Sean McGregor's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* A short examination on the intersection of security and usability (or How usable security could save us all)

This talk is geared for people with minimal experience with usability and some experience with security
Chemistry
Morgan Miller

* Advanced Javascript Basics for Web Developers

Javascript is a necessity for modern web development. Whether it is to add more interactivity to your user interface, or provide a client to interact with your API, chances are, even if you're trying to avoid working in javascript, you're working in javascript. Projects like Coffeescript and Opal, while useful, still do not help understand the javascript outputted by these compile-able languages. One growing concern in this realm is that an application's javascript can sometimes be a security concern, easily exploited by a malicious user. In order to catch these concerns, you must know what your javascript does, inside and out. This talk will illustrate concepts to make sure your client code is secure, while still giving your team the flexibility it needs to keep building your stellar app!
Chemistry
Lauren Voswinkel

* Build your own exobrain

Online services like "If This Then That" (IFTTT) are great for automating your life. However they provide limited ways for the end-user to add their own services, and often require credentials that one may normally wish to keep secret. The 'exobrain' project allows for service integration and extension on a machine *you* control.
Cooking
Paul Fenwick

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor

* Data Wrangling: Getting Started Working with Data for Visualizations

Good data visualization allows us to leverage the incredible pattern-recognition abilities of the human brain to answer questions we care about. But how do you make a good visualization? Here's a crash course.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan

* Data, Privacy, & Trust in Open Source: 10 Lessons from Wikipedia

Few people today are not concerned with the way data is used to enhance or subvert individual privacy. This is especially true on the Web, where open source technologies are behind much of what we interact with and use on a daily basis. As the most fundamental aspects of our lives become networked -- social relationships, work, finance, and even how we get our food -- how can we make sure that open source technologies foster a sense of trust with users, protect their privacy, and still give data scientists the tools they need to gain insight?
Culture
Steven Walling

* Deconstructing Open Source Contributions

Everyone wants to make contributing to open source projects more accessible and fun. But how do we do that? One way is to analyze past contributions to identify potential obstacles and opportunities for intervention and support. This workshop will use our own experiences as contributors to explore how the process works, using a simple but effective reflective activity.
Culture
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* DIY User Research for Open Source Projects

Open source is only about open code, right? Wrong. Interviews, questionnaires, quick usability tests, and many other research types all have a place in the open source development process. With a few easy steps and a set of scripts to follow, your community can make user research an easy and essential component of your open source project.
Culture
Erin Richey

* Hold on to Your Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Intro to the IndieWeb: How Far Can We Go?

What happens when an online service you use freezes your account, loses your data, or goes out of business? Have you ever used a service by a company that suddenly went under, stranding your data? Do you own your own identity or does somebody else? What happened to the web in 2003, and how did we get where we are today? This talk will teach you how to post on your own site and optionally syndicate to other sites (POSSE), how to authenticate with your own domain (IndieAuth) and steps to take data ownership back into your own hands.
Chemistry
Amber Case

* Know Thy Neighbor: Scikit and the K-Nearest Neighbor Algorithm

This presentation will give a brief overview of machine learning, the k-nearest neighbor algorithm and Scikit-learn. Sometimes developers need to make decisions, even when they don't have all of the required information. Machine learning attempts to solve this problem by using known data (a training data sample) to make predictions about the unknown. For example, usually a user doesn't tell Amazon explicitly what type of book they want to read, but based on the user's purchasing history, and the user's demographic, Amazon is able to induce what the user might like to read.
Cooking
Portia Burton

* Making Your Privacy Software Usable

Privacy enhancing technologies (PETs), like onion routing, PGP, and OTR often achieve a high level of security, but user experience (UX) built on top of the protocols is often a development afterthought. Without a concerted effort to examine how the system is used, people accidentally compromise their data or never attempt to use PETs. This talk will show you PET design done right and wrong through the lens of standard UX evaluation techniques. Our goal is to enable you to incorporate UX principles into your hacking from day 0.
Chemistry
Jen Davidson, Sean McGregor

* Modern Home Automation

There are a few different options available to you to control your home automation system. Many manufacturers make it convenient to use their system by not only making a convenient to install their products and use their interface, but will actually host all the software portions for you. Many provide apps for your IOS or Android device and have web interfaces for your laptop as well, making the control of these devices very streamlined and simple, especially if there are many devices to be managed. Other more DIY-approach solutions also have interfaces to control your automation, although require a bit more setup. For example, with the power strip in the previous example, you first need to connect it to your wireless network, and then you'll be able to use the supplied phone/tablet app to toggle the ports on/off. As with anything DIY: The sky's the limit, although it requires more technical understanding of what's going on.
Cooking
Ben Kero

* My Journey into Open Source Design

Becoming a contributing designer on an open source project is often tougher than contributing code. The pathways to designing for open source projects are often unclear. Using my own experience joining the WordPress project, I'll share how I think open source projects can make it easier for designers to contribute their skills.
Cooking
Mel Choyce

* OAuth, IndieAuth, and the Future of Authorization APIs

You use OAuth every time you log in to Facebook or Twitter, but what if you could use it from your own website? What if your own domain became a source of data, and you had your own personal API? By decentralizing authorization to your own domain instead of a silo, you control when, how, and to whom your data is shared.
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* Open Source is Not Enough: The Importance of Algorithm Transparency

Opaque algorithms increasingly control our access to information, on the web and beyond. Why is that a problem, and what can we do about it?
Culture
Rachel Shadoan

* Random

If you want to understand randomness better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* When Many Eyes Fail You: Tales from Security Standards and Open Source

It's often said that "given many eyes, all bugs are shallow" and open source proponents love to list this as a reason that open source is more secure than its closed-source relatives. While that makes a nice sound bite, the reality of security with many eyeballs doesn't fit so nicely into a tweet. This talk will explore some of the things that surprised me in going from academic security research to industry security research in open source and open standards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* Who broke the code? Finding problems quickly in a quickly evolving opensource project

In this talk, we will overview the 0day kernel test infrastructure, an Intel project where the goal is to ensure the quality of Linux upstream and developmental kernels. The project runs 7x24 tests on bleeding edge code from 300+ kernel git trees.
Chemistry
Timothy Chen