engineering skills over most other skills, and it shows in both salaries and decisionmaking. This talk is about why this happens, why it's problematic, and how we can refocus importance on all the skills that make companies successful.
Culture 2017-04-07 22:38:04 +0000
Lyzi Diamond

* How does a Computer _Really_ Work?

By thinking and exploring how to _program_ a simple computer, we learn how to _think_ like a computer, and this may help us become better programmers.
Hacks 2017-03-31 23:48:41 +0000
Howard Abrams

* How Open Source Audiovisual Tools Help Archivists (And You Too!)

This talk will hype several "homemade" open source video tools specific to the audiovisual digital preservation field built on broadly-used existing open source tools such as FFmpeg and mediainfo. We will discuss how these communities have grown to benefit the field of archiving and how we've grown to be able to give back to the main communities.
Practice 2017-03-27 19:25:32 +0000
Ashley Blewer, Andrew Weaver

* How to load 1m lines of Ruby in 5s

How do you load code faster? Load less of it! I'll talk about how we used static analysis and aggressive refactoring to reduce the time to reload code after a change by 85%.
Hacks 2017-03-29 17:00:35 +0000
Paul Tarjan

* How To Mentor Humans

I feel passionately that women and epecially minority women in tech need mentors and that those already in tech have a duty to step up for them, even though it means getting out of their comfort zone. How do you mentor minorities? How do you mentor anyone? With kindness and respect.
Culture 2017-03-30 00:04:26 +0000
Letta Raven

* How to Pay People for Their Work

Paying people for their work is radical, whether we're talking about open source contributions, second-shift diversity work, or even care at home. But giving people the resources necessary to make these community contributions is the only way to make our communities more sustainable.
Culture 2017-03-31 05:33:20 +0000
Thursday Bram

* I Have ADD and So Can -- Ooh, Shiny!

Neurodiversity is the hidden diversity on our teams. Unlike obvious external markers, mental and personality quirks or invisible disabilities are not always easy for us to remember or adjust for. But sometimes diversity in this area is as important as any other.
Culture 2017-04-01 02:00:17 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* In 1968 Mom built a computer: women's routes as technologists

On the surface, this story shares vignettes about my Mom. But its purpose is to increase awareness of human resources in technology, and overlooked pathways of young technologiests. "c. 1973 RCA hired her for the chip prototyping lab. Her new co-workers compared each other's crochet at lunch. A marathon week of late-night needlework bought her acceptance and promotion to supervisor. She told me stories about the ladies who wrapped wires for NASA a few years before, about women's centuries of fingers in technical fiber-crafts finally being noticed when it put men on the moon."
Culture 2017-04-01 05:15:03 +0000
Katheryn Sutter

* In pursuit of happy coding

This talk is about text editors, IDEs and their evolution through the time. What does the modern day programmer prefer, the IDEs or the text editors? Also we will try to settle the war b/w 2 of the longest-lived applications, vi & emacs. Also you will hear about my favourite text editor.
Practice 2017-04-09 18:03:45 +0000
Rishi Jain

* Introduction to Julia Programming

Would you like to learn a new programming language and some basketball analytics? Julia is the latest in a long line of programming languages designed for scientific computing. In Part 1 of this introduction, I'll go over the basic concepts of scientific computing and Julia. In Part 2, I'll show you how to apply these concepts and Julia to basketball analytics, using data freely available on the web.
Practice 2017-03-21 01:31:36 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* Keeping Application Support Human

You’ve built it, now you need to keep your users happy. Doing this without sacrificing your own happiness, and those of your teammates, takes planning. The intersection of monitoring and bother-the-humans is central to team happiness. We will go over this intersection and provide ways to navigate this humanely, and make your users happy.
Practice 2017-03-28 14:42:47 +0000
Jamie Riedesel

* Keeping Secrets On Remote Machines

Conventional wisdom says that using the cloud means giving up privacy and control. But maybe crypto is actually literally magic and we can have our cake and eat it too? We're mostly not there yet, but let's talk about some of the ways that we're getting close.
Theory 2017-04-01 01:25:22 +0000
Erica Portnoy

* Learn the lambda calculus and be a better programmer

Come learn an ancient model of pen & paper programming in order to change how you think about code
Theory 2017-03-31 18:36:41 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Learn to Type at 250 WPM Using Open Source Tools

The Open Steno Project is dedicated to the creation of open source software, hardware, and educational materials to bring machine stenography to the masses! Want to be a speed demon typist like the court reporters you see in movies? Now you can!
Practice 2017-03-31 23:50:35 +0000
Josh Lifton

* Magic, myth and the devops

Effective DevOps through collaboration and story telling.
Culture 2017-04-10 05:15:41 +0000
Jennifer Davis

* Making your app Password-Free

Learn how to make security easy by eliminating passwords for your app entirely with magic link based authentication!
Practice 2017-03-31 16:30:16 +0000
Eric Mann

* Mapbox GL: A modern, robust, open source map renderer on web and mobile

Come learn about the open source Mapbox GL native and web map renderer, how it is designed, the open specs on which it is built, and how to use it in your projects.
Practice 2017-03-28 18:02:52 +0000
Justin Miller

* Modern Keyboarding: How to Design, Build, and Hack

See how easy and cheap it is to design and build your own ergonomic keyboard with open hardware and software.
Practice 2017-03-31 02:34:15 +0000
Micah Elliott

* Nothing is better than the Optional type

Optional should be prohibited: it is an overreaction to a problem that already has an elegant solution.
Practice 2017-04-01 05:10:32 +0000
Michael Ernst

* Onboarding is Unboxing

A great product has a built-in “unboxing” planned from the start. It never leaves customers thinking about how to do something or figure it out. The funny thing about the companies that make those product experiences is that they usually don't give the same treatment to their employees. Let's start thinking of onboarding as unboxing - and start thinking of our team members as humans!
Culture 2017-03-31 02:11:27 +0000
Kristen Gallagher

* Open Source Security for Activists: Changing the world and staying safe

Staying safe in dangerous times is no easy task, especially when you're speaking the truth to power. Despite giving a voice to millions, the internet is now also a place of danger for those who try to use it to amplify those voices and make them heard. I'll be talking about by my experiences as a Nonprofit Security Advisor using Open Source tools and knowledge to help keep activists safe at the coalface.
Activism 2017-04-01 01:52:51 +0000
Chris Daley

* Out of the Game: How Apps Fail Oppressed Users (and what you can do to help)

Apps and websites routinely expose user information in service of social and interactive goals. But what happens when your user has a stalker? Many of these services will compromise the safety of users who are already at risk. Making things worse, some developers resist making changes, with justifications such as "If someone's in that much danger, they shouldn't be doing anything online," and "It's basically impossible to defend against a state actor." This overview will help developers take the risk factors into account, and make development decisions that puts control back into the hands of the users. There's no way to perfectly remove the risk of going online if you're in danger, but people will go online anyway. Many more users at risk are facing technically naive attackers than are facing highly skilled attackers such as state actors.
Activism 2017-03-31 05:29:30 +0000
Azure Jane Lunatic, Alex Byrne

* Quick and Dirty WordPress Sites That Don't Suck

If you're on a budget but you need a website that doesn't suck and actually helps your business / organization / cause, I'll show you how to create one for under $1000 / year and a lot of sweat equity.
Hacks 2017-04-07 16:35:27 +0000
Kronda Adair

* Rack 'em, Stack 'em Web Apps

While Rails is the undisputed king of Ruby web frameworks, it’s not the only option. Rack is a simple, elegant HTTP library for small Ruby web applications. This makes it ideal for microservices and applications where performance is a must.
Theory 2017-03-31 17:27:10 +0000
Jason Clark

* Reproducible Builds: Trust Building through Best Practices

Reproducible builds introduces best practices enabling bit-by-bit identical software builds. With identical builds, independent verification becomes achievable by individual developers, who are then able to publicly share those verifications to the community at large.
Practice 2017-03-31 23:02:41 +0000
Vagrant Cascadian

* Running a Leaderless Community

PHPSP is a 8 year old community based on Sao Paulo, Brazil. Who leads this Community? Itself! How? Being a Community!
Activism 2017-04-10 03:00:55 +0000
Anderson Casimiro

* self.care(): Optimizing Happiness for People In Tech

People in tech are prone to working too much and all the time, for their day jobs and volunteer projects. We work nights, weekends. We neglect family, friends and hobbies. If you want to learn about SELF care and how to practice it continuously, this talk is for you!
Practice 2017-03-22 11:19:06 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Starting Backwards

"topics include research, not losing your way, and not losing your mind."
Hacks 2017-03-30 22:57:54 +0000
Caito Scherr

* Teaching Undergraduates how to contribute to Open Source

Surprisingly, most college students, even those enrolled in a CS program, don't really know what Open Source means. What does Open Source mean? What is the difference between each of the most popular Open Source licenses? What development tools and processes do you need to be familiar with to begin to contribute to an Open Source project? How do you evaluate an Open Source project to determine if it is the right one for you? How do you gain enough confidence to submit your first pull request to a live open source project?
Culture 2017-03-31 20:38:22 +0000
Chadd Williams

* The Business of Open Source (or, how we think about it at CoreOS)

Peter Levine, a partner at Andreessen-Horowitz, famously said Red Hat would be the last successful OSS business. A dire forecast for the multitudes building their business atop of open source today. This talk is will dive into basic economic theory, how we’ve applied it at CoreOS, and ultimately describe what the current and next generation of open source business looks like.
Culture 2017-03-29 03:50:11 +0000
Elsie Phillips, Paul Burt

* The Death of Data: Retention, Rot, and Risk

I want to problematize keeping deprecated codebases around, and emphasize that mindless retention of data and code just increases our threat surfaces for attack and data corruption. Attackers in the future may be motivated by both ideology and money, and we are responsible for that.
Activism 2017-04-01 01:53:25 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* The Existential Tester: How to Assess Risk and Prioritize Tests

To test, or not to test? That is the question. With limited time and resources there are only so many tests we can write and run. How do you determine what features of a new project to test? How do you know when a test is obsolete, or needs to be updated? What gets run per-commit, nightly, or weekly? What should you test manually? This talk will give you a framework for thinking about how to assess risk on a project and prioritize your
Theory 2017-03-07 17:45:24 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* The Future of the Web is Low-Tech

Learn about the unexpected use cases of your online content and the technologies available to help expand the breadth of its distribution.
Practice 2017-03-31 16:51:36 +0000
Eric Mann

* The Kids Are Going to be 200 OK

Infosec is like sex ed. If you wait until kids need it, you have waited too long. Schools don't, peers can't, we have to.
Culture 2017-04-01 02:03:24 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* The Monster on the Project

Abusive behaviour can have profound effects on personal relationships but it can also make open source contributing and office life miserable. For those stuck in a team with co workers who exhibit toxic behavior, going to work every day can feel like going to a battlefield. Knowing how to identify and how to respond to unreasonable behavior is vital. In this talk we will look at the ways we can improve our office and FOSS communities by recognizing, managing and gracefully removing this toxic behavior.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:13:33 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* The Path of Developer

Let's know the journey of a curious girl since her very first code then school, work, community... good deploys, failures... learning... contributing... leading...
Culture 2017-04-10 02:29:03 +0000
Anderson Casimiro

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture 2017-03-01 05:34:52 +0000
Carol Smith

* The Space Between Teams

It starts small--a manageable codebase, a tight-knit team, everyone headed the same direction. But with success comes growth, and soon it’s hard to keep track of all those teams. Problems emerge in the gaps between what one team provides and another expects. Let’s look at how New Relic has faced these growing pains.
Practice 2017-03-31 17:28:37 +0000
Jason Clark

* Theory behind Image Compression and Semantic Search.

This talk will focus on describing a matrix decomposition technique called Singular Value Decomposition that conveys important geometrical and theoretical insights about linear transformations. This technique is not as famous as it should be given the range of applications from science and engineering.
Theory 2017-04-09 19:48:45 +0000
Santi Adavani

* Threading Yarn, Writing Code: What Traditional Arts and Crafts Can Teach Us About Programming

You’ve probably heard people say that programming is an art and a craft. Does it have anything to do with the traditional arts and crafts like cross stitching, knitting, or sewing? In this talk we’ll explore the intersection of traditional and modern crafts and what they can learn from each other.
Theory 2017-03-22 11:13:56 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* TIL There's a Microtonal Synth in My Browser!

Did you know there's a digital sound synthesizer in your browser? There is! It's called the Web Audio API and it's accessible from any JavaScript library or framework. I'll show you how I hacked Web Audio to make microtonal music in the browser.
Hacks 2017-03-29 20:27:46 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* Translating Ancient Texts: The Nginx Parser

Find out what it took to get Certbot's Nginx parser working, which is an... exciting... tale at the intersection of programming language theory, regular expressions, formal grammars, and the utter lack of these in a fine, aged codebase.
Practice 2017-04-01 01:43:14 +0000
Erica Portnoy

* Trolling for Change

Don't wait for companies to change their unethical policies -- go ahead and change their policies for them. This talk will dive into the tech stack of the Yes Men, a culture jamming collective that has spent the past two decades putting words in the mouths of multinational corporations.
Activism 2017-04-10 06:20:49 +0000
Chris Contolini

* Understanding Your Organization With Code Archaeology

Come on an expedition into the dark corners of your project's code basement, deep in that directory everyone avoids because it's filled with spiders and booby traps and two mysterious old versions of JQuery from 2012 that no one even remembers using. Instead of getting exasperated by variables called data and poor command-query separation, learn to use code archaeology as a way to understand your organization better.
Practice 2017-04-10 06:05:33 +0000
Liss McCabe

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture 2017-03-07 20:49:59 +0000
Sam Scott

* Want to own Twitter? The burgeoning Platform Cooperativism movement and what it means for you.

They have started up democratic copies of major platforms. They are building ways to better collaborate using the internet. They’re even talking about citizens buying out and protecting important internet communities like Twitter. Who are these people? They are Platform Cooperativists.
Activism 2017-04-01 06:18:47 +0000
Taylor McLeod

* We are the first line of defense

We, as developers, are the first line of defense for our friends, neighbors, and customers. Let’s own this responsibility and support one another in achieving a safer, more secure tech community.
Activism 2017-03-31 17:09:30 +0000
Eric Mann

* What I Learned from My Own Just In Time Compiler

We all know the V8 javascript engine, and modern JVMs, are very fast. But why? Sometimes, its easier to find out by reinventing the wheel than from reading monolithic codebases.
Theory 2017-03-29 17:08:53 +0000
Michael R Fairhurst

* What is a Bug?: Imagination and Failure in Complex Systems

When working in complex systems, bugs become more than just one-line errors: they become stories and histories, manifestations of time and space. How do you deal with failure - not as an unanticipated event - but as a natural and expected outcome?
Practice 2017-03-26 02:46:10 +0000
Bonnie Eisenman

* Where Am I? Build Your Own Open-Source Geocoder!

At Hack Oregon, we often need to geocode or reverse-geocode - translate an address to latitude and longitude or vice versa. There are public APIs for this, but most of them have rate limits or intellectual property constraints that impact their usefulness. So we built our own, using the Census Bureau TIGER/Line® shapefiles, PostGIS Tiger geocoder, and Docker. I'll go through the process, from downloading the data and filtering to deploying the final image.
Practice 2017-04-01 00:18:41 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* Why the Internet Loves Cats

When you love your work, when you are passionate, it is easy to push yourself too hard and burn out. Burnout is a real problem in the tech industry. We hear a lot about self care, but what is it? How do you do it? And what does it have to do with cats on the internet? In this interactive session, we will explore the subject together to find an answer to these burning questions.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:28:03 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Why you should try volunteer teaching

A talk about my experience teaching classes as a volunteer and how it's an important, rewarding way to help your community
Activism 2017-03-31 18:34:42 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Writing Inclusively about Technology Topics

Based on The Responsible Communication Style Guide, this workshop is an introduction to the concepts in the style guide. It also covers how a style guide can be an effective part of the workflow when creating and promoting technology projects (including open source).
Culture 2017-04-04 20:57:11 +0000
Thursday Bram

* You Suck at Remote Working

Everyone is a remote worker unless you speak to nobody outside your own 4 walls.
Practice 2017-04-05 17:36:31 +0000
Jeff Holt

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* Real World Docker

Let’s deep dive into how New Relic transformed itself to run on Docker.
Practice
Jason Clark

* An Introduction to ClojureScript

ClojureScript is a fun, productive language that compiles to JavaScript. Though its syntax is a different its functional immutable nature lets you be productive when developing complex web applications.
Theory
Julio Barros

* Behind Closed Doors: Managing Passwords in a Dangerous World

A modern application has a lot of passwords and keys floating around. Encryption keys, database passwords, and API credentials; often typed in to text files and forgotten. Fortunately a new wave of tools are emerging to help manage, update, and audit these secrets. Come learn how to avoid being the next TechCrunch headline.
Practice
Noah Kantrowitz

* Bringing OOP Best Practices to the World of Functional Programming

I transitioned from writing software in imperative, object-oriented (OO) programming languages to doing functional programming (FP) full-time, and you can do it, too! In this talk, I'll make a case for FP in the corporate development environment, cover some cases where common FP language features substitute for design patterns and OOP structure, and provide some examples of translating traditional OO design patterns into functional code.
Practice
Elana Hashman

* Creating a Third Wave of Free/Open Source Software

The free/open source software movement is over thirty years old, and has gone through a number of changes in that time, spawning projects large and small (including OpenConferenceWare, which runs this site!). If Free Software is the first generation, and Open Source is the second, current efforts toward creating an inclusive and sustainable world make up a third generation that we can start to form into a broader plan.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Documentaries, Accessibility, and Open Culture

I've been making a documentary film about accessibility for almost a year now. What I've realized is that film is fundamentally hard to access. Let's talk about what that means for culture, creators, and consumers.
Culture
Chris Higgins

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Besides, great mentors are critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Great Asana!

Bring your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips, aching back, and busy mind and explore how Yoga can help bring you relief, rest, and focus. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind. This class is accessible to all levels of ability.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Hardware Hula Hoops and Flow

In psychology flow is the honed in energized focus you get when performing tasks that are challenging that can be experienced in hula hooping and programming.
Hacks
Lindsey Bieda

* Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss

Like many young Muggles of the early 00's, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it's clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers -- I mean, wizards -- we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you'll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.
Culture
Lacey Williams Henschel

* Inside Websockets

Protocol design is about tradeoffs, and if you pick the wrong tradeoff, you may regret it for a very long time. Any time you have one part of a program talk to another part of a program, you have a protocol. In this talk, we'll dig into the details of how WebSockets work and what decisions the designers made.
Theory
Leah Hanson

* Less Painful Legacy Code Replacement

Replacing legacy code is a challenge on every front, from managing stakeholder expectations to tackling the technical work. Thoughtful preparation and a pocket full of tools can make the experience a little less painful.
Practice
Jennifer Tu

* Little Leaks Sink Your Tests

"The tests pass on my machine." "Wait, it was working a minute ago." "Oh, that test is flaky sometimes." Unpredictable tests are toxic for our productivity. They undermine confidence in our code. They encourage us to wallpaper over the immediate problem, rather than fixing the underlying cause. In this presentation, we'll talk about a chief cause of flaky tests: leaky global state.
Practice
Ian Dees

* Micro-services provide some benefits, but at what cost?

Several years ago, there was an architectural paradigm shift toward "micro-services" and away from the "monolithic" application stack. A micro-service architecture comes with scalability and replaceability, among others, but is it worth the time and effort to build it? Is it worth debugging API calls gone wrong? If you're thinking about making this move, have already started, or have already deployed to production, this is an ideal venue to see what others are doing with micro-services.
Theory
Serge Domkowski

* Monitoring Asynchronous Applications

The lure of asynchronous programming is that it will make your application run faster and your code simpler to reason about. So we have our wonderfully efficient non-blocking app; how do we check that it's delivering the goods performance wise?
Practice
Amy Boyle

* Monoids, and Sketches, and CRDTs, oh my!

A (hopefully) accessible introduction to some of the key mathematical concepts that make distributed and streaming computation possible.
Theory
Kevin Scaldeferri

* Sustainable Career Development: Advancing While Still Having Free Time

In this talk, we'll examine the pressure in the tech industry to participate in work-related extracurriculars like side projects and meetups. We'll analyze where these expectations come from, what they're actually getting at, and talk about ideas for progressing in our careers without losing sight of the things in life that make us happy outside of work.
Culture
Noelle Daley

* The Key Of Chaos

We built an open-hardware random number generator. We'll tell you all about it.
Theory
Bart Massey

* Type Theory 101

Have you heard about type theory and always wanted to understand the principles behind it, but always thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of Lambda Calculus and algebras? This talk will approach these concepts in a friendly way.
Theory
Hanneli Tavante

* Unikernels and Containers: How to Even

Let's talk about what containers and unikernels -- two oft-compared technologies -- even are, how they work, and what problems they solve.
Practice
Mindy Preston

* Unraveling the Masculinization of Technology

Have you ever wondered where the perception that technology is a masculine pursuit comes from? Or why we have to explain that, "no really, women are interested in computers too"?
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* What Hath Von Neumann Wrought? Programming before programming languages

We program today in a rich environment, but that wasn't always the case. We celebrate the pioneers of programming languages: Grace Hopper (COBOL), John Backus (FORTRAN), John McCarthy (LISP), Kenneth Iverson (APL) and Peter Naur (ALGOL). But there was a time before programming languages. How did people program back then? I'll show you!
Theory
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

Favorite proposals for this user

* Building Your World in WebVR

We will explore how we can utilize webvr to build amazing VR experience right into everyone's pocket, using their mobile phones they use right now. No need for expensive or closed source tools or solutions. Utilize the mobile phone with cardboard and uisng just javascript and html to build VR world. How using api's of webvr and Aframe we game developers and UI builders can build awesome experience.
Theory 2016-04-10 00:12:11 +0000
Rabimba Karanjai

* Can Online Interaction Match some of the Magic of Face-to-Face Collaboration?

Join this interactive session connecting what we know about face-to-face collaboration and how and why it works with what online dialog, games, berry-picking, wayfinding and other large scale activities can accomplish.
Theory 2016-04-17 17:20:06 +0000
Carie Fox

* Designing and Writing Secure Software

Attackers only need to be right once, but developers have to be right all the time. Secure software development practices are essential.
Practice 2016-04-13 23:34:56 +0000
Aaron Jensen

* Domain-Driven Data

There are many types of open source databases and data analysis tools from which to choose today. Should you use a relational database? How about a key-value store? Maybe a document database? Or is a graph database the right fit for your project? What about polyglot persistence? Help!
Practice 2016-04-13 22:03:19 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Exploring Functional Programming Through Games

How do you decide whether a new programming paradigm is worth learning or not? I ask myself a simple question: can I use it to make games in a simple way? Learning by playing is super fun. Allow me to take you on a thrilling journey to explore functional programming through JavaScript games. Let us dive deep into functional features that will help us approach complex problems from new directions and write bulletproof code.
Practice 2016-04-09 00:04:06 +0000
Khalid A

* From Mobile First to Offline First

It's all too easy assume that your web or mobile app will run on a fast and reliable network with great coverage. The reality for your app's users, though, is often a slow and unreliable network with spotty coverage. What happens when the network doesn't work, or when the device is in airplane mode? You get unhappy, frustrated users. Building on the principles of mobile first, offline first is an approach to application design in which a web, mobile, desktop, or Internet of Things (IoT) application is built for offline usage first and is then progressively enhanced to take advantage of network connectivity when available.
Practice 2016-04-14 19:20:48 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Hackers & Hearthstone & Humanity

Sometimes the tech community can feel like it is without soul so Hackers & Hearthstone was created to focus on the cool things people are doing within the technology world.
Culture 2016-03-30 15:24:46 +0000
Lindsey Bieda

* Lossless Emoji - Doing Emoji Right

Learn how difficult it can be to do emoji right and what you can do to preserve the message and emotions of your users. If you take user input, you owe it to the internet to attend this talk.
Practice 2016-04-13 07:21:09 +0000
Ryan Kennedy

* Made in the Machine: New Cultural Practices, Critical Analyses, and Techniques in Digital Fabrication, Making, and Manufacturing

I first knowingly witnessed the "Maker Movement" in 2010, heeded its siren call by joining the MIT Media Lab in 2011, and became disillusioned later that year. But I've been stubbornly making--and critiquing the notions of Making--ever since.
Culture 2016-04-11 00:20:51 +0000
Arlene Ducao

* Open Source Fan Service

What can you do when someone submits a bad patch to your project? To begin, we have to understand why people hunger to contribute code: they're fans. You hurt fans' feelings when you reject their patches, but you hurt your project if you accept them. You can get out of this bind! Give your fans other ways to be recognized. Showcase their plugins in your project’s wiki, or rewrite their patches while giving them credit, or feature their related projects on your site.
Culture 2016-03-26 21:59:46 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Open Source Your Ideas: Why You Should Keep A Blog

Blogging is a great way for developers to share with the community the kind of things they've been learning and working on. By keeping a regularly updated blog, we force ourselves to continually evaluate the things we're learning, while sharing these ideas with the community at large.
Culture 2016-03-27 23:52:56 +0000
Andrew Pierce

* Our daily graphs with Neo4j

Have you ever noticed that many situations could it be expressed with a graph? Graphs are not only a boring subject into College, they can be really useful in many situations. This talk will show you some graph modelling with a nice graph database written mostly in Java: Neo4j. Through examples, we will see a little bit about graph theory, a quick introduction to Neo4j architecture, a handful tool called Cypher, non-trivial modelling and use cases.
Practice 2016-04-16 17:23:33 +0000
Hanneli Tavante

* Peeking into Ruby: Tracing Running Code

Your Ruby app is in production, but something isn’t quite right. It worked locally, it passed CI… why’s the running app acting weird?
Practice 2016-04-07 16:46:30 +0000
Jason Clark

* Technical writing as public service: working on open source in government

What if U.S. federal agencies decided to reuse and contribute to open source software projects built by other agencies, since agencies often have similar technology problems to solve? And what if they hired technical writers with open source community experience to write documentation for these projects? That would be pretty cool. Also, that’s my work. I'm part of 18F, a digital services consulting team within and for the federal government, and all of our work is open source.
Practice 2016-04-06 00:21:15 +0000
Britta Gustafson

* The JSON-Driven Schema

Learn how to use Postgres to explore a JSON data set.
Practice 2016-04-12 16:58:07 +0000
Jason Owen

* What Shipping Containers Can Teach Us About Digital Content Standards

Global trade wouldn’t be as efficient without the invention - and standardization - of shipping containers. Standardized containers have globalized our economy across the shipping industry in a way that wouldn’t have been possible otherwise. What can this earlier standardization effort teach us about the tools and systems we’re building today? What are the struggles of our digital age? How are the struggles of shipping goods in 1950s similar to our content struggles now - and how can we move forward?
Theory 2016-04-11 18:07:00 +0000
Kendra Skeene, Nikhil Deshpande

* When Harry Met Iannis 2016

Iannis Xenakis passed away on February 4, 2001. When he arrived in Heaven, he sought out his mentor, Olivier Messiaen. Messiaen said, “Iannis, there’s someone here I want you to meet.” The two walked over to a small sidewalk cafe, and there sat Harry Partch. And so from this fanciful meeting in Heaven, “When Harry Met Iannis” was born. Now I'm not a carpenter like Partch was, and I don't have access to conductors or orchestras like Xenakis did, so I'll have to synthesize instruments and performers. The software that makes this possible is an open-source language called ChucK. I'll talk a bit about the Partch music theory, Xenakis' use of game theory and the ChucK language. But mostly, this talk is about the music and not the tools that made it. And you'll be the first to hear "When Harry Met Iannis 2016" in its entirety.
Practice 2016-03-15 03:35:20 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* "R" You Ready for Some Football? Hacking Fantasy Sports with Open Source Software

You've probably heard about "robot jounalism" - computers writing finance and sports stories. Well, there's just one teensy little problem with robots writing finance and sports stories: investors and fantasy sports gamers don't want the data turned into text! They want their data raw, right and fast. They need clean, timely data to make objective decisions using tried-and-true statistical methodologies. So I'm not going to talk about robot journalism - I'm going to talk about fantasy sports: getting the data, analyzing it and using statistical decision-making tools to enhance the probability of winning.
Hacks
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* A Profile of Performance Profiling With pprof

When our code is slow, performance gains can often difficult to obtain. Our ideas of where to focus our attention are often wrong. pprof has become my go to tool, and it's easy to see why. Together we'll learn how to understand pprof's output to help us zero in on the parts of our code that need the most love.
Cooking
Lauren Voswinkel

* Cat-herd's Crook: Enforcing Standards in 10 Programming Languages

At MongoDB we write open source database drivers in ten programming languages. Ideally, all behave the same. We also help developers in the MongoDB community replicate our libraries’ behavior in even more (and more exotic) languages. How can we herd these cats along the same track? For years we failed, but we’ve recently gained momentum on standardizing our libraries. Testable, machine-readable specs prove which code conforms and which does not.
Cooking
Samantha Ritter, A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Dog Food is for Dogs: Escape the Crate of Your Perspective with User Research

Dogfooding—using your own products—is nice, but is it sufficient to produce good design for people who aren’t you? Our familiarity with our projects and their quirks makes us poor substitutes for users in the wild. So just who are these users, and how do you incorporate them into design and development? In this workshop, we'll explore user experience design and research strategies that will help you design for people who aren’t you.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan, amelia abreu

* Email as Distributed Protocol Transport: How Meeting Invites Work and Ideas for the Future

Learn how meeting invites work and some crazy other ideas for distributed protocols built on email.
Chemistry
Christine Spang

* Fear Driven Development

Have you ever not made a much-needed change because you were afraid of breaking something? Caution is wise, but too much fear can leave even the most agile of software organizations with a crippling aversion to change. This talk will discuss what makes us scared, why it hurts us, and my experiences helping a team I managed get rid of some of our fears.
Culture
Ryan Kennedy

* Hacking Minecraft!

Minecraft is an incredibly popular game with developers. I'll give a brief tour of opportunities to practice your craft in the Minecraft world and walkthrough some tutorials using popular open source projects.
Chemistry
Jonan Scheffler

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Business
Ed Finkler

* How to Teach Git

Version control is a necessary piece of the open source community and git has an unfortunately steep learning curve. Here is what I have learned from teaching git to beginners, so you don’t have to make the same mistakes.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh

* How you tell the story matters: telling better stories and making better technologies

What happens when we tell stories? How do we tell stories about the technology we build, why do some stories get told over others? How do we talk about our successes, and how do we not talk about our failures? Whose stories get heard: how do women, people of color, disabled people, and “non-technical” workers get left out of the stories we hear? In this talk, I'll explore the role of storytelling in technology, and share what I've found about telling better stories.
Business
amelia abreu

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Making the web fun again

When Geocities shut down, it did much more than delete a bunch of obnoxious dancing baby GIFs and Limp Bizkit MIDI files. It deleted the ability for people to easily create web sites, and learn how to be in complete control of the content and presentation they provide to their audience. To the economically and socially disenfranchised, it was a disaster that prevented countless people from learning programming. So we brought it back, and open sourced the entire thing (including our financial data). Leave your nostalgia at the door - let us show you our efforts to pave a better future for tech startups, the tech community, and the future of the web itself.
Culture
Kyle Drake, Victoria Wang

* Monads Made Semi-Understandable

The word monad is all around us. I've heard long explanations of it that seem to over complicate it or make it intimidating. At Hacker School one of my goals was to learn some category theory, and understand the beast. I finally got it, and it wasn't so bad. I wanted to explain monads in a way that would not intimidate people and that would so some solid examples so if they felt like i had before, I might be able to help.
Hacks
libby kent

* Probably

If you want to understand probability better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Project Fear

Project fear, not dissimilar to imposter syndrome, tends to affect all project leaders at some point (or many points) in their career. This session will tackle project fear by fully defining it, investigating its roots, noting its symptoms, and ultimately discussing a number of successful coping mechanisms.
Business
Adam Edgerton

* Reinventing black boxes

Open source has a long history of reimplementing, and reverse engineering proprietary tools. This talk will integrate the tools needed to reverse engineer into stories of how it has been done before.
Hacks
Daniel Johnson

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Testing the Multiverse

It’s a basic principle of testing that minimizing dependencies will make you happier, faster, and more productive. But what happens when you can’t?
Cooking
Jason Clark

* The Open Source Writing Stack

Open source makes writing and publishing much easier both online and in print — provided you know what tools to use. This talk covers those tools (from LaTeX to WordPress) and how to choose between them.
Hacks
Thursday Bram

* Tricking Out the Terminal: An Introduction

A beginner-focused overview of the particulars and pitfalls of the command line and several common shells, with a focus on improving developer workflows, exposing common default tools, implementing useful open-source tools, and inserting emoji into prompts (pretty much the best part of customizing the terminal).
Chemistry
Lydia Katsamberis

* What's in a name? Phonetic Algorithms for Search and Similarity

Search can be as simple as returning a word or part of word based on character similarity. LIKE and wildcard matches can be sufficient, but can only account for character or string matching, and fail on misspelled words or names. Phonetic algorithms can help us find matches for misspellings and typo'd user data.
Chemistry
Mercedes Coyle

* When Your Codebase Is Nearly Old Enough To Vote

What do you do when your project is so old that technology has changed around you? (Or, how do you future-proof a project that you've just started so that when it gets that old, you'll be ready?) Come hear a case study of Dreamwidth Studios, a fifteen-year-old web app with a codebase consisting of a quarter million lines of legacy Perl and a mission to modernize ... if it doesn't break everything.
Chemistry
Denise Paolucci

* You Got Your Idris in My C++! A First Look at Denotational Design

Programmers gripe that we have two kinds of programming languages: the ones we write in for fun, and the ones we write in because we have to. We may enjoy coding that weekend project in Agda, but we have to leave that smile behind on Monday morning when we go back to Java or C++. But is that really the case? Or can we find a way of bringing the expressiveness, the rigor, or the fun of our favorite languages into our day jobs?
Chemistry
Ian Dees