M. Edward (Ed) Borasky's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2016 Birds of a Feather

Favorite proposals for this user

* GIS and Spatial Data for All

Open forum to ask local experts about OS solutions, or just hang out.
Birds of a Feather session 2016-05-17 20:34:12 +0000
david percy

* Live Coding Music / Improv

We have two proposals on the list involving live-coding of music, http://opensourcebridge.org/proposals/1697, which uses ChucK, and http://opensourcebridge.org/proposals/1707, which involves Sonic Pi. Put the two of these together and we could have a laptop orchestra.
Birds of a Feather session 2016-04-12 16:43:41 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Domain Specific Query Language Engine

This presentation is about the shortest line between a database and data exploration.
Theory
Joe Meyer

* A programmers guide to Music.

Imagine a place where Ruby meets Music, its called MAGIC LAND. Music is not a lot different from programming. In this talk we will see how. I will talk about this amazing piece of open-source software called SonicPi. SonicPi is a new kind of musical instrument. Think about it, you write code to make music. And it gets even better, code is written in a ruby DSL. Also I will talk about notes, samples, synth and other musical things SonicPi lets us do it. Don't worry if do not get these terms. When I started, I did not either. But at the end of the talk, you will know how to make music.
Culture
Rishi Jain

* An Ensemble of Programming Languages: How to Build a Platform for Collaboration

The era of "general-purpose programming languages" is nearing its end. The cost of building a programming language and integrating it with other languages has fallen significantly, but our approach to building programming languages has not changed substantially in decades. The consequence is an enormous financial cost paid, in terms of real dollars as well as in hours of programmer effort. The solution is not yet another "better" general-purpose language but rather a platform that prioritizes a collaborating assortment of specialized languages that together perform well in a specific context: an ensemble of programming languages.
Theory
Brian Shirai

* Bots Not Cattle

"Cattle Not Pets" got us to the first generation of microservice infrastructures. Now it's time for a second generation metaphor: "Bots Not Cattle."
Theory
Josh Berkus

* Building a Life with WordPress

If you're dying to stick it to the man, or just looking to make extra money on the side, this talk is for you. We'll explore ways you can leverage the most popular CMS on the planet to start or grow an online business.
Business
Kronda Adair

* Building Prototypes in Code to Iterate Faster

Prototypes are problem-solving tools. They help your team pinpoint problems with your product more clearly and earlier in the design and development process. Building your prototype in code has several advantages over wireframes, mockups, paper prototypes, or even InVison prototypes. They easily allow you to iterate through different solutions before you find what works.
Practice
Caterina Paun

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp

* Creating a Third Wave of Free/Open Source Software

The free/open source software movement is over thirty years old, and has gone through a number of changes in that time, spawning projects large and small (including OpenConferenceWare, which runs this site!). If Free Software is the first generation, and Open Source is the second, current efforts toward creating an inclusive and sustainable world make up a third generation that we can start to form into a broader plan.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Exit Condition: when to ragequit, raise hell, or duck and cover

If you're caught in a job or a project where you simply can't convince your colleagues or organization to treat you with respect, it often feels like you're in a maze with no clear way out. (Un)fortunately, you're not alone. There's no universal solution to navigating a toxic or abusive workplace, but there's power in finding a theoretical context, sharing our stories, and learning from each other. Come learn about the options of voice, loyalty, and exit, and hear the stories of others who have had to make hard choices.
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Introduction to Clojure

Move fast and break things in this 100-minute, introductory-level Clojure workshop!
Practice
Katherine Fellows

* Introduction to Neural Networks with Tensorflow

I intend to introduce Neural Networks as a very simple concept. This can be achieved with Google's newest open-source library in Python called Tensorflow. I want to dispel the myth that Neural Networks are hard to understand and implement. I also want to introduce the current state of Neural Networks as they are continually changing the landscape of visual recognition and natural language processing.
Theory
Nick McClure

* Let’s build a CI/CD pipeline

An exploration of the cost and value of CI/CD, and a walkthrough of setting up a CI/CD pipeline.
Practice
Jean de Klerk

* Machine Learning 101: How to get started with Convolutional Neural Networks

Machine learning and especially convolutional neural networks are on the rise. With the sheer limitless amount of data and cheap computation power, neural networks can now solve problems which have been fairly complex in the past. Cole and Hannes will demonstrate how you implement a convolutional neural network with a few lines of Python code to classify images, recognize voices or understand texts.
Theory
Hannes Hapke, Cole Howard

* Micro-services provide some benefits, but at what cost?

Several years ago, there was an architectural paradigm shift toward "micro-services" and away from the "monolithic" application stack. A micro-service architecture comes with scalability and replaceability, among others, but is it worth the time and effort to build it? Is it worth debugging API calls gone wrong? If you're thinking about making this move, have already started, or have already deployed to production, this is an ideal venue to see what others are doing with micro-services.
Theory
Serge Domkowski

* Open sourced tools for Agent Based Modeling

Agent-based modeling is a technique used to explore both complexity and emergence by simulating individual actors and their actions inside of a system. Think of systems such as the traffic in the city or financial markets where one actor can have an effect on the decisions of others until the system’s direction changes its course. During this survey, you will gain an understanding of open source software available in a variety of languages and how to get started quickly.
Practice
Jackie Kazil

* Rethinking Social Media, Privacy, and Information Flow from the Ground Up

Inspired by security and privacy research in operating systems, we'll be discussing possible ways to redesign privacy models so that all users can have fine-grained control over both visibility of their content and how others can interact with it.
Theory
Clarissa Littler

* Supporting diversity with a new approach to software

It’s time for a new approach to software, one that embraces differences (not just tolerates them), and sees diversity as a strength. The industry is primed for change, and there are huge opportunities to do better by valuing emotion, intuition, compassion, purpose, empowerment, sustainability, and social justice. This highly-interactive session includes discussions of current “best practices” and emerging ideas from projects that have focused heavily on diversity, issues and problems in today’s environment, imagining how things could be different, and figuring out concrete steps to make it happen.
Theory
Jon Pincus, Tammarrian Rogers

* Taking no for an answer

Open source (like many fields) rewards people who are confident and even a bit pushy. So we give talks encouraging folk to get over imposter syndrome, lean in, say yes to more things. But self-improvement shouldn't focus only on our most vulnerable members, but also our most powerful. So let's talk not about saying yes, but about hearing no. Learning to take no for an answer can transform efforts such as security, diversity and mentoring where we have few experts or volunteers and great need. Let's talk about accepting "defeat" with grace, and how to take "no" for an answer while still moving forwards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* Type Theory 101

Have you heard about type theory and always wanted to understand the principles behind it, but always thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of Lambda Calculus and algebras? This talk will approach these concepts in a friendly way.
Theory
Hanneli Tavante

* Unraveling the Masculinization of Technology

Have you ever wondered where the perception that technology is a masculine pursuit comes from? Or why we have to explain that, "no really, women are interested in computers too"?
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* What Hath Von Neumann Wrought? Programming before programming languages

We program today in a rich environment, but that wasn't always the case. We celebrate the pioneers of programming languages: Grace Hopper (COBOL), John Backus (FORTRAN), John McCarthy (LISP), Kenneth Iverson (APL) and Peter Naur (ALGOL). But there was a time before programming languages. How did people program back then? I'll show you!
Theory
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Why you can't afford to miss out on junior developers

What if your next hire could make your team faster, help create a more inclusive and diverse environment, be easy to find, and be super excited to work with you? These people are not unicorns, they're junior developers. Most teams just don't know how to bring them on and get these benefits. Whether you're in a startup, consultancy, or a BigCo, with a few tips and processes, any team can learn how to grow new developers.
Practice
Bracken Mosbacker

Favorite proposals for this user

* A programmers guide to Music.

Imagine a place where Ruby meets Music, its called MAGIC LAND. Music is not a lot different from programming. In this talk we will see how. I will talk about this amazing piece of open-source software called SonicPi. SonicPi is a new kind of musical instrument. Think about it, you write code to make music. And it gets even better, code is written in a ruby DSL. Also I will talk about notes, samples, synth and other musical things SonicPi lets us do it. Don't worry if do not get these terms. When I started, I did not either. But at the end of the talk, you will know how to make music.
Culture 2016-03-16 21:02:52 +0000
Rishi Jain

* Anomaly detection on earthquake data using the Trusted Analytics Platform

Trusted Analytics Platform (TAP) is an open source software, optimized for performance and security, that accelerates the creation of cloud-native applications driven by Big Data Analytics. This talk uses TAP to detect anomalies in earthquake data and indicate any outliers on real time data. http://trustedanalytics.github.io/
Theory 2016-04-21 00:14:43 +0000
Anahita Bhiwandiwalla, Fred Magnotta, Jitendra Patil

* Building community with Twitter chats

The team building community around a book called The Open Organization wanted to see how social media could enhance our efforts. We investigated and successfully used Twitter chats as a way to continue conversation and dialog around what it means to be an open leader. Now it's time to share what we've learned so you can do the same thing for your community.
Practice 2016-03-18 22:14:24 +0000
Jason Hibbets

* Creating a measurable market for desktop applications

The desktop application market has long languished. Even today there is no way to understand the strength of the GNU/Linux desktop application market. This talk will focus on creating a measurable desktop market by focusing on changing the application distribution model using GNOME xdg-app.
Culture 2016-04-11 19:10:50 +0000
Sriram Ramkrishna

* Devopracy: Infrastructure Code for Virtual Democracies

Devopracy is an open source project to build a disposable, portable cloud for civic engagement events and virtual democracies. We'll examine these use cases with consideration for security, maintainability, and code quality. There's a companion workshop on how to deploy the cloud and deploy an application onto it.
Theory 2016-04-21 06:21:42 +0000
Ele Mooney

* Introducing Apache CouchDB 2.0

Apache CouchDB is a document database featuring an HTTP API, JSON documents, and peer-to-peer replication. Take a tour of the upcoming features and improvements in Apache CouchDB 2.0 including clustering capabilities for horizontal scalability and a declarative MongoDB-style ad hoc querying system. This talk should be of interest to you whether you're new to Apache CouchDB or an experienced Apache CouchDB developer.
Practice 2016-04-14 19:26:46 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Machine Ethics and Emerging Technologies

An autonomous car is driving down a single-lane road carved out of a cliff. Unexpectedly, a child runs in front the car chasing a ball, and trips. The car cannot stop in time to avoid a fatal collision, but it can sacrifice itself and its passenger by driving off the cliff. Should it? And if so, would you buy such a car?
Theory 2016-04-14 07:32:44 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Machine Learning Algorithms in R - A Deep Dive

As a major benchmark and trend-setter in machine learning and statistics, R, a free and open source statistical computing language, has much to offer to anyone interested in machine learning, statistics, or numerical computing. In this tutorial, I will share with the audience the vast ecosystem around R, and get the listeners started right away with some of the most widely used machine learning algorithms. You don't have to be a statistician or computer scientist to use R - its concise syntax and expressive nature will only make you want to use it more and more for machine learning and other computing tasks!
Theory 2016-04-21 06:58:47 +0000
Helen Jiang

* Machine Learning: Key Battleground for Open Source Technology

Despite all the attention and buzz, Machine learning(ML) is woefully overlooked in the community of free and open source technology. In this presentation, I will examine the still prevalent proprietary legacy of ML, introduce the current open source stack of ML development and applications, and evaluate new proprietary attempts entering ML. Then, I will share with you the strategy recipes that we may need, in a battle to keep the booming field of ML free and open source.
Culture 2016-04-14 06:53:01 +0000
Helen Jiang

* Open source GIS smackdown

We'll run a few of the popular open source GIS software apps through some head to head exercises to see which ones can do what needs to be done.
Practice 2016-04-21 05:12:26 +0000
david percy

* Opensource.com Lightning Talks

Opensource.com is excited to host a lightning-fast hour at Open Source Bridge.
Practice 2016-04-06 21:13:03 +0000
Jason Hibbets

* The JSON-Driven Schema

Learn how to use Postgres to explore a JSON data set.
Practice 2016-04-12 16:58:07 +0000
Jason Owen

* The open source GIS stack

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) has a stable of applications and technologies to make your mapping effective and fun. We'll explore some of the most popular apps.
Practice 2016-04-21 05:06:50 +0000
david percy

* Topic modeling with LDA, what, how and why

Non-centroid clustering increasingly is seeing need in data analytics as more complex models arise. Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) is one such solution to a clustering problem known as topic modeling. In this talk we discuss what topic modeling is, why conventional techniques don't yield useful results and how LDA solves this issue.
Theory 2016-04-13 06:20:39 +0000
Lewis Coates

* When Harry Met Iannis 2016

Iannis Xenakis passed away on February 4, 2001. When he arrived in Heaven, he sought out his mentor, Olivier Messiaen. Messiaen said, “Iannis, there’s someone here I want you to meet.” The two walked over to a small sidewalk cafe, and there sat Harry Partch. And so from this fanciful meeting in Heaven, “When Harry Met Iannis” was born. Now I'm not a carpenter like Partch was, and I don't have access to conductors or orchestras like Xenakis did, so I'll have to synthesize instruments and performers. The software that makes this possible is an open-source language called ChucK. I'll talk a bit about the Partch music theory, Xenakis' use of game theory and the ChucK language. But mostly, this talk is about the music and not the tools that made it. And you'll be the first to hear "When Harry Met Iannis 2016" in its entirety.
Practice 2016-03-15 03:35:20 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* "R" You Ready for Some Football? Hacking Fantasy Sports with Open Source Software

You've probably heard about "robot jounalism" - computers writing finance and sports stories. Well, there's just one teensy little problem with robots writing finance and sports stories: investors and fantasy sports gamers don't want the data turned into text! They want their data raw, right and fast. They need clean, timely data to make objective decisions using tried-and-true statistical methodologies. So I'm not going to talk about robot journalism - I'm going to talk about fantasy sports: getting the data, analyzing it and using statistical decision-making tools to enhance the probability of winning.
Hacks
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* A Profile of Performance Profiling With pprof

When our code is slow, performance gains can often difficult to obtain. Our ideas of where to focus our attention are often wrong. pprof has become my go to tool, and it's easy to see why. Together we'll learn how to understand pprof's output to help us zero in on the parts of our code that need the most love.
Cooking
Lauren Voswinkel

* Aesthetics and the Evolution of Code

Elegance is an aesthetic experience. It’s about perfectly conforming to a set of imperfect standards, meeting a need with no extraneous lines or rough edges. Elegance in code is the result of a mysterious process, just as elegance in nature is— in the case of nature, the process is evolution.
Culture
Coraline Ada Ehmke

* Community Public Offerings: A New Way to Engage Markets (and Investors) in Oregon

Community Public what? This session will introduce the Community Public Offering - the vehicle for securities crowdfunding enabled by Oregon law this January (2015).
Business
kristin wolff, Simon Love

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Developer and the DOM - A history of manipulation and abstraction

As web developers we see a variety of tools evolve every year that all claim to be the future of web development, but few people are as excited to explore the past. In this talk we’ll trace the lineage of the contemporary web landscape back to the advent of the DOM and the first browser javascript API. In doing so we hope to illuminate an often overlooked historical perspective on web development and explain why frameworks like React and Angular came into existence and why today is an exciting time to be working with the browser.
Chemistry
Zachary Michael, Gregory Noack

* Dog Food is for Dogs: Escape the Crate of Your Perspective with User Research

Dogfooding—using your own products—is nice, but is it sufficient to produce good design for people who aren’t you? Our familiarity with our projects and their quirks makes us poor substitutes for users in the wild. So just who are these users, and how do you incorporate them into design and development? In this workshop, we'll explore user experience design and research strategies that will help you design for people who aren’t you.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan, amelia abreu

* For Love and For Money

Let’s talk about the work we want to do, the work we have to do, and how we might create systems that don’t continue to force bad choices between building community, technical work, and diversity activism.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* How you tell the story matters: telling better stories and making better technologies

What happens when we tell stories? How do we tell stories about the technology we build, why do some stories get told over others? How do we talk about our successes, and how do we not talk about our failures? Whose stories get heard: how do women, people of color, disabled people, and “non-technical” workers get left out of the stories we hear? In this talk, I'll explore the role of storytelling in technology, and share what I've found about telling better stories.
Business
amelia abreu

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Introduction to data munging with pandas and IPython Notebook

This talk will go over importing, exploring, and exporting your data, and common issues you may encounter.
Cooking
Meli Lewis

* Learning and Knowing with Federated Wiki

@AlysonIndrunas RT @Bali_Maha's wonderful beautiful thoughtful #fedwiki succinct summary "it is a new approach to looking at knowledge we construct together"
Culture
Ward Cunningham

* Leveraging Docker to Enable Learning

When giving workshops or presenting online tutorials, it's frequently the case that the system setup can take longer than the actual learning exercises. Using Docker to provide a learning sandbox solves this problem while avoiding changing the learner's system in potentially destructive ways.
Cooking
Kirsten Hunter

* Making Docker Actually Work

Workflow and tools to make Docker work the way it should, in production and in development
Cooking
Simon McFarlane

* Making the web fun again

When Geocities shut down, it did much more than delete a bunch of obnoxious dancing baby GIFs and Limp Bizkit MIDI files. It deleted the ability for people to easily create web sites, and learn how to be in complete control of the content and presentation they provide to their audience. To the economically and socially disenfranchised, it was a disaster that prevented countless people from learning programming. So we brought it back, and open sourced the entire thing (including our financial data). Leave your nostalgia at the door - let us show you our efforts to pave a better future for tech startups, the tech community, and the future of the web itself.
Culture
Kyle Drake, Victoria Wang

* Micropub: The Emerging API Standard for IndieWeb Apps

Micropub is an emerging open API standard that is used to create posts on your own domain using third-party apps. Web apps and mobile apps can use Micropub to post notes, photos, bookmarks and many other kinds of posts to your own website, similar to using a Twitter client to post to your Twitter account.
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Open Source Tools for Scientific Research

Come learn about open science and the tools available for modern scientific research.
Chemistry
Amy Boyle

* Opening Up The Current Open Source Blueprint

Accessibility, diversity, and open source holding itself accountable to its own standards of what it means to be an open community.
Culture
Stephanie Morillo

* Reinventing black boxes

Open source has a long history of reimplementing, and reverse engineering proprietary tools. This talk will integrate the tools needed to reverse engineer into stories of how it has been done before.
Hacks
Daniel Johnson

* Removing Barriers: Ascend Project Post Mortem

Last year the Ascend Project was announced, then in the fall the first pilot took place in Portland. This year we'll report back on how it went, hear from participants, and break down what worked and what could be changed for future versions of this type of program. You'll definitely come away with some ideas for your next learning event, code school, or sponsored training.
Hacks
Lukas Blakk, Kronda Adair

* The Open Source Writing Stack

Open source makes writing and publishing much easier both online and in print — provided you know what tools to use. This talk covers those tools (from LaTeX to WordPress) and how to choose between them.
Hacks
Thursday Bram

* Using Julia & D3 to analyse web performance data

If you've always wanted to play around with D3 or Julia, or both, this talk will get you up to speed very quickly. Using web performance data as the vehicle, and an aim to extract meaningful information from it, we will explore both Julia and D3 and come up with some fun visualizations that may not be possible using only one of these tools.
Chemistry
Philip Tellis

* What's in a name? Phonetic Algorithms for Search and Similarity

Search can be as simple as returning a word or part of word based on character similarity. LIKE and wildcard matches can be sufficient, but can only account for character or string matching, and fail on misspelled words or names. Phonetic algorithms can help us find matches for misspellings and typo'd user data.
Chemistry
Mercedes Coyle

* Why Making a Programming Language is Awesome

Learn about the journey of creating Wake, a modern programming language
Hacks
Michael R Fairhurst

* You Got Your Idris in My C++! A First Look at Denotational Design

Programmers gripe that we have two kinds of programming languages: the ones we write in for fun, and the ones we write in because we have to. We may enjoy coding that weekend project in Agda, but we have to leave that smile behind on Monday morning when we go back to Java or C++. But is that really the case? Or can we find a way of bringing the expressiveness, the rigor, or the fun of our favorite languages into our day jobs?
Chemistry
Ian Dees

Favorite proposals for this user

* 90 writing tips in 45 minutes

Almost every job involves a little writing, even if it's code comments or repair notes on a car. But what if you don't feel confident with writing? I have a rapid-fire presentation of writing tips and tricks that can help get you started, keep you going, and make your work better, even if you don't think you're a writer, I bet it will help!
Hacks 2015-01-20 02:50:35 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Better Project Planning Through User Story Mapping

Learn how to improve your agile development process through User Story Mapping, a technique that you can use to gather requirements easier, get everyone on the same page, and plan out what needs to be done while keeping the "big picture" in mind.
Business 2015-02-09 21:42:45 +0000
Andrew Havens

* Could Spambots Exist in Victorian England? and other questions about technology, society, and communication

As a tool for human communication, the internet has successes and failures. It allows us to meet people, collaborate, strengthen communities, and learn new things. It also enables oppression, harassment, and noise. These problems aren't new, but choices made in constructing the internet have often served to blindly facilitate their spread. Instead of continuing to assume that the technical, social, and economic constraints that kept such problems from destroying past systems will continue to hold, let's break down what's different from then to now, and find a new set of solutions.
Hacks 2015-02-25 04:35:16 +0000
Audrey Eschright

* Don't hide: The AGPL as a business model

When you want to make a living from your app, open sourcing can be a difficult decision. What if... my future customers just find out they could rather use the software for free instead of paying us? What if... a service company takes on my product and delivers a better service than we do, after all they have more customer experience than us?
Business 2015-03-06 17:07:28 +0000
Henri Binsztok

* Geeks and the News Cycle

Large news entities - like Gawker and Huffington Post - that cater to casual and regular consumers get some of their most popular news stories from places like Reddit, Twitter, and HackerNews. Their news stories are sourced by the user generated content of these sites - the commons if you will - they digest them, and then profit from the advertising income. This talk will look into how this consumer-newsgiant-consumer dynamic treats the communities that it benefits from, how the 'merit' of news stories' ranking on popularity competition sites like reddit relate to the meritocracy in tech, and how people react to suddenly being at the center of a media storm.
Culture 2015-01-28 04:20:33 +0000
Simon Vansintjan

* Keep calm, it's reverse engineering time

As developers, sometimes we have to investigate a bug, or add a new feature in a codebase that is completely new to us, often with no one available to ask anything about that code. How can we do this?
Cooking 2015-03-07 10:37:03 +0000
Alissa Bonas

* Machine Learning at Scale: Using Apache Spark and MLlib

A common problem of working with large sets of data is that machine learning tools are not able to scale effectively. Apache Spark is a fast, cluster computing engine that provides a rich toolset for machine learning called MLlib, which solves this problem of scaling.
Chemistry 2015-03-06 23:44:47 +0000
Sarah Guido

* Making music with Free/Libre/Open tools

The range of options for music-making on GNU/Linux with free/libre/open tools stretches from music-focused programming languages like CSound and PureData to simple tools like Audacity, Ardour, Guitarix, Hydrogen, and Musescore which are accessible to novice members of the general public. We'll explore the options for different sorts of musical creativity, focusing on the basic tools and how to get them set up effectively on GNU/Linux. In the session, we'll produce some brief compositions and recordings as we explore the software.
Hacks 2015-03-08 05:00:14 +0000
Aaron Wolf

* Mastering Bootstrap: how to get the most out of Bootstrap by writing modular CSS themes

Take Bootstrap to the next level by learning how to setup a development environment with harp.js, setup a Less variable and mixin library, make your theme modular, and deploy your theme for use on your projects or for sale on a marketplace.
Cooking 2015-01-11 08:36:42 +0000
Matt Lambert

* Objectivity is a Myth: Your Data is Not Objective and Neither Are You

Data is often treated as an impartial representation of reality--an unbiased delivery mechanism for "ground truth". Data collection, however, is designed by people, whose knowledge and beliefs influence the design decisions they make. How does that impact what we think we know, and how can we adapt our processes to account for it?
Culture 2015-03-08 01:37:51 +0000
Rachel Shadoan

* Open Power: Electoral Reform and Public Empowerment

“When we relate and share knowledge authentically, this places us in a state of grace, a state of 'win-win' harmony with all others, and establishes trust among all.” “The bottom line is that our government is not intelligent about how it pursues the public interest, because its decisions are not informed decisions (and its interest is generally not the public's).” “I realized in 1988 that my life as a spy specializing in secrets was not only unproductive, it was in sharp opposition to what we actually need: full access to true information, and consequently, the ability to create Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT).”
Culture 2015-01-20 14:59:38 +0000
Robert David Steele

* Pop Open a Kernel

Ever wanted to build a simple kernel for a small computer? Curious how an OS starts and how it communicates with your keyboard and screen? Together, we'll build a simple arm kernel from scratch. No experience in assembly language or knowledge about CPU architecture is required, just some basic knowledge of C/C++ and curiosity about how things work under the hood.
Cooking 2015-03-12 02:54:04 +0000
Ian Kronquist

* Roll Your Own Platform as a Service with Docker

What Are a Platform’s Components? * Builders/Packagers that create a deployable artifact * Artifact repositories to hold the deployable artifact * Provisioners that spin-up new services * Hosts that run a deployable artifact * Routers/Load balancers to * Direct traffic from the public to their nearest/most available application servers * Load-balancers/reverse-proxies/service discovery to * Route traffic from an application server to composing services * Slowly ramp-up load as a new version of a service is deployed
Hacks 2015-01-22 19:12:45 +0000
Zee Spencer

* Science Writing for the Small Screen with Osjourno-Webapplate

Science writers targeting the small screen are faced with a number of challenges. To address them, I've developed a workflow centered on RMarkdown authoring tools and the Mozilla Webapplate web app deployment framework.
Cooking 2015-03-08 03:24:05 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Stuck in the MUD: Writing a Scalable & Asynchronous TCP Server in Ruby

An introduction of CarbonMU, my new open-source Ruby MUD platform, and Celluloid, the underlying Ruby concurrent/actor-based programming framework.
Chemistry 2015-03-07 00:41:49 +0000
Tim Krajcar

* Success is Bigger Than Not Failing: A passionate plea for criteria

We talk a lot about minimum viable products, and building our products up from small features. We talk a lot about failure, and how to learn from it and not replicate failures over and over again. But what I haven’t heard a lot of discussion about is how we know we’ve succeeded. Is it market share? Usable product? Could understanding and setting a measurable, achievable goals help us overcome imposter syndrome, second sock syndrome, and feature creep?
Hacks 2015-02-25 06:25:24 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Talmudic Maxims to Maximize Your Growth as a Developer

You’ve been programming for a while now. You’re beginning to feel that you’ve got a handle on things but at the same time can’t escape the feeling that you’ve somehow plateaued in your growth as a software developer. In this talk Yitzchok, a rabbinic scholar and software developer, shares the “wisdom of the sages” as practical, actionable advice – strategies and tactics – that you can use to reinvigorate your growth as a software developer.
Culture 2015-02-27 16:41:28 +0000
Yitzchok Willroth

* Techniques and Tools for Literate DevOps

Lacking the Hermetic knowledge required to administrate servers, we take judicious notes and hyperlinks. Why not combine those written thoughts with the commands we enter to configure and tame our digital beasties? We have a tool for that.
Cooking 2015-02-07 04:41:11 +0000
Howard Abrams, Kasey Alusi

* The Dead Language Fallacy

Our precious programming languages are being struck with a plague. Each year another language is declared dead or dying. But is that true or simply the tech equivalent of tabloid reporting?
Culture 2015-03-07 21:17:21 +0000
VM Brasseur

* The End of JS Frameworks: ES6 and Web Components

JavaScript has a long history of being difficult to structure and maintain. To deal with this complexity a swath of frameworks have emerged over the years. At a glacial pace we have seen the web improve and those changes are ubiquitous now. ES6 and web components are happening! Come to this talk to learn how to get started with vanilla web platform code.
Hacks 2015-01-21 19:16:48 +0000
Brian LeRoux

* The Github Guitar: Your Mobile Browser as a Distributed Musical Instrument

Almost everyone has a smartphone, and the majority can run Chrome or Safari. Wouldn't it be great if we could use our mobile devices as tools to allow non-musicians in on the act of performing... by generating harmonious tones or presenting lyrics in time with musicians playing traditional instruments? What if we could synchronize multimedia events over dozens if not thousands of devices, simultaneously? Well, we can! The technology exists today, in your pocket. The singalong.js suite enables these types of ad-hoc musical collaborations in various combinations, in real time, with no perceptible latency, and without the use of a click track or other such draconian control system. The best thing is, it’s licensed under the GPL and uses lots of open libraries to make it happen.
Hacks 2015-02-20 19:07:29 +0000
Ross Brackett

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* Badging and Beyond: Rubrics and Building a Culture of Recognition as Community Building Strategies

What are the qualities you need more of in your open source community?
Culture
Larissa Shapiro

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Advanced Javascript Basics for Web Developers

Javascript is a necessity for modern web development. Whether it is to add more interactivity to your user interface, or provide a client to interact with your API, chances are, even if you're trying to avoid working in javascript, you're working in javascript. Projects like Coffeescript and Opal, while useful, still do not help understand the javascript outputted by these compile-able languages. One growing concern in this realm is that an application's javascript can sometimes be a security concern, easily exploited by a malicious user. In order to catch these concerns, you must know what your javascript does, inside and out. This talk will illustrate concepts to make sure your client code is secure, while still giving your team the flexibility it needs to keep building your stellar app!
Chemistry
Lauren Voswinkel

* Data Wrangling: Getting Started Working with Data for Visualizations

Good data visualization allows us to leverage the incredible pattern-recognition abilities of the human brain to answer questions we care about. But how do you make a good visualization? Here's a crash course.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan

* DIY User Research for Open Source Projects

Open source is only about open code, right? Wrong. Interviews, questionnaires, quick usability tests, and many other research types all have a place in the open source development process. With a few easy steps and a set of scripts to follow, your community can make user research an easy and essential component of your open source project.
Culture
Erin Richey

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk

* From navel gazing to ass kicking: Building leadership in the journalism code community

Amidst all the hand wringing surrounding the "future of journalism," developers, designers, and data geeks working in newsrooms are building projects and tools that engage readers and ripple across the web. We'll discuss ways this community welcomes, supports, and promotes new members and leaders.
Culture
Erika Owens

* From the Bottom Up: Building Community-Owned and -Operated Mesh Networks

This panel highlights the work of a few folks representing part of a broad, international movement consisting of network engineers, community change makers, researchers, architects, and thinkers who are building decentralized and autonomous communications infrastructure. We know that the Internet is deeply broken, and we are rebuilding, from the inside out. We mitigate the ills of interception and interference on the net by facilitating networks that are owned, operated, and governed by the people that use them.
Culture
Jenny Ryan, Mitar Milutinovic, Marc Juul, Russell Senior

* Introduction to Sphinx & Read the Docs

Learn more about how to document your software projects with the most powerful open source documentation tool. You'll learn more about how to think about semantics in documentation, and how to use these tools to make great looking documentation.
Chemistry
Eric Holscher

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Making your mobile web app accessible

Accessibility - It's important. Learn how to make your mobile web app accessible to everyone.
Cooking
Eitan Isaacson

* Making Your Privacy Software Usable

Privacy enhancing technologies (PETs), like onion routing, PGP, and OTR often achieve a high level of security, but user experience (UX) built on top of the protocols is often a development afterthought. Without a concerted effort to examine how the system is used, people accidentally compromise their data or never attempt to use PETs. This talk will show you PET design done right and wrong through the lens of standard UX evaluation techniques. Our goal is to enable you to incorporate UX principles into your hacking from day 0.
Chemistry
Jen Davidson, Sean McGregor

* OAuth, IndieAuth, and the Future of Authorization APIs

You use OAuth every time you log in to Facebook or Twitter, but what if you could use it from your own website? What if your own domain became a source of data, and you had your own personal API? By decentralizing authorization to your own domain instead of a silo, you control when, how, and to whom your data is shared.
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* Open Source is Not Enough: The Importance of Algorithm Transparency

Opaque algorithms increasingly control our access to information, on the web and beyond. Why is that a problem, and what can we do about it?
Culture
Rachel Shadoan

* Open source software could save libraries! Maybe!

There are opportunities for open source to help save the day for libraries, ending many of librarians' and library users' woes.
Business
Coral Sheldon-Hess

* Patents are for babies: what every engineer should know about IP law

Don't leave IP law to the lawyers! Intellectual property law is a minefield wrapped in straightjacket sprinkled with arsenic-laced gumdrops. Invented for lawyers by lawyers, IP law makes many engineers resentful and dismissive. And yet most of us don't know enough about the details to protect ourselves and our own creations. This session will increase your understanding of how copyrights, patents, trademarks, trade secrets, and open source licensing protect you, your code, your company, and your community.
Business
Belinda Runkle

* Power Tuning Linux: A Case Study

In this talk we will do a reality-check in terms of the power consumption on off-the-shelve systems running “out of the box” Linux distributions.
Chemistry
Alexandra Yates

* Stop Crying in the Bathroom and Start Your Own Business

The tech industry has a 'diversity problem' and companies are courting women, people of color and other marginalized people as the pressure mounts to hire someone besides 24-year-old cis, straight white male programmers. However, for many marginalized people, working in startups, agencies, and large tech companies can be a miserable, demoralizing experience that literally results in crying in the bathroom. There's more to life than startups. Come hear ideas for making your own path in the tech industry, without compromising your dignity or your mental health.
Business
Kronda Adair

* The Case for Junior Developers

Are you passionate about building tech, but think there is no place in your organization for junior developers? Come explore the true costs and benefits of hiring junior developers and see how you can improve your company while helping juniors become the best developers they can be.
Culture
Shawna Scott

Favorite proposals for this user

* An Introduction to Dependent Types and Proving Your Code Correct

This will be an introduction to dependently typed programming, the Curry-Howard correspondence, and using your type system as a proof system for showing that your code is correct all done in the programming language Agda.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 00:58:09 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Applied Machine Learning

Are you intrigued by Machine Learning but don’t know how to actually use it? This talk will focus on a specific case, solving a large scale Entity Resolution (De-Duplication) problem with an open source Support Vector Machine (SVM).
Cooking 2014-04-05 05:19:59 +0000
Clayton McClure

* Bonnie and Vinson Help with Data Visualization

Everyone and their dog are turning out graphs of social networks. My helpers are Bonnie and Vinson. With their help I will construct visualizations of interesting data using R and its libraries.
Chemistry 2014-04-02 23:18:49 +0000
Mary Anne Thygesen

* Driving The Future of Data Storage on Linux: Pain Points and New Hardware

In this session, I will brief the audience on the future of data storage in Linux -- what kinds of new hardware are on the horizon, the general direction of new filesystem and block device driver work, and new software to make it easier to recover lost data. Audience members are welcome to discuss these changes and to air their pain points with a Linux kernel developer.
Chemistry 2014-04-01 01:07:18 +0000
Darrick Wong

* Fix Code, Delete Docs

Educators, authors, and co-workers are constantly demanding more code comments and documentation, yet none of them ever update it. The comments lie, the documentation exists in three variants, and still nobody knows how to make the code do the right thing.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 08:03:19 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* Join a HOT Activation: How to Respond to a Disaster with the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team as a Digital Volunteer

Join a HOT Activation: Digital Volunteering for Disaster Response
Culture 2014-04-02 11:51:33 +0000
Kate Chapman

* Let us QMLify the code : Journey from SoK 2012 to GSoC 2013 to GCI 2013

QML (Qt Meta Language or Qt Modeling Language) is a JavaScript-based, declarative language for designing user interface–centric applications. QML elements can be augmented by standard JavaScript both inline and via included .js files. I will be presenting why QML is gaining popularity over the purely Qt codebase,what is QML, how to get involved with it, and its future in the open source world. A great advantage in porting the code to QML from Qt is that it reduces the code maintenance effort for the communities like KDE. The plasmoids written in QML will have considerably less code as QML allows the creation of fluid UIs in a powerful declarative way.
Hacks 2014-04-05 04:15:51 +0000
Heena Mahour

* Open Source is Driving Big Data Trends, But Where?

Big data may be a buzzword, but that buzzword is driving major open source development. This panel will discuss the trends pushing open source projects related to big data.
Business 2014-04-05 03:16:23 +0000
Thursday Bram, Portia Burton, Rachel Shadoan

* Open Source is Enabling us to Tell Better Stories

The conversation in today's media world is shifting away from "how much content can we publish, and how fast?" and toward "how can we provide in-depth engagement with single pieces of content." The emerging realm of digital storytelling means that "messages are not only heard and understood, but inspire, motivate and elicit action." Open source is adding fuel to this fire, and it is getting brighter.
Chemistry 2014-04-11 23:43:55 +0000
Karen Borchert, Chris Strahl

* Promises Kept: The New Javascript Design Pattern

Javascript Promises are a new design pattern in javascript that is easy to use and understand but also makes your code more powerful. Learn how to get started using this design pattern and how it will clean your code and make you seem smarter.
Cooking 2014-04-04 13:35:56 +0000
Stefan Hayden

* Rating, ranking, and voting, the other social-media communication method

A parallel universe exists alongside text-based social media. Product ratings and customer-feedback surveys and organizational elections provide another path through which people communicate. Yet when we look at product ratings and survey results and election outcomes, do they always provide meaningful information? No. What tricks can we use to "outvote" other voters? Most importantly, how should your website or app or organization do the counting behind rating and ranking and voting? Alas, innovative DIY approaches easily give disastrous results. Only open-source software can produce trustworthy results. And only an understanding of counting methods can empower us to produce meaningful results.
Chemistry 2014-03-29 19:02:05 +0000
Richard Fobes

* Reproducible Journalism for Firefox Phones

Reproducible research, data journalism, mobile first - what happens when you mash them all up and deliver them to a Firefox phone?
Cooking 2014-04-04 03:37:52 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* SQL and NoSQL Data Model Optimization in Write-Optimized Databases

Though SQL and NoSQL data models are usually very different, write-optimized databases offer some similar benefits for both. I'll describe some of the background and implementation of write-optimized data structures, and we'll discuss some strategies for choosing data models to get the best performance out of them.
Chemistry 2014-04-10 20:49:14 +0000
Leif Walsh

* Systems programming as a swiss army knife

Why understanding some systems programming basics will make you a better developer.
Cooking 2014-03-28 03:12:24 +0000
Julia Evans

* Teaching in your code with the Experience API

The Experience API (xAPI) is a new JSON-based open standard for building learning systems and activities. It replaces SCORM with an API built around Statements. Anyone can read and write an xAPI Statement- it's English! You'll learn how to make your apps part of the new learning environment using xAPI, and how to map legacy learning systems to xAPI using Statements and other xAPI concepts.
Cooking 2014-04-04 21:48:22 +0000
Michael Van Kleeck

* The Coder as Artist: Painting with Pixels and Numbers

Popular culture would have us believe that programming and art are polar opposites. In reality, code is just another medium with which we are creating art every day. Learn how embracing code as our art and artists as our community will help us create a more beautiful and accessible world.
Culture 2014-04-05 05:06:15 +0000
Shawna Scott

* The Ultimate Context Switch: Ways to hotwire your brain to learn new programming languages/concepts.

Learning a new programming language and its constructs and conventions is difficult, but we make it even more difficult for ourselves. I'll give some techniques which circumvent the problem of learning something new.
Cooking 2014-04-07 18:00:44 +0000
Gloria W

* When Harry Met Iannis - 2014

An exploration of music composed and synthesized by open source software. This piece has been through three incarnations - 2001 (Perl and Sfront), 2004 (Lisp and MIDI) and 2009 - back to Perl and Sfront (https://soundcloud.com/znmeb/sets/when-harry-met-iannis-2009). It's time to revisit 'When Harry Met Iannis' - better algorithms, more modern languages, and more complex instruments.
Cooking 2014-04-12 06:00:39 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* You can be a kernel hacker

Writing operating systems sounds like it's only for wizards, but it turns out that operating systems are written by humans like you and me. I'm going to tell you what a kernel is and why you should care. Then we'll talk about a few concrete ways to get started with kernel hacking, ranging from the super-easy to the terrifyingly difficult.
Chemistry 2014-03-06 17:42:15 +0000
Julia Evans