Ian Burrell's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Build your own exobrain

Online services like "If This Then That" (IFTTT) are great for automating your life. However they provide limited ways for the end-user to add their own services, and often require credentials that one may normally wish to keep secret. The 'exobrain' project allows for service integration and extension on a machine *you* control.
Cooking
Paul Fenwick

* Data Wrangling: Getting Started Working with Data for Visualizations

Good data visualization allows us to leverage the incredible pattern-recognition abilities of the human brain to answer questions we care about. But how do you make a good visualization? Here's a crash course.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Geek Choir

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* IPv6 for Programmers

IPv4 is running out of addresses. IPv6 is the Internet Protocol which gives plenty of addresses for the future. It is starting to be deployed widely and open source applications and programming languages need to support it.
Chemistry
Ian Burrell

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Modern Home Automation

There are a few different options available to you to control your home automation system. Many manufacturers make it convenient to use their system by not only making a convenient to install their products and use their interface, but will actually host all the software portions for you. Many provide apps for your IOS or Android device and have web interfaces for your laptop as well, making the control of these devices very streamlined and simple, especially if there are many devices to be managed. Other more DIY-approach solutions also have interfaces to control your automation, although require a bit more setup. For example, with the power strip in the previous example, you first need to connect it to your wireless network, and then you'll be able to use the supplied phone/tablet app to toggle the ports on/off. As with anything DIY: The sky's the limit, although it requires more technical understanding of what's going on.
Cooking
Ben Kero

* OAuth, IndieAuth, and the Future of Authorization APIs

You use OAuth every time you log in to Facebook or Twitter, but what if you could use it from your own website? What if your own domain became a source of data, and you had your own personal API? By decentralizing authorization to your own domain instead of a silo, you control when, how, and to whom your data is shared.
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* Rocket Science On Github

Git isn't just for code. What about CAD files? Experimental test data? How do you manage a multidisciplinary project with git? Last year Portland State Aerospace Society, a relatively large open source rocketry project, moved all their work onto github. I'll share my experience with the switch from a few self hosted git repos to a full fledged github presence. What worked, what hasn't, github's features for non coders, and a little on the future of open science.
Culture
Nathan Bergey

* Supporting communities with Gittip

There are lots of people doing good work in the world, and while there seems to be a myriad of ways to provide financial "donations", few of them provide a way to do so in a sustainable manner. We're going to look at Gittip, a freedom loving platform to provide a sustainable, predictable income to those making the world a better place.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* The Case for Junior Developers

Are you passionate about building tech, but think there is no place in your organization for junior developers? Come explore the true costs and benefits of hiring junior developers and see how you can improve your company while helping juniors become the best developers they can be.
Culture
Shawna Scott

* The Promise of Collaborative Magic

Open source thrives on the idea of people helping one another in reaching their project's goals. But is it working the way that it's supposed to be? This session hopes to discuss the importance of constructive collaboration in our communities, how we encourage them, and what we can do if they're not working out the way they're supposed to.
Culture
Josh Lim

* When Many Eyes Fail You: Tales from Security Standards and Open Source

It's often said that "given many eyes, all bugs are shallow" and open source proponents love to list this as a reason that open source is more secure than its closed-source relatives. While that makes a nice sound bite, the reality of security with many eyeballs doesn't fit so nicely into a tweet. This talk will explore some of the things that surprised me in going from academic security research to industry security research in open source and open standards.
Culture
Terri Oda