Ian Dees

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Ian Dees

New Relic

Biography

Ian Dees was first bitten by the programming bug in 1986 on a Timex Sinclair 1000, and has been having a blast in his software apprenticeship ever since. By day, Ian slings code, tests, and puns at New Relic. By night, he dons a cape and keeps watch over the city as Sidekick Man. In his (heh) “spare time,” he converts espresso into programming books, including the team effort Seven More Languages in Seven Weeks.

Open Source Bridge 2017

Proposals for this user

* Here's Your Computer, Good Luck, Bye! Lessons Learned in Onboarding

Have you ever joined a team where they just turned you loose on day one and expected you to come up to speed on your own? How did that feel? In this presentation, we're going to look at onboarding from the perspective of a new hire. We'll go over what's worked and what hasn't worked for the teams I've been on. The specifics will be different for your teams, of course, but we'll discover some general principles together. By the end of the talk, you'll be coming up with your own ideas you can apply to your team's onboarding process. By making a few simple changes, you can improve morale, boost productivity, and keep your fellow engineers around longer.
Culture 2017-04-10 01:00:09 +0000
Ian Dees

* Running Just the Test Cases You Need

When you're writing software, fast feedback is key. The less you have to wait for your tests to run, the sooner you'll know whether or not your code is correct. Ruby's two main test frameworks (minitest and RSpec) support several different techniques for testing only what you need for what you're currently working on, and nothing more. In this talk, we'll go through several of these practices for both frameworks, each more automated and awesome than the last.
Practice 2017-04-10 01:14:36 +0000
Ian Dees

Open Source Bridge 2016

Sessions for this user

* Little Leaks Sink Your Tests

"The tests pass on my machine." "Wait, it was working a minute ago." "Oh, that test is flaky sometimes." Unpredictable tests are toxic for our productivity. They undermine confidence in our code. They encourage us to wallpaper over the immediate problem, rather than fixing the underlying cause. In this presentation, we'll talk about a chief cause of flaky tests: leaky global state.
Practice
Ian Dees

Open Source Bridge 2015

Sessions for this user

* You Got Your Idris in My C++! A First Look at Denotational Design

Programmers gripe that we have two kinds of programming languages: the ones we write in for fun, and the ones we write in because we have to. We may enjoy coding that weekend project in Agda, but we have to leave that smile behind on Monday morning when we go back to Java or C++. But is that really the case? Or can we find a way of bringing the expressiveness, the rigor, or the fun of our favorite languages into our day jobs?
Chemistry
Ian Dees

Open Source Bridge 2014

Proposals for this user

* C++11 From the Trenches

"I'm from the C++ standards committee, and I'm here to help." Are they really? The 2011 revision of the language contains a ton of changes that are supposed to help us solve problems. But which problems, and why? In this presentation, we're going cut through the bullet lists and get right to the parts of C++11 that can actually make life easier for programmers.
Cooking 2014-04-11 18:33:53 +0000
Ian Dees