Niharika Kohli's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Matter of Time

Did you know that every so often, a minute lasts 61 seconds? If that sounds like something that might break some software, you'd be right! In this talk, we'll discuss the common ways that time is implemented in a number of libraries you probably depend on, how these representations can fall short of giving us a complete picture of what time it is, and what we can do about this state of affairs.
Chemistry
John Feminella

* A Pair Programming Workshop

Pair programming is a great way to collaborate on code and to share new ideas and techniques, but the social dynamics can be challenging. In this session, we'll talk about what works and what doesn't, and practice some techniques for better pairing!
Culture
Moss Collum, L Dean

* Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Pelican: A Comparison of Static Site Generators

Want to make a static site or blog, but not sure where to start? Tired of using Wordpress and looking for something better? This talk will get into the nitty-gritty details of how Jekyll and Pelican -- two popular static site generators -- work, and explain how to choose which is best for your project. Using examples you can clone from github, we'll cover the pros and cons of both SSGs, discuss things that neither does well, and give you a better idea of how to get your site up and running (with an open source tool!).
Chemistry
Lucy Wyman

* GeekChoir 2015

In this session, we'll continue the grand Open Source Bridge tradition of learning how to increase team cohesion, identity, and collaboration through music, joining our voices (in our uniquely geeky way) in harmony.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* How the Internet Works

The Internet runs the world; it connects our devices, powers our businesses, and even talks to our thermostats. But how does it all happen? We will follow an adventurous young web browser from the moment a hapless user presses "enter" and witness the trials and tribulations of many packets. Ride alongside the most fearsome syscalls as we learn how the Internet works!
Chemistry
Noah Kantrowitz

* How to Really Get Git

You already know how to use “git status”, “git push”, and “git add” for your personal projects. You know how to work on a team project with git version control. How do you achieve the next level of git mastery and fix mistakes? We’ll cover how to set up your git environment for a productive workflow, different ways to undo your mistakes in git, and finally, how to use the IPython notebook to automate an entire git workflow.
Hacks
Susan Tan

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Male/Female/Othered: Implementing Gender-Inclusiveness in User Data Collection

You want to gather information about your users that you can use to improve their experience and yours. They want their identities to be acknowledged and treated with respect. This talk is about meeting both needs: How to ask about gender in ways that welcome the diversity of reality while still being able to analyze the data you get back. We'll discuss the nature of that challenge, how some major websites address it, and example solutions for different scenarios.
Culture
Finn Ellis, Jonathan Harker

* Reinventing black boxes

Open source has a long history of reimplementing, and reverse engineering proprietary tools. This talk will integrate the tools needed to reverse engineer into stories of how it has been done before.
Hacks
Daniel Johnson

* So how do you reach every person on the planet: Internationalization at Twitter

Twitter is the world’s most popular platform which enables users to create and share ideas and information instantly, without barriers. In order to fulfill this mission, it has to provide language support for every person seamlessly. This talk will walk through Twitter’s open source language libraries, internationalization and localization standards and technologies.
Chemistry
Alolita Sharma

* Universal Web Design: How to create an awesome experience for *every* user

In this talk, I will describe how Universal Web Design principles can be easily applied to new or existing sites, how these principles will improve your users’ experience, and how Universal Web Design will save you time and money.
Culture
David Newton

* What is LocalWiki, and why is it so much fun? Let's edit it!

LocalWiki, a very friendly and inclusive cousin of Wikipedia, is a project hosting region-specific open-content wikis where a community can write about local topics in as much detail as they like. I've had a ton of fun with this recently, and I'd like to explain to you why you might like it too! We can work on some first edits together.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

Favorite proposals for this user

* 90 writing tips in 45 minutes

Almost every job involves a little writing, even if it's code comments or repair notes on a car. But what if you don't feel confident with writing? I have a rapid-fire presentation of writing tips and tricks that can help get you started, keep you going, and make your work better, even if you don't think you're a writer, I bet it will help!
Hacks 2015-01-20 02:50:35 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* An Introduction to Slim for PHP

Why is Slim cool? Because it gives you what you need to start an HTTP application, and then gets out of the way. It lets me use the components I want to use. It doesn't require any external dependencies. And it doesn't make me learn a whole bunch of framework-specific stuff that will be useless everywhere else. I like that. And I think you will too. This session will cover why you'd choose Slim, building a "hello world" app with just a few lines of code, how to integrate your favorite components, and scaling Slim up to the needs of larger apps.
Cooking 2015-01-16 14:52:46 +0000
Ed Finkler

* Automate Yo'self

One of the greatest productivity boosts you can have as a programmer is optimizing your working environment to more tightly integrate your tools and remove inefficiencies. Come learn a number of tips, tricks, and tools that can make your programming experience faster and better.
Cooking 2015-03-08 05:44:12 +0000
John Anderson

* Be Awesome To Each Other

Roundtable discussion to share tips and ideas that can be implemented for empowering everyone to (re-)build an inclusive, supportive tech culture.
Culture 2015-03-13 01:09:57 +0000
Cat Poole

* Dipping Your Toe in the Ruby Water: Using Ruby with Non-Ruby Projects

This session will introduce you to the Ruby programming language by comparing it to PHP, and show some creative ways to start integrating Ruby with your non-Ruby projects.
Chemistry 2015-02-09 20:51:26 +0000
Andrew Havens

* Hacking Natural Language with Python

One of the joys of the Python ecosystem is its rich variety of libraries for dealing with natural language. I've recently begun exploring these libraries, and I'll share some of what I learned.
Hacks 2015-03-08 03:40:40 +0000
Moss Collum

* How to be a maker ? - An introduction to Arduino and Raspberry Pi

The session will deal with basics of Arduino and Raspberry Pi and audience need not be a hardware geek.
Hacks 2015-03-13 09:16:47 +0000
Nidhiya V Raj

* Mastering Bootstrap: how to get the most out of Bootstrap by writing modular CSS themes

Take Bootstrap to the next level by learning how to setup a development environment with harp.js, setup a Less variable and mixin library, make your theme modular, and deploy your theme for use on your projects or for sale on a marketplace.
Cooking 2015-01-11 08:36:42 +0000
Matt Lambert

* Never do the same thing twice

Use tools like Chef, Ansible, Docker and Terraform to not do things over and over.
Chemistry 2015-03-14 21:43:09 +0000
Amy Pivo

* Sass: What It Is, How It's Used, and Why It's So Syntactically Awesome

This talk will start off with the basics of what Syntactically Awesome StyleSheets are, what features and functionality they have to offer, and why they're a great tool to have in your arsenal. We'll then delve into how to use Sass in developing your own sites and what tools you'll want to use alongside it, complete with a live demo and some in-production examples.
Cooking 2015-02-13 20:41:18 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* Software Development and Stretched Analogies

Our perspective matters. Using interesting framing (while also laughing at the absurdity of it) can help us become better developers.
Cooking 2015-03-08 04:33:50 +0000
Kyle Jones

* Speaking for Non-Speakers

Many conference attendees come year after year without giving presentations. The sense that there's a high bar for perfection is pervasive, and people are afraid of being "wrong." Everyone has a story to tell about a problem they've solved or issues they've tackled. Learn how to share your experiences without fear, and join the speaker community!
Culture 2015-02-10 00:58:26 +0000
Kirsten Hunter

* Stop Building Monoliths!

All I needed to do was validate a postcode, and validating non-US postcodes can be tricky, so I didn't want to write that code myself. So I went to Google and searched on "postcode validate javascript". The first link was to a library, and it did postcode validation! Then I read the documentation. Postcode validation was a method. Of a form object. Not a HTML form object, but the library's form object. I'd have to import the whole framework, and rewrite my application, just to validate postcodes. Hold on here: postcodes are strings first, and maybe form elements later. But wouldn't validating a postcode be a method on a string?
Chemistry 2015-03-14 23:09:47 +0000
Emma Humphries

* The End of JS Frameworks: ES6 and Web Components

JavaScript has a long history of being difficult to structure and maintain. To deal with this complexity a swath of frameworks have emerged over the years. At a glacial pace we have seen the web improve and those changes are ubiquitous now. ES6 and web components are happening! Come to this talk to learn how to get started with vanilla web platform code.
Hacks 2015-01-21 19:16:48 +0000
Brian LeRoux

* The Ethics Of Software Development

The software we build has an impact on millions of people, and while it can be empowering for many, it is often disempowering for many others. Many times we as developers don't really think through these issues, and that is really a shame because the work we do has enormous impact on people's lives, and that impact is very often in opposition to a lot of the values that we hold dear. This session will talk through some of these issues, and explain why it is so important that we think about how we affect the world, and try to frame our work in a way that meshes well with our own values.
Culture 2015-02-18 19:42:28 +0000
Greg Dunlap

* Three Bug Stories

Learn to write better code by hearing interesting ways that code has gone wrong!
Cooking 2015-03-08 03:29:05 +0000
Moss Collum

* Using WebRTC to enhance your product

Using WebRTC doesn't require that brand new idea or that awesome new app that's going to revolutionise communications. Using WebRTC can just mean enhancing your product with more features and therefore bringing more to your service. Learn what opportunities you're missing.
Chemistry 2015-03-14 22:39:14 +0000
Dan Jenkins

* Welcome to the (home office) jungle

Working remotely can be great. It can also be terrible. All that freedom! All that flexibility! None of that pesky human contact! Of course, it's not all sunshine and roses (particularly that last one), and I'll be talking about how to balance remote work to get the most out of it.
Business 2015-01-20 00:50:16 +0000
Adam Harvey

* Who wants to make video games?

"So how do you get that beautiful art style that you really want? Your game is done, maybe feature complete, but it's either got your crummy drawings or just grey rectangles dancing around. The music, the sound, the look of a game like 'Dungeon of the Endless' or 'Journey,' how do you get THAT? I have good news for you: there are more artists than there are coders, and more musicians than there are human beings on earth. Yes you'll have to pay them, yes you'll have to handle some conversations about expectations, and I'll cover that shortly, but really it will amaze you how easy it is to find truly beautiful resources to populate your game"
Business 2015-03-13 21:11:48 +0000
Toby Fee

* Writing debuggable code

Let's talk about the Do's and Don'ts that make code easier to debug (because let's face it, we will all write bugs at some point in our coding careers).
Cooking 2015-03-08 04:31:29 +0000
Jonathan Harker

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* Performance strategies for delivering web fonts at Wikipedia scale

Wikipedia supports almost 300 languages for its multilingual content communities. As mixed script web pages become pervasive and non-Latin language content grows exponentially, a breakthrough technology of delivering webfonts on demand has been deployed across 900 Wikimedia sites. This talk discusses user benefits derived from this technological advance as well some of the performance and scalability improvements made to deliver fonts at Wikipedia scale.
Chemistry
Alolita Sharma

* A Few Python Tips

Nothing fancy here, just several tips that help you work effectively with Python. This talk is licensed CC BY; please feel free to reuse it at your company or conference.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara

* Advanced Javascript Basics for Web Developers

Javascript is a necessity for modern web development. Whether it is to add more interactivity to your user interface, or provide a client to interact with your API, chances are, even if you're trying to avoid working in javascript, you're working in javascript. Projects like Coffeescript and Opal, while useful, still do not help understand the javascript outputted by these compile-able languages. One growing concern in this realm is that an application's javascript can sometimes be a security concern, easily exploited by a malicious user. In order to catch these concerns, you must know what your javascript does, inside and out. This talk will illustrate concepts to make sure your client code is secure, while still giving your team the flexibility it needs to keep building your stellar app!
Chemistry
Lauren Voswinkel

* Beyond Leaning In: How to Negotiate to Get What You Want

Now that you know how important it is to ask for want you want, come learn how to negotiate in a way that will get you what you need. For everyone of any gender identity who works at a company or freelances, who feels like a newb or an expert, this presentation will teach you effective, practical skills to improve your negotiations and deal confidently with conflicts.
Business
Katie Lane

* Build your own exobrain

Online services like "If This Then That" (IFTTT) are great for automating your life. However they provide limited ways for the end-user to add their own services, and often require credentials that one may normally wish to keep secret. The 'exobrain' project allows for service integration and extension on a machine *you* control.
Cooking
Paul Fenwick

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor

* Don't Let Your Tests Flake Out

The build's red with a test failure. You re-run the tests and suddenly all is well. What's going on?
Cooking
Jason Clark

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk

* Extension Development with Mediawiki

Mediawiki is one of the most commonly used "wiki's" across a plethora of sites. So I will help you build your own "Mediawiki Extension" that will help you to enhance the features of your wiki.
Hacks
Richa Jain

* Geek Choir

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Introduction to Sphinx & Read the Docs

Learn more about how to document your software projects with the most powerful open source documentation tool. You'll learn more about how to think about semantics in documentation, and how to use these tools to make great looking documentation.
Chemistry
Eric Holscher

* IPv6 for Programmers

IPv4 is running out of addresses. IPv6 is the Internet Protocol which gives plenty of addresses for the future. It is starting to be deployed widely and open source applications and programming languages need to support it.
Chemistry
Ian Burrell

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Knitting for programmers

Yeah, you've seen us knitting during talks. I promise we're paying more attention than the people with their laptops open. Well, now learn how we do what we do... the programmer way. I'll start with the topology of individual stitches and go through geometry to design patterns, and by the end of it you'll know how to knit a sweater.
Hacks
Alex Bayley

* Life-Hacking and Personal Time Management for the Rest of Us

Almost all the books and articles out there about taking Agile methods into your personal life seem geared to people who have control over their schedules. What about those of us who have childcare, eldercare, or other incompressible schedule demands?
Hacks
H. Waterhouse

* Lightning Talk Workshop

Heard of lightning talks but never considered giving one? Never fear, lightning talks are easy! During this session, you'll write and practice your first lightning talk.
Cooking
Michelle Rowley

* Lights, Art, Action! An exploration in technology, art, and making mistakes

Curious about integrating open source and art? We’ll explore a particular project in detail while providing both functionality and process recommendations. Both the art and the hardware will come to visit, along with the creators.
Cooking
Catriona Buhayar, Bill Madill

* Making language selection smarter in Wikipedia

It’s time to make Wikipedia language selection smarter -- to offer a user languages he/she actually wants to see in an article, and in an efficient way. In this talk we shall learn about : 1.The need for a compact language selector 2.How we achieved it in an Outreach Program for Women project. 3.What criteria we use to determine which languages might be most useful to a user, and why 4.How we implemented the feature 5.What concerns we heard from the Wikimedia community about this project 6.How everyone can help pitch in to make this project a success
Chemistry
Niharika Kohli, Sucheta Ghoshal

* Power Tuning Linux: A Case Study

In this talk we will do a reality-check in terms of the power consumption on off-the-shelve systems running “out of the box” Linux distributions.
Chemistry
Alexandra Yates

* Random

If you want to understand randomness better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Tales from the Trenches: Battling Browser Bugs for "Fun" and (Non-)Profit

Web development used to be HARD. You basically had to rewrite your code for every new browser you wanted to support. But with modern browsers and libraries like jQuery, those dark days are over. Or are they? We pushed the limits of what the web can do while building VisualEditor (the new editor for Wikipedia) and found plenty of hilarious, insane, amazing and horrifying bugs in browsers even in 2014. All we needed to do was poke around in some unusual places.
Hacks
Roan Kattouw

* The 20,000km view: How GPS works

GPS is more than just letting your phone tell you where you are. I believe GPS is a contender for "most amazing piece of engineering in the history of humanity", and I'll show you why.
Chemistry
Jamey Sharp

* The Keys to Working Remotely

When I tell people I work from home, they tend to assume I spend the day playing with my dog outside. It's beyond comprehension to most that I actually spend as much time working as they do, sometimes more. I hope to enlighten those close-minded people about the possibilities working from home offers and how to do it well. Session slides: http://www.carsonshold.com/talks/keys-to-working-remotely/
Culture
Carson Shold

* The Outreach Program for Women: what works & what's next

We've mentored and interned in the Outreach Program for Women, and we know it works -- it improves the gender balance inside open source communities. We'll discuss why it works, how it builds off of Google Summer of Code, and discuss replicating it, expanding it, and looking at the next step in the recruiting and inclusion pipeline.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Liz Henry

* Unicorns Are People, Too: Re-Thinking Soft and Hard Skills

As developers, we tend to value hard skills that can be quantified or measured objectively. Job postings search for unicorns, but we are people first and foremost and being human isn't as easy as programming. While the code comes easily, the soft skills that make us human are complicated and difficult to get right. This talk will explore the danger of neglecting so-called "soft" skills, what we stand to lose by overvaluing technical skills, and alternatives to the hard and soft dichotomy.
Culture
Liz Abinante

* UX Design in Action: Redesigning the Mailman UI

One of the upcoming features in the Mailman 3 project is a front-end redesign of the mail archiver web interface. Learn more about the new interface, its progress so far, and the designing challenges of building a mobile-first responsive web site. The talk will also illustrate our design process and provide you with design methods and evaluation techniques that you can take back to your own project.
Chemistry
Karen Tang

Favorite proposals for this user

* What Are Computers, Really?

We'll take a whirlwind tour of the theory behind what computers do. We'll start with counting on our fingers and end with an explanation of why there are some problems where the laws of physics say "no, a computer can never do this". No mathematical background necessary.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 00:45:10 +0000
Clarissa Littler