Rhys Fureigh's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Developer's-Eye View of API Client Libraries

A developer's experience of an API and its client libraries can make the difference between them building on a project and giving up in frustration. If you develop an API client library, you'll learn what you can do to get it out of the way so developers can spend mental energy on putting together exciting projects, not fighting with tools. If you work with web APIs, you'll learn about factors to consider when you're choosing a framework to use. Either way, you'll learn about best practices--code-related and not--that make the difference between fun and easy development and a frustrating slog.
Cooking
Frances Hocutt

* A Pair Programming Workshop

Pair programming is a great way to collaborate on code and to share new ideas and techniques, but the social dynamics can be challenging. In this session, we'll talk about what works and what doesn't, and practice some techniques for better pairing!
Culture
Moss Collum, Laura Dean

* A Profile of Performance Profiling With pprof

When our code is slow, performance gains can often difficult to obtain. Our ideas of where to focus our attention are often wrong. pprof has become my go to tool, and it's easy to see why. Together we'll learn how to understand pprof's output to help us zero in on the parts of our code that need the most love.
Cooking
Lauren Voswinkel

* Bridging the Digital Divide with SMS Bots

We all know about Twitter and IRC bots, but with about 4/5 of people worldwide without smartphones SMS has the potential to reach those left behind the digital divide. We will discuss the various methods for developing an SMS bot, the legal and ethical implications of doing so, and we will build an SMS bot live.
Cooking
Briar Schreiber

* Bringing non-technical people to the Free/Libre/Open world and why it matters

Software freedom advocates sometimes believe a myth of "trickle-down technology" — that open collaboration and freedom for programmers will somehow lead to more free and open technology for the rest of society. To build technology that truly empowers most people, we need more non-programmers actively involved in development. I'll share my story of how I started as a music teacher and became the co-founder of an ambitious Free/Libre/Open project. We'll discus lessons about outreach to others like me.
Culture
Aaron Wolf

* Bringing Security to Your Open Source Project

With high profile breaches in open source projects, the issue of security has become one of great import to many people. But many projects, especially smaller ones, are intimidated by the idea of a security audit. This talk will discuss ways for smaller projects to experiment, learn, and even have fun improving their security. No PhDs in security required!
Culture
Terri Oda

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Building mentoring into an open source community that welcomes and values new contributors

This session will talk about how to integrate mentoring into all the different layers of an open source project. This involves a change in the whole community which treats new contributors with respect, knowing they have something valuable to contribute to the project.
Culture
Cathy Theys

* Cassandra at the Keyboard: Whistleblowing at all scales

What do you do if you see something that needs change in your organization. How do you "say something" for your "see something"? What are the benefits and drawbacks of even minor whistleblowing?
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* Cat-herd's Crook: Enforcing Standards in 10 Programming Languages

At MongoDB we write open source database drivers in ten programming languages. Ideally, all behave the same. We also help developers in the MongoDB community replicate our libraries’ behavior in even more (and more exotic) languages. How can we herd these cats along the same track? For years we failed, but we’ve recently gained momentum on standardizing our libraries. Testable, machine-readable specs prove which code conforms and which does not.
Cooking
Samantha Ritter, A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Desigining for Renaming

Renaming yourself is never easy. In Santa Clara County in the State of California, to file a petition to change one's name costs over $400, and may take six months or more. Then one must change one's name (and possibly one's gender marker) on the dozens of sites and services one uses. On many sites, that's easy, I go to preferences and edit my name. But then the site addresses me as "Mr. Emma Humphries," oh really? Other systems will correctly greet me as "Emma" when I log in. But still call me by $DEAD_NAME when they send an email. This brings us to the first best practice: When I change my name in one place, change it in all the places.
Culture
Emma Humphries

* Developer and the DOM - A history of manipulation and abstraction

As web developers we see a variety of tools evolve every year that all claim to be the future of web development, but few people are as excited to explore the past. In this talk we’ll trace the lineage of the contemporary web landscape back to the advent of the DOM and the first browser javascript API. In doing so we hope to illuminate an often overlooked historical perspective on web development and explain why frameworks like React and Angular came into existence and why today is an exciting time to be working with the browser.
Chemistry
Zachary Michael, Gregory Noack

* Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Pelican: A Comparison of Static Site Generators

Want to make a static site or blog, but not sure where to start? Tired of using Wordpress and looking for something better? This talk will get into the nitty-gritty details of how Jekyll and Pelican -- two popular static site generators -- work, and explain how to choose which is best for your project. Using examples you can clone from github, we'll cover the pros and cons of both SSGs, discuss things that neither does well, and give you a better idea of how to get your site up and running (with an open source tool!).
Chemistry
Lucy Wyman

* Economics of Volunteer Labor: Three stories from Debian

What circumstances allow volunteer projects to flourish? This talk covers three examples in Debian, diving deep into the questions like whose permission is required, what technical background is needed, and more, to highlight lessons of that can help any open source community organize its activities to empower volunteers.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* For Love and For Money

Let’s talk about the work we want to do, the work we have to do, and how we might create systems that don’t continue to force bad choices between building community, technical work, and diversity activism.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Free Your Money: Open Source Crowdfunding Tips & Tools

Crowdfunding has become big business for companies like Kickstarter and Patreon. This 'corporate crowdfunding tax' can sometimes burden small projects. Is it time to kick commercial crowdfunding to the curb? Let's share new strategies for DIY marketing and funding project online with Open Source tools
Business
Skyler Corbett

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* From the Unicorn’s Mouth: Stories of Managing Multiple Diverse Identities in Tech

We each have many critical facets to our identity-- race, gender, sexuality, class, health, and family background are just a handful of examples-- and the interaction between them can shape our lives more than any one factor alone. In this panel discussion, learn about intersectionality, and what the experiences of those living at the crossroads of different minority identities can teach us about what it takes to create a truly inclusive open source community.
Culture
Megan Baker, Thalida Noel, Nichole Burton, Lisa Sy

* Good Enough Voter Verification & Other Identity Architecture Schemes for Online Communities

This talk is a deep dive into considerations for Identity Architecture for online communities. It's most specifically applications for political action, civic engagement, or virtual nations. I'll talk about pragmatic solutions for voter verification using the state voter registration database, schemes for peer to peer authentication, offline/online identification, Impartial Identity Architecture to control conflict, and more. The discussion is high level and appropriate for beginners, but there will be links to code and big ideas.
Culture
Ele Mooney

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal and social identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* How to Read a Stack Trace

When you're trying to make sense of an surprising software crash or an unexpected test failure, knowing your way around a stack trace can make the difference between bewildered frustration and finding a root cause.
Cooking
Moss Collum

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Internet of Things Militia: Paramilitary Training for your IoT devices

Security folk generally talk about how the Internet of Things is bad for security, but it also brings new sensors and connected devices that could co-operate in new and interesting ways. Could we use internet things to enhance security?
Hacks
Terri Oda

* kenny_g.rb: Making Ruby Write Smooth Jazz

For too long, computers have been shut out of the red-hot music-to-listen-to-while-relaxing-in-the-bathtub genre. Today, that all changes. Our smooth-jazz-as-a-service startup is primed to disrupt this stale industry. All we need is a little Ruby and we'll make automated musical magic.
Hacks
Tim Krajcar

* Male/Female/Othered: Implementing Gender-Inclusiveness in User Data Collection

You want to gather information about your users that you can use to improve their experience and yours. They want their identities to be acknowledged and treated with respect. This talk is about meeting both needs: How to ask about gender in ways that welcome the diversity of reality while still being able to analyze the data you get back. We'll discuss the nature of that challenge, how some major websites address it, and example solutions for different scenarios.
Culture
Finn Ellis, Jonathan Harker

* Micropub: The Emerging API Standard for IndieWeb Apps

Micropub is an emerging open API standard that is used to create posts on your own domain using third-party apps. Web apps and mobile apps can use Micropub to post notes, photos, bookmarks and many other kinds of posts to your own website, similar to using a Twitter client to post to your Twitter account.
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Open Source Tools of the Hardware Hacking Trade

Many embedded systems contain design flaws that could lead to exploitable vulnerabilities. In order to discover such flaws, hackers and engineers use a specific set of tools. In this session, Joe will discuss his favorite open source hardware hacking and reverse engineering tools, including those that monitor/decode digital communications, extract firmware, inject/spoof data, and identify/connect to debug interfaces.
Cooking
Joe Grand

* Opening Up The Current Open Source Blueprint

Accessibility, diversity, and open source holding itself accountable to its own standards of what it means to be an open community.
Culture
Stephanie Morillo

* Probably

If you want to understand probability better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Removing Barriers: Ascend Project Post Mortem

Last year the Ascend Project was announced, then in the fall the first pilot took place in Portland. This year we'll report back on how it went, hear from participants, and break down what worked and what could be changed for future versions of this type of program. You'll definitely come away with some ideas for your next learning event, code school, or sponsored training.
Hacks
Lukas Blakk, Kronda Adair

* So how do you reach every person on the planet: Internationalization at Twitter

Twitter is the world’s most popular platform which enables users to create and share ideas and information instantly, without barriers. In order to fulfill this mission, it has to provide language support for every person seamlessly. This talk will walk through Twitter’s open source language libraries, internationalization and localization standards and technologies.
Chemistry
Alolita Sharma

* Software Archeology and The Code Of Doom

You approach the legacy codebase with trepidation. If the vine-draped entrance and collapsing roof weren't enough warning, traces of previous explorers before you lie scattered about, caught in bizarre traps and oubliettes. What next, snakes?!
Chemistry
Kerri Miller

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Teaching and managing for technologists

After 15 years or so working as a programmer I made two big changes in my job: first I became a manager, then I started working with college students to help them learn to code. This is a personal story of why that has been some of the most challenging and rewarding work I've ever done.
Culture
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Testing the Multiverse

It’s a basic principle of testing that minimizing dependencies will make you happier, faster, and more productive. But what happens when you can’t?
Cooking
Jason Clark

* The Graceful Exit: Approaches for Changing One's Role in an Open Community

Open culture communities are passionate, dedicated backed by people. What happens when those people need to change their roles within the community? I've played varied roles in open culture communities through the years. In this talk I'll go over what worked well and what I wish I had approached in a different way when my role needed to change.
Culture
Kate Chapman

* Trustworthy software in the real world

Software is made of bugs, yet software is controlling a growing part of our physical world. As bugs and security holes become potentially life-threatening, what can we do to make our software worthy of the trust we're placing in it? Take quadcopters, for example. Toy vehicles are not just in specialty hobby shops but even in supermarkets; sports stadiums and the White House are trying to find ways to keep them out; and everyone from agriculture startups to Amazon wants to use them commercially. Quadcopters are becoming safety and security critical systems, but how are we going to make them truly safe and secure? I'll present SMACCMPilot, a BSD-licensed high-assurance quadcopter autopilot, and the new tools and technologies that make it feasible to trust a large piece of software.
Hacks
Jamey Sharp

* Universal Web Design: How to create an awesome experience for *every* user

In this talk, I will describe how Universal Web Design principles can be easily applied to new or existing sites, how these principles will improve your users’ experience, and how Universal Web Design will save you time and money.
Culture
David Newton

* User Research For Non-Researchers

User research doesn't have to be time-consuming, elaborate, or performed by a UX professional. If you're willing to talk to a few strangers, you can do user research. In this presentation, I'll talk about how to do lightweight research on any product or topic, no matter what your background and training are. I'll focus on the most effective tools for quick research, and some of the common pitfalls for novice researchers.
Cooking
Jane Davis

* Using Julia & D3 to analyse web performance data

If you've always wanted to play around with D3 or Julia, or both, this talk will get you up to speed very quickly. Using web performance data as the vehicle, and an aim to extract meaningful information from it, we will explore both Julia and D3 and come up with some fun visualizations that may not be possible using only one of these tools.
Chemistry
Philip Tellis

* Venturing into the Spooky Science of Ruby

Grab a scalpel as we put Ruby on the table to look at this lovely language's internals. We'll start with class inheritance and method lookup, and then explore the mysterious eigenclass and how it fits in. We'll use our newfound knowledge to turn children into zombies, meet unexpected vampires, and make our own Ruby mutants. Okay, so maybe it won't be too spooky, but you'll come away having a better understanding of Ruby objects and their internals (and braaaains!).
Chemistry
Zoe Kay

* What stuttering taught me about marketing - not your typical soft skills talk

Your weakness just might be your greatest strength.
Culture
Sharon Steed

* What's in a name? Phonetic Algorithms for Search and Similarity

Search can be as simple as returning a word or part of word based on character similarity. LIKE and wildcard matches can be sufficient, but can only account for character or string matching, and fail on misspelled words or names. Phonetic algorithms can help us find matches for misspellings and typo'd user data.
Chemistry
Mercedes Coyle

* When Your Codebase Is Nearly Old Enough To Vote

What do you do when your project is so old that technology has changed around you? (Or, how do you future-proof a project that you've just started so that when it gets that old, you'll be ready?) Come hear a case study of Dreamwidth Studios, a fifteen-year-old web app with a codebase consisting of a quarter million lines of legacy Perl and a mission to modernize ... if it doesn't break everything.
Chemistry
Denise Paolucci

* Why Relationships Matter in Community Building: Experiences from the Philippine Cultural Heritage Mapping Project

What makes a successful project? It's not only a solid idea, firm execution and attention to the numbers. It's also successfully building working relationships between community members. This presentation will explore how one of Wikimedia Philippines' biggest projects was successful in large part to how the organization engaged its participants, and ultimately how they have come to be part of the wider Filipino Wikimedia community.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Write It Down: Process Documentation from the Ground Up

The collective knowledge base of an organization can be difficult to crack. Some things have "always been done that way" but no one knows why. This talk will help to expose those undocumented corners of your project, and give you tools for writing process documentation for new contributors using lessons from Not-For-Profit organizations.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Yoga!

Accessible yoga for people of all levels, special attention given to yoga postures and breathing that you can do at your desk.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Your Job is Political: Tech Money in Politics

As much as the personal is political, the old-fashioned political still is too, and companies and individuals made rich by the tech industry and by open source software have been making increasingly direct monetary incursions into U.S. politics. Let's take a look at what policies & politicians our bosses, investors, users and contributors are buying at the local and state levels, with a specific focus on current changes in education policy and future moves in law enforcement.
Business
Kelsey Gilmore-Innis

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* A Few Python Tips

Nothing fancy here, just several tips that help you work effectively with Python. This talk is licensed CC BY; please feel free to reuse it at your company or conference.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara

* Advanced Javascript Basics for Web Developers

Javascript is a necessity for modern web development. Whether it is to add more interactivity to your user interface, or provide a client to interact with your API, chances are, even if you're trying to avoid working in javascript, you're working in javascript. Projects like Coffeescript and Opal, while useful, still do not help understand the javascript outputted by these compile-able languages. One growing concern in this realm is that an application's javascript can sometimes be a security concern, easily exploited by a malicious user. In order to catch these concerns, you must know what your javascript does, inside and out. This talk will illustrate concepts to make sure your client code is secure, while still giving your team the flexibility it needs to keep building your stellar app!
Chemistry
Lauren Voswinkel

* Beyond Leaning In: How to Negotiate to Get What You Want

Now that you know how important it is to ask for want you want, come learn how to negotiate in a way that will get you what you need. For everyone of any gender identity who works at a company or freelances, who feels like a newb or an expert, this presentation will teach you effective, practical skills to improve your negotiations and deal confidently with conflicts.
Business
Katie Lane

* Civilizing IRC and forums: moderation strategies for mutual respect

As a project's public IRC channel or forum grows, it's hard to keep it friendly. People get frustrated with each other, people have "different" senses of humor, disagreements escalate...oh goodness, it can be a mess. This isn't great for retaining community members or welcoming new ones. I'll share my strategies for dealing with problems, learned at the scale of hundreds of forum threads, tens of thousands of forum visitors, and dozens of IRC chatters every day.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor

* Confessions of a DBA: worst and best things I've done in production

In the past 15 years, I've done some pretty horrendous things around the M in LAMP. I will balance this with good things I've done too.
Cooking
Emily Slocombe

* Data Wrangling: Getting Started Working with Data for Visualizations

Good data visualization allows us to leverage the incredible pattern-recognition abilities of the human brain to answer questions we care about. But how do you make a good visualization? Here's a crash course.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan

* Data, Privacy, & Trust in Open Source: 10 Lessons from Wikipedia

Few people today are not concerned with the way data is used to enhance or subvert individual privacy. This is especially true on the Web, where open source technologies are behind much of what we interact with and use on a daily basis. As the most fundamental aspects of our lives become networked -- social relationships, work, finance, and even how we get our food -- how can we make sure that open source technologies foster a sense of trust with users, protect their privacy, and still give data scientists the tools they need to gain insight?
Culture
Steven Walling

* Distributed Agile Development or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Remoties

This is the story of how the mobile web engineering team at the Wikimedia Foundation became an extremely high-functioning and successful agile team: by embracing - rather than shying away from - a distributed model. This talk will explore the agile team's journey and how we cope with the inherent tension of remoteness and the agile principle, 'The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation'.
Culture
Arthur Richards

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* From navel gazing to ass kicking: Building leadership in the journalism code community

Amidst all the hand wringing surrounding the "future of journalism," developers, designers, and data geeks working in newsrooms are building projects and tools that engage readers and ripple across the web. We'll discuss ways this community welcomes, supports, and promotes new members and leaders.
Culture
Erika Owens

* From the Bottom Up: Building Community-Owned and -Operated Mesh Networks

This panel highlights the work of a few folks representing part of a broad, international movement consisting of network engineers, community change makers, researchers, architects, and thinkers who are building decentralized and autonomous communications infrastructure. We know that the Internet is deeply broken, and we are rebuilding, from the inside out. We mitigate the ills of interception and interference on the net by facilitating networks that are owned, operated, and governed by the people that use them.
Culture
Jenny Ryan, Mitar Milutinovic, Marc Juul, Russell Senior

* Generational Relay: Passing the Open Source Torch

People leave Open Source projects, and that's ok. Failing to plan for it isn't. How one community is recovering from the loss of its first generation and preparing for the rise of its third.
Culture
Eric Steele

* Get more contributors! Lessons from the Drupal Ladder.

A small contributor pool is a recipe for burnout and can harm or hold back your project. Learn how offering a structured approach for step-by-step skill-building can combat imposter syndrome and build community, thereby increasing the number and diversity of your project's contributors.
Culture
Rhys Fureigh

* Hold on to Your Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Introduction to Sphinx & Read the Docs

Learn more about how to document your software projects with the most powerful open source documentation tool. You'll learn more about how to think about semantics in documentation, and how to use these tools to make great looking documentation.
Chemistry
Eric Holscher

* IPv6 for Programmers

IPv4 is running out of addresses. IPv6 is the Internet Protocol which gives plenty of addresses for the future. It is starting to be deployed widely and open source applications and programming languages need to support it.
Chemistry
Ian Burrell

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Learn you some Lisp for Great Good

Lisp is a wise sage atop a snowy mountain, waiting for students to climb and level up their programming prowess. Pray tell, how does one scale such lofty peaks? This session introduces Lisp for twenty-first century programmers.
Chemistry
Howard Abrams

* Making language selection smarter in Wikipedia

It’s time to make Wikipedia language selection smarter -- to offer a user languages he/she actually wants to see in an article, and in an efficient way. In this talk we shall learn about : 1.The need for a compact language selector 2.How we achieved it in an Outreach Program for Women project. 3.What criteria we use to determine which languages might be most useful to a user, and why 4.How we implemented the feature 5.What concerns we heard from the Wikimedia community about this project 6.How everyone can help pitch in to make this project a success
Chemistry
Niharika Kohli, Sucheta Ghoshal

* Making your mobile web app accessible

Accessibility - It's important. Learn how to make your mobile web app accessible to everyone.
Cooking
Eitan Isaacson

* Making Your Privacy Software Usable

Privacy enhancing technologies (PETs), like onion routing, PGP, and OTR often achieve a high level of security, but user experience (UX) built on top of the protocols is often a development afterthought. Without a concerted effort to examine how the system is used, people accidentally compromise their data or never attempt to use PETs. This talk will show you PET design done right and wrong through the lens of standard UX evaluation techniques. Our goal is to enable you to incorporate UX principles into your hacking from day 0.
Chemistry
Jen Davidson, Sean McGregor

* OpenStreetWhat? Mapping The World With Open Data

Come learn about OpenStreetMap, a Wikipedia-like project with over one million contributors aiming to map the entire world. We'll talk about the project, the data, and how to do some cool things with it.
Cooking
Justin Miller, Rafa Gutierrez

* Patents are for babies: what every engineer should know about IP law

Don't leave IP law to the lawyers! Intellectual property law is a minefield wrapped in straightjacket sprinkled with arsenic-laced gumdrops. Invented for lawyers by lawyers, IP law makes many engineers resentful and dismissive. And yet most of us don't know enough about the details to protect ourselves and our own creations. This session will increase your understanding of how copyrights, patents, trademarks, trade secrets, and open source licensing protect you, your code, your company, and your community.
Business
Belinda Runkle

* Random

If you want to understand randomness better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Replacing `import` with `accio`: Compiling Pythons with Custom Grammar for the sake of a joke

In Python, overwriting builtin functions is fairly easy. You can even do it in the interpreter! But can you overwrite a statement, like import, just as easily? Let's go on an adventure, discovering how the import statement works, and how Python statements are defined in the CPython source code. We'll face some consequences of bootstrapping, and, to get our custom Harry Potter-themed Grammar to work, we'll have to compile a Python to compile a Python.
Chemistry
Amy Hanlon

* Slytherin 101: How To Win Friends and Influence People

Do you wish that you were better at getting people to do what you need them to do? Do you keep getting put in charge of things and then get stuck wondering how the heck you're supposed to get things done? Do you keep getting into conflicts with other people because of stuff you've said, and you aren't entirely sure why? Fortunately, Slytherin House has you covered. Come to this talk and learn the basics of how to hack human relationships, using the tools of cunning and ambition to achieve inter-House harmony. As long as you promise not to use these techniques to support the next Dark Lord, of course.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* SQL Utility Belt

SQL is an incredibly powerful language, but it can be difficult sometimes to advance beyond the basics. In this session, we will go over several tricks and tips to expand your SQL tool kit.
Cooking
Michael Alan Brewer

* Stop Crying in the Bathroom and Start Your Own Business

The tech industry has a 'diversity problem' and companies are courting women, people of color and other marginalized people as the pressure mounts to hire someone besides 24-year-old cis, straight white male programmers. However, for many marginalized people, working in startups, agencies, and large tech companies can be a miserable, demoralizing experience that literally results in crying in the bathroom. There's more to life than startups. Come hear ideas for making your own path in the tech industry, without compromising your dignity or your mental health.
Business
Kronda Adair

* The Case for Junior Developers

Are you passionate about building tech, but think there is no place in your organization for junior developers? Come explore the true costs and benefits of hiring junior developers and see how you can improve your company while helping juniors become the best developers they can be.
Culture
Shawna Scott

* The Outreach Program for Women: what works & what's next

We've mentored and interned in the Outreach Program for Women, and we know it works -- it improves the gender balance inside open source communities. We'll discuss why it works, how it builds off of Google Summer of Code, and discuss replicating it, expanding it, and looking at the next step in the recruiting and inclusion pipeline.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Liz Henry

* Utilizing open source medical systems to reach the next 33 million

There is an increase in double burden of diseases in developing countries accruing from the rise of non communicable and infectious diseases. This situation is worsened by lack of adequate financing, inadequate infrastructure for delivering health care, low health literacy and inadequate personnel. Health information systems drive the global health agenda , and huge investments are continuously being made to bridge the digital divide to improve health care delivery. 1. What are the opportunities to effectively deploy open source technologies in developing countries? 2. How do we create ownership, partnerships and collaborations that support scaling open source medical records system 3. What are the effective design thinking techniques that drive development of open source record systems
Business
judy wawira

* Working Effectively with People in Government on Open Source Projects

Ever thought about ways to use your open source skills to improve your city? In this session we'll talk about successful models for working with people in government, from pitching your project, communicating effectively, finding experts, tracking down data, to launching in the community.
Culture
Jason Denizac

* Write an Excellent Programming Blog

As a member of the open source community, do you contribute only code, or also words? Writing about programming benefits yourself and others. This talk outlines solid article structures, suggests topics to write about, explains how blogging about programming is special, and inspires you to write articles of enduring value.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Failure and Wikipedia: how encyclopedias work

This talk is about my experience with promoting Wikipedia in Indian languages, OpenGLAM projects in India and the problems I've encountered. I also want to draw parallels to how the encyclopedia project itself, especially online works on notions of rough consensus, thereby articulating a specific political position for the community and reflecting a world view through the knowledge they produce.
Culture
noopur raval

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Quantitative community management

In this talk, you will learn the state of the art in community measurement, common mistakes made in surveying, and how to actively use data to improve activity within a project.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Quick Cure for the Shame of Untested Software

As the founder of a company focused on software testing, I speak often to developers who admit in private: "Yes, testing is important... but we don't test." Reasons vary, but the basic problem is that testing is seen as too difficult and time-consuming with no apparent value for the effort. In this talk I hope to convince you that this problem is a false dilemma and show you how to get started testing software quickly and easily.
Cooking
Daniel Nichter

* Remote Pair Programming

Remote Pair Programming: my setup, some advice, and a live demo^H^H stress test
Cooking
Sam Livingston-Gray

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Zero to root in 12 months / How We Mentor “Rock Star” Students

The OSU Open Source Lab (OSUOSL) and PSU Computer Action Team (theCAT) provides an amazing program for undergraduate students to learn about system administration. Many of our students have moved on and created their own successful startups and have changed the landscape of open source themselves. This session will cover how OSUOSL and theCAT mentor our students and create rock stars in the industry.
Culture
William Van Hevelingen, Kenneth Lett, Lance Albertson, Spencer Krum