Catriona Buhayar's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Badging and Beyond: Rubrics and Building a Culture of Recognition as Community Building Strategies

What are the qualities you need more of in your open source community?
Culture
Larissa Shapiro

* On the Shoulders Of Giants - Emacs for the Curious

With the need for flexible editors to handle the variety of programming languages we face regularly, the Emacs community is experiencing another renaissance. Let's get you started with Emacs and I'll show you how to become proficient quickly.
Chemistry
Howard Abrams

* An Adventure in Data Modeling: The Entity-Attribute-Value Model

A case study on the trials of Emma's performance when implementing the Entity-Attribute-Value data model on their PostgreSQL database systems.
Chemistry
Mark Wong

* Confessions of a DBA: worst and best things I've done in production

In the past 15 years, I've done some pretty horrendous things around the M in LAMP. I will balance this with good things I've done too.
Cooking
Emily Slocombe

* Data Wrangling: Getting Started Working with Data for Visualizations

Good data visualization allows us to leverage the incredible pattern-recognition abilities of the human brain to answer questions we care about. But how do you make a good visualization? Here's a crash course.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan

* Data, Privacy, & Trust in Open Source: 10 Lessons from Wikipedia

Few people today are not concerned with the way data is used to enhance or subvert individual privacy. This is especially true on the Web, where open source technologies are behind much of what we interact with and use on a daily basis. As the most fundamental aspects of our lives become networked -- social relationships, work, finance, and even how we get our food -- how can we make sure that open source technologies foster a sense of trust with users, protect their privacy, and still give data scientists the tools they need to gain insight?
Culture
Steven Walling

* DIY User Research for Open Source Projects

Open source is only about open code, right? Wrong. Interviews, questionnaires, quick usability tests, and many other research types all have a place in the open source development process. With a few easy steps and a set of scripts to follow, your community can make user research an easy and essential component of your open source project.
Culture
Erin Richey

* Extension Development with Mediawiki

Mediawiki is one of the most commonly used "wiki's" across a plethora of sites. So I will help you build your own "Mediawiki Extension" that will help you to enhance the features of your wiki.
Hacks
Richa Jain

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Freedom, security and the cloud

Cloud hosting is cheap. Cloud hosting is easy. What compromises are you making when you deploy to the cloud, both in terms of your security and in terms of your dependency on proprietary software?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* Futel: the future of the past of telephony

Futel is more than a collection of payphones installed in publicly accessible locations. Find out what we hope to achieve by starting a free telephone network.
Hacks
Karl Anderson

* How to Run 100 User Tests in Two Days

Have you ever dreamed of running a vast quantity of user tests in a very short amount of time? Let me show you how I pulled this off at two conferences.
Hacks
Daniel Sauble

* Internet Archive: More than the Wayback Machine

In this session we will: * Give you a tour of Internet Archive and its collections * Introduce you to the APIs and tools you can use to access and contribute to the Archive * Show examples of how other people and institutions are using the Archive
Chemistry
VM Brasseur, Alexis Rossi

* Life-Hacking and Personal Time Management for the Rest of Us

Almost all the books and articles out there about taking Agile methods into your personal life seem geared to people who have control over their schedules. What about those of us who have childcare, eldercare, or other incompressible schedule demands?
Hacks
H. Waterhouse

* Lights, Art, Action! An exploration in technology, art, and making mistakes

Curious about integrating open source and art? We’ll explore a particular project in detail while providing both functionality and process recommendations. Both the art and the hardware will come to visit, along with the creators.
Cooking
Catriona Buhayar, Bill Madill

* Making Your Privacy Software Usable

Privacy enhancing technologies (PETs), like onion routing, PGP, and OTR often achieve a high level of security, but user experience (UX) built on top of the protocols is often a development afterthought. Without a concerted effort to examine how the system is used, people accidentally compromise their data or never attempt to use PETs. This talk will show you PET design done right and wrong through the lens of standard UX evaluation techniques. Our goal is to enable you to incorporate UX principles into your hacking from day 0.
Chemistry
Jen Davidson, Sean McGregor

* Modern Home Automation

There are a few different options available to you to control your home automation system. Many manufacturers make it convenient to use their system by not only making a convenient to install their products and use their interface, but will actually host all the software portions for you. Many provide apps for your IOS or Android device and have web interfaces for your laptop as well, making the control of these devices very streamlined and simple, especially if there are many devices to be managed. Other more DIY-approach solutions also have interfaces to control your automation, although require a bit more setup. For example, with the power strip in the previous example, you first need to connect it to your wireless network, and then you'll be able to use the supplied phone/tablet app to toggle the ports on/off. As with anything DIY: The sky's the limit, although it requires more technical understanding of what's going on.
Cooking
Ben Kero

* Mushroom Data Demystified

Mushroom Observer is a tool for logging and mapping fungus sightings. Beginners and professionals collaborate to produce a comprehensive data set, which has contributed to the burgeoning science of mycology. While this talk focuses on Mushroom Observer, it will be an overview of usefulness of open source amateur contributions to scientific research.
Culture
Lauren Hudgins

* OAuth, IndieAuth, and the Future of Authorization APIs

You use OAuth every time you log in to Facebook or Twitter, but what if you could use it from your own website? What if your own domain became a source of data, and you had your own personal API? By decentralizing authorization to your own domain instead of a silo, you control when, how, and to whom your data is shared.
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* Open Lighting Architecture: Blinky Lights!

Target audience will anyone with a interest into doing atypical stuff with SoC platforms including professional and hobbyist level implementations. Even if it's a simple XMAS light display, complex LED panel setup, or even driving consumer products like Hue lights.
Cooking
Matt Ranostay

* Open source software could save libraries! Maybe!

There are opportunities for open source to help save the day for libraries, ending many of librarians' and library users' woes.
Business
Coral Sheldon-Hess

* OpenStreetWhat? Mapping The World With Open Data

Come learn about OpenStreetMap, a Wikipedia-like project with over one million contributors aiming to map the entire world. We'll talk about the project, the data, and how to do some cool things with it.
Cooking
Justin Miller, Rafa Gutierrez

* Random

If you want to understand randomness better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Supporting communities with Gittip

There are lots of people doing good work in the world, and while there seems to be a myriad of ways to provide financial "donations", few of them provide a way to do so in a sustainable manner. We're going to look at Gittip, a freedom loving platform to provide a sustainable, predictable income to those making the world a better place.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* The 20,000km view: How GPS works

GPS is more than just letting your phone tell you where you are. I believe GPS is a contender for "most amazing piece of engineering in the history of humanity", and I'll show you why.
Chemistry
Jamey Sharp

* Trust, Community, and Automatic Updates

WordPress shipped in October what is perhaps its most polarizing feature ever — automatic updates in the background of self-hosted web software, on by default and no easy way to turn it off. In most open source communities, this would be cause for open revolt. Learn how through trust, communication, and a steadfast commitment to its philosophies, the WordPress core team convinced a skeptical community to go along, even if it meant users giving up some control.
Culture
Andrew Nacin