Jenner Hanni's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* Bringing Security to Your Open Source Project

With high profile breaches in open source projects, the issue of security has become one of great import to many people. But many projects, especially smaller ones, are intimidated by the idea of a security audit. This talk will discuss ways for smaller projects to experiment, learn, and even have fun improving their security. No PhDs in security required!
Culture
Terri Oda

* Failing With Grace

One of the biggest challenges of building distributed systems is dealing with failure. In this talk we'll explore how distributed systems fail and then once we're good and scared, we'll cover a number of approaches and tools to help you deal with failure.
Cooking
Sean O'Connor

* How the Internet Works

The Internet runs the world; it connects our devices, powers our businesses, and even talks to our thermostats. But how does it all happen? We will follow an adventurous young web browser from the moment a hapless user presses "enter" and witness the trials and tribulations of many packets. Ride alongside the most fearsome syscalls as we learn how the Internet works!
Chemistry
Noah Kantrowitz

* How to Really Get Git

You already know how to use “git status”, “git push”, and “git add” for your personal projects. You know how to work on a team project with git version control. How do you achieve the next level of git mastery and fix mistakes? We’ll cover how to set up your git environment for a productive workflow, different ways to undo your mistakes in git, and finally, how to use the IPython notebook to automate an entire git workflow.
Hacks
Susan Tan

* How to Teach Git

Version control is a necessary piece of the open source community and git has an unfortunately steep learning curve. Here is what I have learned from teaching git to beginners, so you don’t have to make the same mistakes.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Internet of Things Militia: Paramilitary Training for your IoT devices

Security folk generally talk about how the Internet of Things is bad for security, but it also brings new sensors and connected devices that could co-operate in new and interesting ways. Could we use internet things to enhance security?
Hacks
Terri Oda

* Introduction to data munging with pandas and IPython Notebook

This talk will go over importing, exploring, and exporting your data, and common issues you may encounter.
Cooking
Meli Lewis

* Open source collaboration for tackling real world environmental problems

Public Lab is a two-part project -- an attempt at large-scale community environmental monitoring, AND a massively distributed R&D lab for inventing new monitoring techniques and equipment. The community has grown a lot over the past five years, and we are here to share stories of -- and welcome you to -- an emerging FOSS culture that spans hardware, software, data, community organizing, and advocacy.
Culture
Dana Bauer, Mathew Lippincott

* Open Source Tools for Scientific Research

Come learn about open science and the tools available for modern scientific research.
Chemistry
Amy Boyle

* Open Source Tools of the Hardware Hacking Trade

Many embedded systems contain design flaws that could lead to exploitable vulnerabilities. In order to discover such flaws, hackers and engineers use a specific set of tools. In this session, Joe will discuss his favorite open source hardware hacking and reverse engineering tools, including those that monitor/decode digital communications, extract firmware, inject/spoof data, and identify/connect to debug interfaces.
Cooking
Joe Grand

* Open Source your Circuit Design with KiCAD

I learned to design circuits in Eagle because at the time there were no good, free, open source alternatives but I would argue that's changed. Let's talk about why KiCAD might be the CAD program you're looking for and do a whirlwind tour of the current state of KiCAD tools and community.
Chemistry
Jenner Hanni

* Probably

If you want to understand probability better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Reinventing black boxes

Open source has a long history of reimplementing, and reverse engineering proprietary tools. This talk will integrate the tools needed to reverse engineer into stories of how it has been done before.
Hacks
Daniel Johnson

* Testing the Multiverse

It’s a basic principle of testing that minimizing dependencies will make you happier, faster, and more productive. But what happens when you can’t?
Cooking
Jason Clark

* The Open Source Writing Stack

Open source makes writing and publishing much easier both online and in print — provided you know what tools to use. This talk covers those tools (from LaTeX to WordPress) and how to choose between them.
Hacks
Thursday Bram

* Troubleshooting In Distributed Systems

The shift to microservice and distributed architectures has made software products more flexible and scalable-- and a lot more complex. With so many moving parts, ephemeral conditions and the spectre of partial failure, it can be much more difficult to pinpoint how and why things break. Learn how Logstash, Elasticsearch and Kibana can be used to monitor healthy systems and investigate issues as they pop up, and what we can do outside of software to improve our process of problem-solving.
Chemistry
Megan Baker

* Trustworthy software in the real world

Software is made of bugs, yet software is controlling a growing part of our physical world. As bugs and security holes become potentially life-threatening, what can we do to make our software worthy of the trust we're placing in it? Take quadcopters, for example. Toy vehicles are not just in specialty hobby shops but even in supermarkets; sports stadiums and the White House are trying to find ways to keep them out; and everyone from agriculture startups to Amazon wants to use them commercially. Quadcopters are becoming safety and security critical systems, but how are we going to make them truly safe and secure? I'll present SMACCMPilot, a BSD-licensed high-assurance quadcopter autopilot, and the new tools and technologies that make it feasible to trust a large piece of software.
Hacks
Jamey Sharp

* Using Asterisk to Stop Robocallers

Robocallers are very annoying. Even when the Do Not Call list works, it doesn't cover all robo callers. This talk is about combining Asterisk (an open source PBX) running on a BeagleBone and some inexpensive hardware to really stop these annoying callers.
Cooking
Michael Pigg

Favorite proposals for this user

* 7 years of collaborative calendaring: Exploring Calagator

Seven years in, the Portland tech community's open source calendar aggregator, Calagator, has survived ups and downs, seen the outcome of those Ruby and Rails dogma shifts, and fundamentally changed the way people in Portland tech build community. In this combination talk and installfest, we'll explore the origins, history, impact, and future of Calagator, and how you can use Calagator to improve your local communities and increase engagement. Bring your laptops and your Ruby dev environments, and we'll walk through a fresh install!
Chemistry 2015-03-15 01:02:30 +0000
Shawna Scott

* Alchemy and the Art of Software Development

The metaphors we choose impose constraints on our thinking. We’ve chosen a limited set of fields to define our mental constraints. But almost any domain of human knowledge contains a rich vocabulary of patterns, metaphors, and tenets that can inform our problem-solving capabilities...
Culture 2015-03-07 21:38:40 +0000
Coraline Ada Ehmke

* Alice and Bob Are Really Confused

Journalists, activists, artists, business owners and other fine folks in New York City are asked to install PGP. You won't believe what happens next.
Culture 2015-03-15 00:29:32 +0000
David Huerta

* Automate Yo'self

One of the greatest productivity boosts you can have as a programmer is optimizing your working environment to more tightly integrate your tools and remove inefficiencies. Come learn a number of tips, tricks, and tools that can make your programming experience faster and better.
Cooking 2015-03-08 05:44:12 +0000
John Anderson

* Be careful what you wish for: a successful developer community discouraged away from open source

Let's say you want your freedom-valuing software community to be wildly successful - with lots of user demand, a viable way that people can make money from their work if they want to, a heavily international audience, and lots of young people interested. What happens if you get what you want? I'll explain cultural context from the iOS jailbreaking community that can serve as some interesting early warning signs of problems that could happen in open source.
Business 2015-03-08 08:34:33 +0000
Britta Gustafson

* Becoming a Rocket Scientist With Open Source

The new space industry is expanding rapidly, with huge opportunities for open-source contributions. This talk focuses on the case study of Asterank, software that makes space data easier to access and explore. Its analysis and visualization tools have been used in government, private industry, and schools. The project has made public space data more open and usable for millions of people.
Hacks 2015-02-03 01:41:56 +0000
Ian Webster

* BKO is dead long live bootboot!

Ever thought about network booting? What about booting a computer over the internet? What about booting a computer, over the internet, from a server that's on another continent? It's doable, and potentially easier than you would have expected
Hacks 2015-03-08 06:59:12 +0000
John Hawley

* Bringing Open Source to the Federal Government

The story of how one federal agency decided to start living open source principles, built great tools, and attracted great developer talent.
Culture 2015-02-06 17:08:49 +0000
Bruce Arthur

* Build your own Ruby-powered Arcade Machine!

This session will cover the basics of game programming using Ruby, as well as the hardware you need in order to build and run your own Ruby-powered arcade machine.
Cooking 2015-02-09 22:09:49 +0000
Andrew Havens

* Building A "Steampunk Presentation Manipulation Apparatus" With A Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi makes a fine little conference presentation machine, especially when it's packaged in a Steampunk theme. This talk highlights how to bring physical computing together with practical application to create a useful Linux-based device. I'll discuss idea generation, research, prototyping, challenges and use. We'll actually use the device with Libreoffice for the slides and a hacked Webcam to look at small parts.
Hacks 2015-03-08 19:22:54 +0000
Rob Reilly

* Compressing the white whale: how to learn by re-inventing.

"So this is where I made my biggest mistake, and I really still chuckle about it to this day. I notice that sometimes, when I'm trying to convert a word into a number, it's actually longer than the original word. So I get clever and just said 'hey if the word is shorter, just use the word.' Hey hey awesome, another small efficiency. What was wrong with that? Bingo, that number was already in use. So now Moby Dick compresses beautifully into an even smaller file, and even looks okay at first glance, until you try to read and see about half the sentences are now gibberish"
Cooking 2015-03-13 20:59:52 +0000
Toby Fee

* Corporate Source vs. Open Source

Has Open Source sold out? Has the corporate world somehow managed to take over the soul of open source without anyone noticing? When did open source "projects" requiring hundreds of thousands of dollars to participate become a thing?! In this talk we'll explore this and what it means for the OSS community at large.
Culture 2015-03-10 20:18:07 +0000
John Coggeshall

* Create your Making Money Machine

No, it's not a BitCoin mining machine. See what kind of vending machine you can create using open hardware and FOSS
Hacks 2015-01-20 17:29:20 +0000
Jeff Prestes

* Developing Fault-Tolerant Software With Your Favorite Programming Language

Fault-tolerance is more than handling unexpected signals, events and exceptions. It includes handling complete crashes gracefully along with memory corruption or invalid state that leads to crashes. All programmers are human and no actively developed source code can be completely perfect.
Cooking 2015-02-25 02:55:44 +0000
Michael Truog

* Experiences Leading a User Group

This talk will walk through the timeline from when I first became involved as the organizer of a local user group, the good, the bad and where we are now. Not only will we look at my experience with the organizational aspect of leading a user group but also how group members can play an active and important role just as with an open source project.
Culture 2015-03-11 17:36:20 +0000
Chris Schaefer

* Growing up; what’s a techie to do in their mid 30s to keep their career moving

In this session, I’ll share my journey from developer to evangelist to business development. You’ll learn how I got there, what I learned along the way, and what you should look for in order to determine when it makes sense to do a career transition.
Culture 2015-01-21 22:55:37 +0000
John Mertic

* Growing your open source project

Many open source software projects are interested in growing their user and contributor bases, but it can be hard to know where to start. This workshop will cover a number of steps projects can take to be more welcoming. Participants will work through a variety of structured, hands-on activities.
Culture 2015-03-05 03:12:34 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* How I learned to stop worrying and love crowdfunding

Are you an open source programmer looking to get more support for your work? Here's what we learned from our crowdfunding campaigns.
Business 2015-03-11 02:32:12 +0000
Mazarine Treyz, Steve Havelka

* How to Get a Software Job without Experience

Getting your first job is a Catch-22: to get a job, you need experience; to get experience, you need a job. Or do you?
Culture 2015-03-05 04:48:38 +0000
Charles Anderson

* Improving performance with responsive (and responsible!) images

Attendees can expect concrete examples of how the new `picture` element and `srcset` attribute work, and to learn how they can use responsive and responsible images right now to improve performance and deliver the best possible experience to their users.
Chemistry 2015-03-14 22:56:12 +0000
David Newton

* Intermediate Bash

Level up your command line skills. Get tips for moving beyond mere proficiency at the command line.
Hacks 2015-03-06 08:56:55 +0000
Amy Boyle

* JavaScript and Internet Controlled Hardware Prototyping

In this session we'll be exploring how to build rapid hardware prototypes using wifi and bluetooth low energy enabled Arduino boards, all controlled through JavaScript and API data, to allow for innovative, web enabled, software to hardware development techniques.
Hacks 2015-01-29 20:45:21 +0000
Jonathan LeBlanc

* Keep calm, it's reverse engineering time

As developers, sometimes we have to investigate a bug, or add a new feature in a codebase that is completely new to us, often with no one available to ask anything about that code. How can we do this?
Cooking 2015-03-07 10:37:03 +0000
Alissa Bonas

* maintaining sanity

an exploration of how i (failed?) to maintain several dozen foss projects, while maintaining my sanity
Culture 2015-03-06 15:46:49 +0000
Igor Galić

* Making music with Free/Libre/Open tools

The range of options for music-making on GNU/Linux with free/libre/open tools stretches from music-focused programming languages like CSound and PureData to simple tools like Audacity, Ardour, Guitarix, Hydrogen, and Musescore which are accessible to novice members of the general public. We'll explore the options for different sorts of musical creativity, focusing on the basic tools and how to get them set up effectively on GNU/Linux. In the session, we'll produce some brief compositions and recordings as we explore the software.
Hacks 2015-03-08 05:00:14 +0000
Aaron Wolf

* Mastering Bootstrap: how to get the most out of Bootstrap by writing modular CSS themes

Take Bootstrap to the next level by learning how to setup a development environment with harp.js, setup a Less variable and mixin library, make your theme modular, and deploy your theme for use on your projects or for sale on a marketplace.
Cooking 2015-01-11 08:36:42 +0000
Matt Lambert

* Never do the same thing twice

Use tools like Chef, Ansible, Docker and Terraform to not do things over and over.
Chemistry 2015-03-14 21:43:09 +0000
Amy Pivo

* Onboarding and Mentoring Apprentices

Our work, industry, and culture can benefit from bringing fresh eyes into engineering. I’ve personally heard from many industry veterans that they want to mentor new engineers, but don’t know how to initiate a program or convince an organization that Apprentice engineers will add value to a team. Mentoring is rewarding for the apprentice and the Mentor, and a good mentor is critical for helping new engineers succeed.
Culture 2015-03-08 04:53:31 +0000
Mercedes Coyle

* Open Hardware and why it matters - MinnowBoard MAX case study

Open hardware is poised to change the world, particularly with the oncoming onslaught of IoT. If we can successfully migrate more of the industry to a model more closely resembling the open source software movement, we genuinely do stand a chance of changing the world.
Hacks 2015-03-08 07:01:48 +0000
John Hawley

* Open Power: Electoral Reform and Public Empowerment

“When we relate and share knowledge authentically, this places us in a state of grace, a state of 'win-win' harmony with all others, and establishes trust among all.” “The bottom line is that our government is not intelligent about how it pursues the public interest, because its decisions are not informed decisions (and its interest is generally not the public's).” “I realized in 1988 that my life as a spy specializing in secrets was not only unproductive, it was in sharp opposition to what we actually need: full access to true information, and consequently, the ability to create Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT).”
Culture 2015-01-20 14:59:38 +0000
Robert David Steele

* Open Source Hardware for Community Science

Closed-source scientific instrumentation doesn't work for community science. It's too expensive, too precise and delicate, and can't be repaired or rebuilt easily. Open-source hardware allows for a means of creating massive deployments of sensing systems, and pulling their data outputs together. This is the wave of the future.
Chemistry 2015-01-23 20:30:56 +0000
Pete Marchetto

* Pop Open a Kernel

Ever wanted to build a simple kernel for a small computer? Curious how an OS starts and how it communicates with your keyboard and screen? Together, we'll build a simple arm kernel from scratch. No experience in assembly language or knowledge about CPU architecture is required, just some basic knowledge of C/C++ and curiosity about how things work under the hood.
Cooking 2015-03-12 02:54:04 +0000
Ian Kronquist

* Ruby for Beginners: A Tour of the Ruby Language and Ecosystem

An introduction to Ruby programming for those who are new to software or new to Ruby specifically.
Chemistry 2015-03-07 17:45:03 +0000
Jonan Scheffler

* Sass: What It Is, How It's Used, and Why It's So Syntactically Awesome

This talk will start off with the basics of what Syntactically Awesome StyleSheets are, what features and functionality they have to offer, and why they're a great tool to have in your arsenal. We'll then delve into how to use Sass in developing your own sites and what tools you'll want to use alongside it, complete with a live demo and some in-production examples.
Cooking 2015-02-13 20:41:18 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* So You Want To Write A Tech Article

Have you ever said, “I could write an article about that!”? Imagine what it feels like to walk into Barnes & Noble, pick up a magazine and see your article featured right there on the cover. Who do you contact? What's the process? What the heck is step one? In this talk, you'll get an insider's look at breaking into the mysterious world of tech article writing, from an industry veteran.
Hacks 2015-03-04 17:06:42 +0000
Rob Reilly

* Talmudic Maxims to Maximize Your Growth as a Developer

You’ve been programming for a while now. You’re beginning to feel that you’ve got a handle on things but at the same time can’t escape the feeling that you’ve somehow plateaued in your growth as a software developer. In this talk Yitzchok, a rabbinic scholar and software developer, shares the “wisdom of the sages” as practical, actionable advice – strategies and tactics – that you can use to reinvigorate your growth as a software developer.
Culture 2015-02-27 16:41:28 +0000
Yitzchok Willroth

* The Dead Language Fallacy

Our precious programming languages are being struck with a plague. Each year another language is declared dead or dying. But is that true or simply the tech equivalent of tabloid reporting?
Culture 2015-03-07 21:17:21 +0000
VM Brasseur

* Welcome to the (home office) jungle

Working remotely can be great. It can also be terrible. All that freedom! All that flexibility! None of that pesky human contact! Of course, it's not all sunshine and roses (particularly that last one), and I'll be talking about how to balance remote work to get the most out of it.
Business 2015-01-20 00:50:16 +0000
Adam Harvey

* Who wants to make video games?

"So how do you get that beautiful art style that you really want? Your game is done, maybe feature complete, but it's either got your crummy drawings or just grey rectangles dancing around. The music, the sound, the look of a game like 'Dungeon of the Endless' or 'Journey,' how do you get THAT? I have good news for you: there are more artists than there are coders, and more musicians than there are human beings on earth. Yes you'll have to pay them, yes you'll have to handle some conversations about expectations, and I'll cover that shortly, but really it will amaze you how easy it is to find truly beautiful resources to populate your game"
Business 2015-03-13 21:11:48 +0000
Toby Fee

* Why nobody cares about your GitHub project

Open source is hard. Everybody tells you to create a GitHub account and start throwing your code out there. Once you do, you realize that nobody really cares. In this talk, we'll see what you can do to increase the visibility of your work and how this can dramatically affect the quality of your project.
Chemistry 2015-02-24 15:16:27 +0000
Zeno Rocha

* Writing debuggable code

Let's talk about the Do's and Don'ts that make code easier to debug (because let's face it, we will all write bugs at some point in our coding careers).
Cooking 2015-03-08 04:31:29 +0000
Jonathan Harker

* Your Ops Stack is a Category

The core strategy of managing complexity in computer science and programming is leveraging abstraction. Category Theory is a branch of mathematics dedicated to dealing with abstraction. It sounds like a match made in heaven, since so many of our best technologies are inspired by mathematics: PageRank, routing, graphs, and computers themselves.
Chemistry 2015-03-15 06:58:30 +0000
Brandon Crisp

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Few Python Tips

Nothing fancy here, just several tips that help you work effectively with Python. This talk is licensed CC BY; please feel free to reuse it at your company or conference.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara

* Build your own exobrain

Online services like "If This Then That" (IFTTT) are great for automating your life. However they provide limited ways for the end-user to add their own services, and often require credentials that one may normally wish to keep secret. The 'exobrain' project allows for service integration and extension on a machine *you* control.
Cooking
Paul Fenwick

* From the Bottom Up: Building Community-Owned and -Operated Mesh Networks

This panel highlights the work of a few folks representing part of a broad, international movement consisting of network engineers, community change makers, researchers, architects, and thinkers who are building decentralized and autonomous communications infrastructure. We know that the Internet is deeply broken, and we are rebuilding, from the inside out. We mitigate the ills of interception and interference on the net by facilitating networks that are owned, operated, and governed by the people that use them.
Culture
Jenny Ryan, Mitar Milutinovic, Marc Juul, Russell Senior

* How to make generics in C: an adventure in sorting

This will be a talk on how to hack C to get generics-like support, which we used to make a super-fast C sorting library, all in headers. We'll also talk about sorting in general, and the various kinds of sorting algorithms, and why this hack helps so much.
Hacks
Christopher Swenson

* How to Run 100 User Tests in Two Days

Have you ever dreamed of running a vast quantity of user tests in a very short amount of time? Let me show you how I pulled this off at two conferences.
Hacks
Daniel Sauble

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Knitting for programmers

Yeah, you've seen us knitting during talks. I promise we're paying more attention than the people with their laptops open. Well, now learn how we do what we do... the programmer way. I'll start with the topology of individual stitches and go through geometry to design patterns, and by the end of it you'll know how to knit a sweater.
Hacks
Alex Bayley

* Know Thy Neighbor: Scikit and the K-Nearest Neighbor Algorithm

This presentation will give a brief overview of machine learning, the k-nearest neighbor algorithm and Scikit-learn. Sometimes developers need to make decisions, even when they don't have all of the required information. Machine learning attempts to solve this problem by using known data (a training data sample) to make predictions about the unknown. For example, usually a user doesn't tell Amazon explicitly what type of book they want to read, but based on the user's purchasing history, and the user's demographic, Amazon is able to induce what the user might like to read.
Cooking
Portia Burton

* Making Your Privacy Software Usable

Privacy enhancing technologies (PETs), like onion routing, PGP, and OTR often achieve a high level of security, but user experience (UX) built on top of the protocols is often a development afterthought. Without a concerted effort to examine how the system is used, people accidentally compromise their data or never attempt to use PETs. This talk will show you PET design done right and wrong through the lens of standard UX evaluation techniques. Our goal is to enable you to incorporate UX principles into your hacking from day 0.
Chemistry
Jen Davidson, Sean McGregor

* Math vs. Mathematics

Most people got through their high school math classes by memorizing nonsensical statements and regurgitating them on command. If you came out of that class hating math, no one would blame you, especially not a mathematician. However, that class didn't teach Intro to Algebra, it taught Intermediate Following Instructions.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh, Jenner Hanni

* Modern Home Automation

There are a few different options available to you to control your home automation system. Many manufacturers make it convenient to use their system by not only making a convenient to install their products and use their interface, but will actually host all the software portions for you. Many provide apps for your IOS or Android device and have web interfaces for your laptop as well, making the control of these devices very streamlined and simple, especially if there are many devices to be managed. Other more DIY-approach solutions also have interfaces to control your automation, although require a bit more setup. For example, with the power strip in the previous example, you first need to connect it to your wireless network, and then you'll be able to use the supplied phone/tablet app to toggle the ports on/off. As with anything DIY: The sky's the limit, although it requires more technical understanding of what's going on.
Cooking
Ben Kero

* Modernizing a Stagnant Toolbox

WordPress turned 10 years old in May of 2013. On that day, the main repo didn't contain a single tool to make it easier for developers to work with and contribute code. Over the last year, this is how and why we changed all that.
Hacks
Aaron Jorbin

* Nest + Pellet Stove + Yurt

Nest is a twenty-first century take on a nineteenth century thermostat. A pellet stove is a modern version of a campfire that won't burn the house down. A modern yurt is a high tech tent based on an age old Mongolian design. Can they all work together?
Hacks
Lars Lohn

* Open Hardware from Breadboard to PCB

So you've built a breadboard circuit with wires everywhere. What's next? A printed circuit board! I'll talk about your open hardware development options through the lens of my recent project turning a breadboard prototype into a finished Arduino shield for a curing oven at Portland State.
Cooking
Jenner Hanni

* Open Lighting Architecture: Blinky Lights!

Target audience will anyone with a interest into doing atypical stuff with SoC platforms including professional and hobbyist level implementations. Even if it's a simple XMAS light display, complex LED panel setup, or even driving consumer products like Hue lights.
Cooking
Matt Ranostay

* Random

If you want to understand randomness better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Replacing `import` with `accio`: Compiling Pythons with Custom Grammar for the sake of a joke

In Python, overwriting builtin functions is fairly easy. You can even do it in the interpreter! But can you overwrite a statement, like import, just as easily? Let's go on an adventure, discovering how the import statement works, and how Python statements are defined in the CPython source code. We'll face some consequences of bootstrapping, and, to get our custom Harry Potter-themed Grammar to work, we'll have to compile a Python to compile a Python.
Chemistry
Amy Hanlon

* Rocket Science On Github

Git isn't just for code. What about CAD files? Experimental test data? How do you manage a multidisciplinary project with git? Last year Portland State Aerospace Society, a relatively large open source rocketry project, moved all their work onto github. I'll share my experience with the switch from a few self hosted git repos to a full fledged github presence. What worked, what hasn't, github's features for non coders, and a little on the future of open science.
Culture
Nathan Bergey

* The 20,000km view: How GPS works

GPS is more than just letting your phone tell you where you are. I believe GPS is a contender for "most amazing piece of engineering in the history of humanity", and I'll show you why.
Chemistry
Jamey Sharp

* Utilizing open source medical systems to reach the next 33 million

There is an increase in double burden of diseases in developing countries accruing from the rise of non communicable and infectious diseases. This situation is worsened by lack of adequate financing, inadequate infrastructure for delivering health care, low health literacy and inadequate personnel. Health information systems drive the global health agenda , and huge investments are continuously being made to bridge the digital divide to improve health care delivery. 1. What are the opportunities to effectively deploy open source technologies in developing countries? 2. How do we create ownership, partnerships and collaborations that support scaling open source medical records system 3. What are the effective design thinking techniques that drive development of open source record systems
Business
judy wawira

* When Many Eyes Fail You: Tales from Security Standards and Open Source

It's often said that "given many eyes, all bugs are shallow" and open source proponents love to list this as a reason that open source is more secure than its closed-source relatives. While that makes a nice sound bite, the reality of security with many eyeballs doesn't fit so nicely into a tweet. This talk will explore some of the things that surprised me in going from academic security research to industry security research in open source and open standards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* Working Effectively with People in Government on Open Source Projects

Ever thought about ways to use your open source skills to improve your city? In this session we'll talk about successful models for working with people in government, from pitching your project, communicating effectively, finding experts, tracking down data, to launching in the community.
Culture
Jason Denizac

* xmonad: the window manager that (practically) reads your mind

Many desktop environments try to be easy to use for the average user, but that's not you. You're at your computer all day writing code; you don't have time to waste _dragging windows_ (ugh!) or watching _animated transitions_ (yuck!). David Brewer will demonstrate how by using xmonad, a tiling window manager, you can bend your desktop to your will and control your windows with telepathy. Kind of.
Cooking
David Brewer

Favorite proposals for this user

* Apprenticeships: I implore you!

Talk Outline: My background pre-programming Attending gSchool (6 month Ruby on Rails program), hired as an apprentice Why we need apprenticeships What senior developers and teams get out of apprenticeships What you can do / My suggestions for working with apprentices
Culture 2014-03-12 20:14:09 +0000
Jennifer Eliuk

* Automating cloud factories and Internet assembly lines with open source software

Open source software is used to automate the building and orchestration of the modern Web and all of its parts. This talk will explain how open source software is used to automate the cloud factories and Internet assembly lines of our day.
Chemistry 2014-04-05 05:57:28 +0000
Thomas Hatch

* Breeding Hackers the hard way

There is no easy path into knowledge, but a "bait" can lead one individual into taking the hard path.
Culture 2014-04-11 22:06:39 +0000
Rodrigo Chiossi

* C++11 From the Trenches

"I'm from the C++ standards committee, and I'm here to help." Are they really? The 2011 revision of the language contains a ton of changes that are supposed to help us solve problems. But which problems, and why? In this presentation, we're going cut through the bullet lists and get right to the parts of C++11 that can actually make life easier for programmers.
Cooking 2014-04-11 18:33:53 +0000
Ian Dees

* Clueless to Collaborator on a Github Open Source Project

Even if you have development chops, learning git and open source culture can be confusing and intimidating. Or maybe you're an experienced open-sourcer looking to gain insight as to how to get more people involved. Either way, come hear the tale of a knowledgeable fool's journey to becoming a collaborator on Ractive.js.
Culture 2014-04-05 06:27:50 +0000
Marty Nelson

* How "Open" Changes Product Development

There's a lot of speculation about open source product development. How can a product with "no IP" be competitive? What are the viable business models, when the code is freely available? And how am I supposed to build and take a viable product to market if my company is focused on services, not products? The truth is, you can build -- and successfully take to market -- an open source product. But the rules are different, and must not be ignored.
Business 2014-04-11 23:56:43 +0000
Karen Borchert

* Learn by Making: How We Construct Our Knowledge and Skills

We learn by making things, sharing them, discussing them, and reflecting on them. Let's talk about the intersection of making and education, including constructionism, sharing what you make online, and more.
Culture 2014-03-06 00:25:24 +0000
Josh Bancroft

* Minding Bee

We made it to 1000 improvements in 1000 days, then slipped up and actually paid $1000 to one of our users.
Hacks 2014-04-05 06:55:55 +0000
Bethany Soule

* Open Infrastructure for an Open Company

Balanced is opening its infrastructure to the community, learn how and why.
Business 2014-04-05 03:28:45 +0000
Noah Kantrowitz

* Programming in the Small - Teaching my 5 Year Old Ruby

My children are growing up in an age of devices, phones and tablets, that hide so much of the underlying machine. Come with me on my journey to teach my daughter how computers really work, using Ruby and a love for drawing and games as our guides.
Culture 2014-04-02 23:05:10 +0000
Jason Clark

* Sharing is caring: friends, manage your resources!

Lots of modern languages help us out with automatic memory management, but for other types of resources, we're left in charge. I'll talk about some of the problems that can come out of poorly managing resources like files and database connections, and show you a few of the tools that language designers have given us to make this easier.
Chemistry 2014-04-05 04:40:05 +0000
Kamal Marhubi

* Systems programming as a swiss army knife

Why understanding some systems programming basics will make you a better developer.
Cooking 2014-03-28 03:12:24 +0000
Julia Evans

* The New Sheriff in Town

Congratulations, you got that new green-field job where no one has done what you're going to do.....now what?
Cooking 2014-03-21 05:49:55 +0000
H. Waterhouse

* Typographical Hacks for LibreOffice

Office suites are as old as the personal computer. Yet, after more than thirty years, few of us have bothered to learn how to use them. Oh, we have learned how to get things done in them. Most of us can format a document and print it out, after a fashion. But what we haven't learned is to do these things efficiently, taking advantage of all the tools that are available. It is as if we have learned enough about cars to go down hill in them and coast across level ground, but never learned about the ignition. We get things done, but with more effort and less efficiency that we should. Some tasks, like going uphill, we don't imagine are even possible because of our limited view. Using any office suite to its full potential means knowing how to design your documents – and nine-tenths of design is knowing how to use styles and templates. Knowing how to use styles and templates is the equivalent of being handed the key to that coasting car and shown the gas pedal – suddenly, you can take full control of the vehicle, instead of getting by on clumsy makeshifts.
Hacks 2014-03-22 03:53:25 +0000
Bruce Byfield

* What's preventing your organization from using Free/Open Source Software today?

It's 2014, and even your parents have heard the terms "open source" and "linux". Your project dutifully releases source code and contributes to the community, but you're still dependent upon proprietary software, even when perfectly good FOSS alternatives exist. If there's an open alternative, why aren't you using it? As a project, what specific actions can you take to help other FOSS projects escape proprietary software and use your software instead?
Culture 2014-04-05 05:55:38 +0000
Robinson Tryon

* When Harry Met Iannis - 2014

An exploration of music composed and synthesized by open source software. This piece has been through three incarnations - 2001 (Perl and Sfront), 2004 (Lisp and MIDI) and 2009 - back to Perl and Sfront (https://soundcloud.com/znmeb/sets/when-harry-met-iannis-2009). It's time to revisit 'When Harry Met Iannis' - better algorithms, more modern languages, and more complex instruments.
Cooking 2014-04-12 06:00:39 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Why You Should Be An Open Source Project

You are a collection of code. You’ve got an initial commit from your parents, pull requests of childhood influences, and now you, a grown up project. How do you continue to “develop” as a human? You expose your internals and merge pull requests. IRL, that means sharing your self genuinely and integrating lessons from others. The same things that make a good open source project make a happy person.
Culture 2014-04-11 19:08:20 +0000
Carol Huang

* You can be a kernel hacker

Writing operating systems sounds like it's only for wizards, but it turns out that operating systems are written by humans like you and me. I'm going to tell you what a kernel is and why you should care. Then we'll talk about a few concrete ways to get started with kernel hacking, ranging from the super-easy to the terrifyingly difficult.
Chemistry 2014-03-06 17:42:15 +0000
Julia Evans