Kronda Adair's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* Build your own spamtrap: How to make a spam IP blacklist in 45 minutes

I show how to use Postfix, PowerDNS, Spamassassin, and Python/Flask to trap spam sent to your whole organization (and why you would want such a thing).
Hacks
Andy Schmitt

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp

* Creating a Third Wave of Free/Open Source Software

The free/open source software movement is over thirty years old, and has gone through a number of changes in that time, spawning projects large and small (including OpenConferenceWare, which runs this site!). If Free Software is the first generation, and Open Source is the second, current efforts toward creating an inclusive and sustainable world make up a third generation that we can start to form into a broader plan.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Deployment as a Feature

Too often the deployment of software is treated as a necessary evil. When you design your deployments as a feature of your system, the productivity gains will surprise you.
Theory
Carl Hall

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* How NOT to run your organization into the ground: lessons from Wikimedia Philippines for open source

Running a tech non-profit, especially in open source, is a lot of work. So much work, in fact, that in my six years as part of Wikimedia Philippines, I will admit to one of my biggest secrets: I have run my organization into the ground. Luckily for us, however, we've been really fortunate to be able to rebuild the organization from the ground up. Here's some of the lessons we've learned over the course of that process, and how you can avoid making the mistakes we made as you either form or build your own organization.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Librarians and Open Source: We Need Code, Too!

Getting people started is easy. Sustaining people through is not. Let's talk about the ways the Open Source community can help people beyond the beginning steps, in the context of public library programming and staff development.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Open Source is People

For those who want to do more than just code, this talk will show you 8 ways I have contributed without opening up Vim once.
Culture
Justin Dorfman

* Sustainable Career Development: Advancing While Still Having Free Time

In this talk, we'll examine the pressure in the tech industry to participate in work-related extracurriculars like side projects and meetups. We'll analyze where these expectations come from, what they're actually getting at, and talk about ideas for progressing in our careers without losing sight of the things in life that make us happy outside of work.
Culture
Noelle Daley

* Taking no for an answer

Open source (like many fields) rewards people who are confident and even a bit pushy. So we give talks encouraging folk to get over imposter syndrome, lean in, say yes to more things. But self-improvement shouldn't focus only on our most vulnerable members, but also our most powerful. So let's talk not about saying yes, but about hearing no. Learning to take no for an answer can transform efforts such as security, diversity and mentoring where we have few experts or volunteers and great need. Let's talk about accepting "defeat" with grace, and how to take "no" for an answer while still moving forwards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* The Ability to Disable: Who Did You Forget When You Designed Your UI?

While the increased use of technology has in some ways improved the lives of those with disabilities, there is a gap that still needs to be filled. Uncaptioned or poorly captioned videos leave the deaf and hard of hearing community out of the loop, untagged photos leave blind users unaware of integral information, and poorly coded webpages are too much of a hassle for individuals using screen readers. But what if this was this was different? What if we thought about all of the potential users of our technology and developed programs intentionally allowing access for everyone? How could we make a programmer’s work truly inclusive, truly open to everyone? Experiential learning often provides those ‘a ha!’ moments, so together we’ll enjoy some mis-captioned videos, have a ‘listen-along’ to what a screen reader sounds like when a page is not coded correctly, and take a look at the end users’ experience when software is not programmed with a disabled audience in mind. Then, we’ll talk about what we can do to improve the current offerings and answer, “what next?”
Culture
Rebecca Jennings

* Why you can't afford to miss out on junior developers

What if your next hire could make your team faster, help create a more inclusive and diverse environment, be easy to find, and be super excited to work with you? These people are not unicorns, they're junior developers. Most teams just don't know how to bring them on and get these benefits. Whether you're in a startup, consultancy, or a BigCo, with a few tips and processes, any team can learn how to grow new developers.
Practice
Bracken Mosbacker

Favorite proposals for this user

* Technical writing as public service: working on open source in government

What if U.S. federal agencies decided to reuse and contribute to open source software projects built by other agencies, since agencies often have similar technology problems to solve? And what if they hired technical writers with open source community experience to write documentation for these projects? That would be pretty cool. Also, that’s my work. I'm part of 18F, a digital services consulting team within and for the federal government, and all of our work is open source.
Practice 2016-04-06 00:21:15 +0000
Britta Gustafson

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Catalyzing Diversity: Practical Advice for Navigating Minority STEM Communities to Open Up Open Source

How can Open Source Software projects attract minorities? Come to learn practical strategies to implement your diversity goals into actionable outreach efforts. We will describe ways to tap into minority STEM communities that exist both online and in meatspace. The former include Tweet chats and hashtags used by people of color who are enthusiasts of science (like #BLACKandSTEM) and tech (like #LATISM). The live events include annual conferences of minority students and professionals such as the Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing.
Culture
Alberto Roca, Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Dog Food is for Dogs: Escape the Crate of Your Perspective with User Research

Dogfooding—using your own products—is nice, but is it sufficient to produce good design for people who aren’t you? Our familiarity with our projects and their quirks makes us poor substitutes for users in the wild. So just who are these users, and how do you incorporate them into design and development? In this workshop, we'll explore user experience design and research strategies that will help you design for people who aren’t you.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan, amelia abreu

* For Love and For Money

Let’s talk about the work we want to do, the work we have to do, and how we might create systems that don’t continue to force bad choices between building community, technical work, and diversity activism.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal and social identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* How you tell the story matters: telling better stories and making better technologies

What happens when we tell stories? How do we tell stories about the technology we build, why do some stories get told over others? How do we talk about our successes, and how do we not talk about our failures? Whose stories get heard: how do women, people of color, disabled people, and “non-technical” workers get left out of the stories we hear? In this talk, I'll explore the role of storytelling in technology, and share what I've found about telling better stories.
Business
amelia abreu

* Removing Barriers: Ascend Project Post Mortem

Last year the Ascend Project was announced, then in the fall the first pilot took place in Portland. This year we'll report back on how it went, hear from participants, and break down what worked and what could be changed for future versions of this type of program. You'll definitely come away with some ideas for your next learning event, code school, or sponsored training.
Hacks
Lukas Blakk, Kronda Adair

* User Research For Non-Researchers

User research doesn't have to be time-consuming, elaborate, or performed by a UX professional. If you're willing to talk to a few strangers, you can do user research. In this presentation, I'll talk about how to do lightweight research on any product or topic, no matter what your background and training are. I'll focus on the most effective tools for quick research, and some of the common pitfalls for novice researchers.
Cooking
Jane Davis

* What stuttering taught me about marketing - not your typical soft skills talk

Your weakness just might be your greatest strength.
Culture
Sharon Steed

* Your Job is Political: Tech Money in Politics

As much as the personal is political, the old-fashioned political still is too, and companies and individuals made rich by the tech industry and by open source software have been making increasingly direct monetary incursions into U.S. politics. Let's take a look at what policies & politicians our bosses, investors, users and contributors are buying at the local and state levels, with a specific focus on current changes in education policy and future moves in law enforcement.
Business
Kelsey Gilmore-Innis

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* Badging and Beyond: Rubrics and Building a Culture of Recognition as Community Building Strategies

What are the qualities you need more of in your open source community?
Culture
Larissa Shapiro

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Advanced Javascript Basics for Web Developers

Javascript is a necessity for modern web development. Whether it is to add more interactivity to your user interface, or provide a client to interact with your API, chances are, even if you're trying to avoid working in javascript, you're working in javascript. Projects like Coffeescript and Opal, while useful, still do not help understand the javascript outputted by these compile-able languages. One growing concern in this realm is that an application's javascript can sometimes be a security concern, easily exploited by a malicious user. In order to catch these concerns, you must know what your javascript does, inside and out. This talk will illustrate concepts to make sure your client code is secure, while still giving your team the flexibility it needs to keep building your stellar app!
Chemistry
Lauren Voswinkel

* Beyond Leaning In: How to Negotiate to Get What You Want

Now that you know how important it is to ask for want you want, come learn how to negotiate in a way that will get you what you need. For everyone of any gender identity who works at a company or freelances, who feels like a newb or an expert, this presentation will teach you effective, practical skills to improve your negotiations and deal confidently with conflicts.
Business
Katie Lane

* Distributed Agile Development or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Remoties

This is the story of how the mobile web engineering team at the Wikimedia Foundation became an extremely high-functioning and successful agile team: by embracing - rather than shying away from - a distributed model. This talk will explore the agile team's journey and how we cope with the inherent tension of remoteness and the agile principle, 'The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation'.
Culture
Arthur Richards

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Geek Choir

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hold on to Your Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* How to Run 100 User Tests in Two Days

Have you ever dreamed of running a vast quantity of user tests in a very short amount of time? Let me show you how I pulled this off at two conferences.
Hacks
Daniel Sauble

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Keeping your culture afloat through a tidal wave of interest ~~\o/~~

During the height of interest to the project, there were often several new people arriving in the channel per day. That may not sound like a lot, but everyone had questions and would be interested in different things; it could take a twenty minute conversation or so with someone who knew a lot about the project in order to properly greet, inform, and orient new people. The founders didn't have a few spare hours around the clock to personally devote to making sure that each new arrival was welcomed, felt welcomed, had their questions answered, and had their willingness to contribute channeled into something which needed the help and suited their skills. There was a lot about this that we could have automated or dumped into a higher-latency format like email. The first time someone proposed automating the welcoming dance it was like they'd slapped me in the face. The personal touch bit was crucial, and automating it would have struck all the wrong notes. The project was supposed to be for people, by people, and showing that we're human and we're committed to keeping it small and personal was crucial to keeping the culture intact.
Culture
Azure Lunatic, Kat Toomajian

* Life-Hacking and Personal Time Management for the Rest of Us

Almost all the books and articles out there about taking Agile methods into your personal life seem geared to people who have control over their schedules. What about those of us who have childcare, eldercare, or other incompressible schedule demands?
Hacks
H. Waterhouse

* Modernizing a Stagnant Toolbox

WordPress turned 10 years old in May of 2013. On that day, the main repo didn't contain a single tool to make it easier for developers to work with and contribute code. Over the last year, this is how and why we changed all that.
Hacks
Aaron Jorbin

* NerdCred++; How to Customize your Bash Prompt

The terminal is a powerful tool on any developer’s belt. The command line interface provides extensive functionality via simple entry of commands. In this workshop we will customize the development experience by adding personal ⭐︎flair⭐︎ and making the most of limited screen real estate. Customizing the prompt provides additional information and functionality with the bonus of flair. Participants will be able to take pride in custom craftsmanship with the result.
Hacks
Pamela Ocampo, Rachel Walker

* REI's Expedition into Open Source

The software engineers at REI build, maintain, and operate the cooperative’s digital retail infrastructure, from our mobile apps to REI.com, and it runs on open source. We see many benefits to open sourcing our code, but it’s uncharted territory for REI. This is our journey preparing the cooperative to contribute our code back to the open source community. Will we be successful? What have we learned? You’ll find out!
Business
Rob McGuire-Dale

* Rocket Science On Github

Git isn't just for code. What about CAD files? Experimental test data? How do you manage a multidisciplinary project with git? Last year Portland State Aerospace Society, a relatively large open source rocketry project, moved all their work onto github. I'll share my experience with the switch from a few self hosted git repos to a full fledged github presence. What worked, what hasn't, github's features for non coders, and a little on the future of open science.
Culture
Nathan Bergey

* Speaker Support of Awesomeness: How I went from stage fright to stage presence and want to help others do the same.

Once upon a time, I was terrified of public speaking. I went from having stage fright to being a stage presence who speaks at conferences. I run a support group for old and new speakers called the "Tech Conf Speaker Support of Awesomeness." I want to talk about what we do, why we do it, and how well it's worked out so far. This talk is about speaking for the first time, improving your talks, and how conference organizers and attendees can help too.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* SQL Utility Belt

SQL is an incredibly powerful language, but it can be difficult sometimes to advance beyond the basics. In this session, we will go over several tricks and tips to expand your SQL tool kit.
Cooking
Michael Alan Brewer

* Supporting communities with Gittip

There are lots of people doing good work in the world, and while there seems to be a myriad of ways to provide financial "donations", few of them provide a way to do so in a sustainable manner. We're going to look at Gittip, a freedom loving platform to provide a sustainable, predictable income to those making the world a better place.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Surviving Support: 10 Tips for Saving Your Users and Yourself

When I open sourced my plugin to the WordPress community, user support was one of the last things on my mind - I was more excited to have written awesome code and a helpful site extension. Shortly thereafter though, customer support was the only thing I had time for. When your user base ranges in skill level from experienced developer to your grandmother, well… you've gotta be prepared for just about anything. This session will highlight the challenges and benefits of stellar support and offer a few tricks to make the process as painless as possible for both your user and yourself.
Culture
Julie Cameron

* The Case for Junior Developers

Are you passionate about building tech, but think there is no place in your organization for junior developers? Come explore the true costs and benefits of hiring junior developers and see how you can improve your company while helping juniors become the best developers they can be.
Culture
Shawna Scott

* The Keys to Working Remotely

When I tell people I work from home, they tend to assume I spend the day playing with my dog outside. It's beyond comprehension to most that I actually spend as much time working as they do, sometimes more. I hope to enlighten those close-minded people about the possibilities working from home offers and how to do it well. Session slides: http://www.carsonshold.com/talks/keys-to-working-remotely/
Culture
Carson Shold

* The Outreach Program for Women: what works & what's next

We've mentored and interned in the Outreach Program for Women, and we know it works -- it improves the gender balance inside open source communities. We'll discuss why it works, how it builds off of Google Summer of Code, and discuss replicating it, expanding it, and looking at the next step in the recruiting and inclusion pipeline.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Liz Henry

* Trust, Community, and Automatic Updates

WordPress shipped in October what is perhaps its most polarizing feature ever — automatic updates in the background of self-hosted web software, on by default and no easy way to turn it off. In most open source communities, this would be cause for open revolt. Learn how through trust, communication, and a steadfast commitment to its philosophies, the WordPress core team convinced a skeptical community to go along, even if it meant users giving up some control.
Culture
Andrew Nacin

* Unicorns Are People, Too: Re-Thinking Soft and Hard Skills

As developers, we tend to value hard skills that can be quantified or measured objectively. Job postings search for unicorns, but we are people first and foremost and being human isn't as easy as programming. While the code comes easily, the soft skills that make us human are complicated and difficult to get right. This talk will explore the danger of neglecting so-called "soft" skills, what we stand to lose by overvaluing technical skills, and alternatives to the hard and soft dichotomy.
Culture
Liz Abinante

* Write an Excellent Programming Blog

As a member of the open source community, do you contribute only code, or also words? Writing about programming benefits yourself and others. This talk outlines solid article structures, suggests topics to write about, explains how blogging about programming is special, and inspires you to write articles of enduring value.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

Open Source Bridge 2013 Birds of a Feather

Favorite proposals for this user

* DevOps BOF (Confirmed)

The Portland DevOps group, PDXDevOps, would like to hold a BoF at OSB in place of its regularly scheduled meeting.
BOF 2013-06-11 22:39:41 +0000
Spencer Krum

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* !done - Hacking IRC Bots for Distributed Teams

When our company was acquired we needed a way to see everything that was done each day all in one place. Teams were using different methods to do this: standups, written reports, emails and meetings. Nothing stuck. Done reports introduces a simple IRC command: !done. Team members say !done and what they just did. These !dones are put into a daily report. !done becomes a part of everyday at work, not a strained task that’s easily forgotten.
Culture
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* Clone A Git Together Into Your Town

Git is used everywhere, but few structured communities or groups exist. Learn about the PDX Git Together and how to clone this community model into your town.
Culture
Duke Leto

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* Expanding Your Empathy

I believe empathy is the core competency that is missing from much of the efforts to push the tech community in a direction towards more diversity of all kinds. Companies, communities and conferences cannot expect everything to magically change until they're willing to go deep and examine the systemic patterns and structures that keep underrepresented communities from feeling safe and welcome in the tech space.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Keynote — Alex “Skud” Bayley

Keynote by Alex “Skud” Bayley
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Library of the future: building the Multnomah County Library website

The Multnomah County Library website has combined Drupal, Solr Search, Nginx, Varnish and a host of other technologies to build a highly scalable web infrastructure. The site takes advantage of responsive design techniques to provide patrons—the people who check out the books—with an impressive mobile experience.
Cooking
Joshua Mitchell

* More Code, More Problems

Some people will tell you that you need a large, full-stack framework to do web development The Right Way. These people are wrong.
Cooking
Edward Finkler

* Morning Keynote: James Vasile

Open source!
Culture
James Vasile

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* PHP for Pirates: pillaging interactive debugging from Ruby and JavaScript.

It's sad that in 2013, var_dump and die are still two of the most common debugging and reflection techniques in PHP. Let's explore the state of interactive debugging in PHP, compare it with what's available in other languages, and apply this with practical tools and techniques which can be used today.
Cooking
Justin Hileman

* Pro Bash Development; Way Beyond Shell Scripting

All Unix/Linux users know a little shell scripting, even if they're unaware of it. Pipes, for example, are a part of the Bash/sh language. Bash/sh, i.e. shell scripting, is usually treated as just that: shell scripting. But if you're crazy enough, you can develop full-blown profession, modular, and tested (yes, tested!) programs in Bash. It takes a little finesse, but I'll show you how, and you just might think twice about using Bash--really using it--in the future.
Hacks
Daniel Nichter

* Programming Is Debugging, So Debug Better

Debugging: The schedule destroyer, the confidence sapper, the mire in which thousands of working hours are lost every day. It's time to stop staring at those four lines of code, desperately willing the bug to appear. This session is about the philosophies that will steer you around bugs, strategies for dealing with them, and tools that can shorten a four-hour debugging session to five minutes.
Cooking
Yoz Grahame

* Quick Cure for the Shame of Untested Software

As the founder of a company focused on software testing, I speak often to developers who admit in private: "Yes, testing is important... but we don't test." Reasons vary, but the basic problem is that testing is seen as too difficult and time-consuming with no apparent value for the effort. In this talk I hope to convince you that this problem is a false dilemma and show you how to get started testing software quickly and easily.
Cooking
Daniel Nichter

* Remote Pair Programming

Remote Pair Programming: my setup, some advice, and a live demo^H^H stress test
Cooking
Sam Livingston-Gray

* Simple Questions Should Have Simple Answers

What happens when a project begins to embrace the philosophy that simple questions should have simple answers? Q: Simple to whom? A: Simple to the person asking the question. "Simple questions should have simple answers" has given me a lot of design clarity in my projects. I hope to convince you of its beneficial effects.
Culture
Michael Schwern

* Smart Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Test Driven Development with AngularJS

Learn how to practice test driven development in JavaScript using AngularJS
Cooking
Joe Eames

* Training the trainers

This long session is a tutorial, with exercises, on how to run welcoming, effective outreach events targeted at bringing newcomers into your communities.
Cooking
Asheesh Laroia