Howard Abrams's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* An Introduction to ClojureScript

ClojureScript is a fun, productive language that compiles to JavaScript. Though its syntax is a different its functional immutable nature lets you be productive when developing complex web applications.
Theory
Julio Barros

* Demystifying Regular Expressions

Long ago, in the early ages of computerdom, a language was formed from the primordial fires of Tartarus. The language would bind the spells of textual strings and forever control them: The Regular Expression. How about an interactive workshop for acolytes who wish to command this strong magic?
Practice
Howard Abrams

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Besides, great mentors are critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Graph Databases WIll Change Your Freakin Life

Most developer have worked with relational DBs like MySQL or PostgreSQL, but for many use cases they aren't the best option. Graph databases have a simpler, more powerful model for handling complex related data. In this talk we'll work with Neo4j to explore the advantages of graph DBs. Attendees will learn the graph model, how graph DBs let you do things that are practically impossible with SQL, and the best options for integrating one into your application -- new or existing.
Practice
Ed Finkler

* Introduction to Neural Networks with Tensorflow

I intend to introduce Neural Networks as a very simple concept. This can be achieved with Google's newest open-source library in Python called Tensorflow. I want to dispel the myth that Neural Networks are hard to understand and implement. I also want to introduce the current state of Neural Networks as they are continually changing the landscape of visual recognition and natural language processing.
Theory
Nick McClure

* Machine Learning 101: How to get started with Convolutional Neural Networks

Machine learning and especially convolutional neural networks are on the rise. With the sheer limitless amount of data and cheap computation power, neural networks can now solve problems which have been fairly complex in the past. Cole and Hannes will demonstrate how you implement a convolutional neural network with a few lines of Python code to classify images, recognize voices or understand texts.
Theory
Hannes Hapke, Cole Howard

* Open sourced tools for Agent Based Modeling

Agent-based modeling is a technique used to explore both complexity and emergence by simulating individual actors and their actions inside of a system. Think of systems such as the traffic in the city or financial markets where one actor can have an effect on the decisions of others until the system’s direction changes its course. During this survey, you will gain an understanding of open source software available in a variety of languages and how to get started quickly.
Practice
Jackie Kazil

* Turning Sensors into Signals: Humanizing IoT with Old Smartphones and the Web

People are already tired of the over-promise of IoT - the slew of marginally useful products, the overly confusing and crowded developer space, and endless examples of how to turn an LED on and off. Take a break, step back from the crowd, and come learn how to solve real human problems with that old phone that's collecting dust on your shelf.
Hacks
Rabimba Karanjai

* Type Theory 101

Have you heard about type theory and always wanted to understand the principles behind it, but always thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of Lambda Calculus and algebras? This talk will approach these concepts in a friendly way.
Theory
Hanneli Tavante

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Pair Programming Workshop

Pair programming is a great way to collaborate on code and to share new ideas and techniques, but the social dynamics can be challenging. In this session, we'll talk about what works and what doesn't, and practice some techniques for better pairing!
Culture
Moss Collum, L Dean

* Aesthetics and the Evolution of Code

Elegance is an aesthetic experience. It’s about perfectly conforming to a set of imperfect standards, meeting a need with no extraneous lines or rough edges. Elegance in code is the result of a mysterious process, just as elegance in nature is— in the case of nature, the process is evolution.
Culture
Coraline Ada Ehmke

* Catalyzing Diversity: Practical Advice for Navigating Minority STEM Communities to Open Up Open Source

How can Open Source Software projects attract minorities? Come to learn practical strategies to implement your diversity goals into actionable outreach efforts. We will describe ways to tap into minority STEM communities that exist both online and in meatspace. The former include Tweet chats and hashtags used by people of color who are enthusiasts of science (like #BLACKandSTEM) and tech (like #LATISM). The live events include annual conferences of minority students and professionals such as the Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing.
Culture
Alberto Roca, Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Fear Driven Development

Have you ever not made a much-needed change because you were afraid of breaking something? Caution is wise, but too much fear can leave even the most agile of software organizations with a crippling aversion to change. This talk will discuss what makes us scared, why it hurts us, and my experiences helping a team I managed get rid of some of our fears.
Culture
Ryan Kennedy

* Good Enough Voter Verification & Other Identity Architecture Schemes for Online Communities

This talk is a deep dive into considerations for Identity Architecture for online communities. It's most specifically applications for political action, civic engagement, or virtual nations. I'll talk about pragmatic solutions for voter verification using the state voter registration database, schemes for peer to peer authentication, offline/online identification, Impartial Identity Architecture to control conflict, and more. The discussion is high level and appropriate for beginners, but there will be links to code and big ideas.
Culture
Ele Mooney

* Hacking Minecraft!

Minecraft is an incredibly popular game with developers. I'll give a brief tour of opportunities to practice your craft in the Minecraft world and walkthrough some tutorials using popular open source projects.
Chemistry
Jonan Scheffler

* How to Really Get Git

You already know how to use “git status”, “git push”, and “git add” for your personal projects. You know how to work on a team project with git version control. How do you achieve the next level of git mastery and fix mistakes? We’ll cover how to set up your git environment for a productive workflow, different ways to undo your mistakes in git, and finally, how to use the IPython notebook to automate an entire git workflow.
Hacks
Susan Tan

* How to Teach Git

Version control is a necessary piece of the open source community and git has an unfortunately steep learning curve. Here is what I have learned from teaching git to beginners, so you don’t have to make the same mistakes.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh

* How We Learned To Stop Worrying And Love (Or At Least Live With) GitHub

In the past few years, GitHub has become the most widely used platform for managing open source projects, thanks to the ease it provides for submitting and accepting pull requests. However, GitHub's issue tracker is not as full featured as more venerable bug trackers such as Bugzilla, and it is not as easy to use for organizations which have a large number of casual contributors. Come hear how one organization coped with the sudden loss of their Bugzilla database by restructuring their tracking workflow to use GitHub's built-in issue management features, as well as implementing API hooks to provide missing functionality.
Cooking
Jen Griffin, Athena Yao

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Humanising Math and Physics on Computer Science

There are some myths around Science - it's boring, useless, difficult. Many of them are heard while we are young, and many people tend to take then for the entire life. Science is very important, specially on Computer Science and Engineering, for building the basis of our logical thinking.
Culture
Hanneli Tavante

* kenny_g.rb: Making Ruby Write Smooth Jazz

For too long, computers have been shut out of the red-hot music-to-listen-to-while-relaxing-in-the-bathtub genre. Today, that all changes. Our smooth-jazz-as-a-service startup is primed to disrupt this stale industry. All we need is a little Ruby and we'll make automated musical magic.
Hacks
Tim Krajcar

* Leveraging Docker to Enable Learning

When giving workshops or presenting online tutorials, it's frequently the case that the system setup can take longer than the actual learning exercises. Using Docker to provide a learning sandbox solves this problem while avoiding changing the learner's system in potentially destructive ways.
Cooking
Kirsten Hunter

* Open source collaboration for tackling real world environmental problems

Public Lab is a two-part project -- an attempt at large-scale community environmental monitoring, AND a massively distributed R&D lab for inventing new monitoring techniques and equipment. The community has grown a lot over the past five years, and we are here to share stories of -- and welcome you to -- an emerging FOSS culture that spans hardware, software, data, community organizing, and advocacy.
Culture
Dana Bauer, Mathew Lippincott

* Software Archeology and The Code Of Doom

You approach the legacy codebase with trepidation. If the vine-draped entrance and collapsing roof weren't enough warning, traces of previous explorers before you lie scattered about, caught in bizarre traps and oubliettes. What next, snakes?!
Chemistry
Kerri Miller

* Troubleshooting In Distributed Systems

The shift to microservice and distributed architectures has made software products more flexible and scalable-- and a lot more complex. With so many moving parts, ephemeral conditions and the spectre of partial failure, it can be much more difficult to pinpoint how and why things break. Learn how Logstash, Elasticsearch and Kibana can be used to monitor healthy systems and investigate issues as they pop up, and what we can do outside of software to improve our process of problem-solving.
Chemistry
Megan Baker

Favorite proposals for this user

* 5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started Programming

There's more to being a successful developer than simply being great at programming.
Culture 2015-02-03 05:55:25 +0000
Kerri Miller

* Automate Yo'self

One of the greatest productivity boosts you can have as a programmer is optimizing your working environment to more tightly integrate your tools and remove inefficiencies. Come learn a number of tips, tricks, and tools that can make your programming experience faster and better.
Cooking 2015-03-08 05:44:12 +0000
John Anderson

* Better Meetings: 15 Tools in 45 Minutes

A lot can happen online, but sometimes you’ve just got to have face-to-face meetings with groups of clients or co-workers. They can be great! Or they can be a great big waste of time. This rapid fire presentation will take you through 15 tools you can use to get everyone focused at the beginning of your meeting, inspire creative collaboration during it, and make sure everyone goes home feeling good about what happened.
Business 2015-03-08 03:33:29 +0000
Maggie Starr

* Engaging Nepali Kids with Free Software

Last year, I spent six months volunteering with a Nepali educational non-profit called Open Learning Exchange, which develops interactive educational activities for OLPC laptops used by students in elementary schools. During my talk, I will share my experience about what free software can do to provide better educational opportunities in these schools that lack resources and governmental support we take for granted.
Culture 2015-02-19 09:04:58 +0000
Martin Dluhoš

* Essential DevStack

OpenStack Development Demystified
Cooking 2015-02-17 11:49:54 +0000
Swapnil Kulkarni

* Get Your Shoes (Back) On!

Years ago the enigmatic Rubyist _why created Shoes, a tiny GUI toolkit for writing fun, simple applications in Ruby. Shoes served as the foundation for Hackety Hack, a programming environment specially designed to be accessible to kids.
Chemistry 2015-01-17 00:40:15 +0000
Jason Clark

* Hosting a Mini Workshops for Local User Groups

Discussion about how to both learn and host a mini-workshop for your local computer user group. Includes an actual walk-through a mini-workshop of SQL-interaction library.
Culture 2015-03-06 20:30:25 +0000
Howard Abrams

* How to hook your communications into Matrix

Matrix is a new ecosystem for decentralised IP communications, using simple HTTP APIs to exchange data (messages, VoIP, IoT data etc) between clients and servers in an entirely decentralised manner - with conversations not being controlled by any single party or silo. This hands-on tutorial session will * Give a quick overview of the architecture and rationale of the Matrix ecosystem * Show how to get up and running with your own matrix homeserver * Guide through using the client-server API for communication (looking at the API from the command-line as well as using various Matrix-enabled clients). * Demonstrate how to use Matrix to bridge together existing communication islands (IRC, XMPP, blogs, IoT data silos etc) using the Application Service API - letting the audience bridge their existing IRC channels etc into Matrix!
Chemistry 2015-03-08 10:49:34 +0000
Matthew Hodgson

* Machine Learning at Scale: Using Apache Spark and MLlib

A common problem of working with large sets of data is that machine learning tools are not able to scale effectively. Apache Spark is a fast, cluster computing engine that provides a rich toolset for machine learning called MLlib, which solves this problem of scaling.
Chemistry 2015-03-06 23:44:47 +0000
Sarah Guido

* Mobile Cloud Computing for the Data Scientist

An explanation of the key differences and problems that mobile cloud computing faces, as well as solutions to address some of these immediate challenges. A walk-through in the architecture of a large-scale mobile cloud, as well as a how-to explanation. We will then run a simple machine learning program, and explain where the data is being fetched from the cloud and how this data is being handled. We will then discuss what innovate smart apps do and how these apps take it to the next level.
Cooking 2015-03-08 03:53:11 +0000
Johanni Thunstrom

* Onboarding and Mentoring Apprentices

Our work, industry, and culture can benefit from bringing fresh eyes into engineering. I’ve personally heard from many industry veterans that they want to mentor new engineers, but don’t know how to initiate a program or convince an organization that Apprentice engineers will add value to a team. Mentoring is rewarding for the apprentice and the Mentor, and a good mentor is critical for helping new engineers succeed.
Culture 2015-03-08 04:53:31 +0000
Mercedes Coyle

* Open Source Hardware for Community Science

Closed-source scientific instrumentation doesn't work for community science. It's too expensive, too precise and delicate, and can't be repaired or rebuilt easily. Open-source hardware allows for a means of creating massive deployments of sensing systems, and pulling their data outputs together. This is the wave of the future.
Chemistry 2015-01-23 20:30:56 +0000
Pete Marchetto

* RESTful Micro-service communication over AMQP

In the last several years, the web application has evolved from “monolith” to collection of APIs. In this presentation, we discuss the advantages, the difficulties, and some of the technologies involved in getting APIs to talk with each other successfully.
Chemistry 2015-03-09 15:25:40 +0000
Serge Domkowski

* Stuck in the MUD: Writing a Scalable & Asynchronous TCP Server in Ruby

An introduction of CarbonMU, my new open-source Ruby MUD platform, and Celluloid, the underlying Ruby concurrent/actor-based programming framework.
Chemistry 2015-03-07 00:41:49 +0000
Tim Krajcar

* Teaching Middle School to Program

This past year, I started an experiment and took a different approach to teaching middle school students how to program: Nothing. And you can do nothing too!
Culture 2015-02-07 04:24:27 +0000
Howard Abrams

* Technical Career Advice Discussion Panel

Are you starting your career in technology or already a seasoned vet? Come get advice and share what you have in a open discussion!
Business 2015-03-08 03:58:44 +0000
Kasey Alusi, Howard Abrams

* Techniques and Tools for Literate DevOps

Lacking the Hermetic knowledge required to administrate servers, we take judicious notes and hyperlinks. Why not combine those written thoughts with the commands we enter to configure and tame our digital beasties? We have a tool for that.
Cooking 2015-02-07 04:41:11 +0000
Howard Abrams, Kasey Alusi

* The Dead Language Fallacy

Our precious programming languages are being struck with a plague. Each year another language is declared dead or dying. But is that true or simply the tech equivalent of tabloid reporting?
Culture 2015-03-07 21:17:21 +0000
VM Brasseur

* The End of JS Frameworks: ES6 and Web Components

JavaScript has a long history of being difficult to structure and maintain. To deal with this complexity a swath of frameworks have emerged over the years. At a glacial pace we have seen the web improve and those changes are ubiquitous now. ES6 and web components are happening! Come to this talk to learn how to get started with vanilla web platform code.
Hacks 2015-01-21 19:16:48 +0000
Brian LeRoux

* Virtualization for Developers

Learn how to create powerful virtualized development environments that are version-controlled and consistent.
Hacks 2015-03-10 20:13:59 +0000
John Coggeshall

* Welcome to the (home office) jungle

Working remotely can be great. It can also be terrible. All that freedom! All that flexibility! None of that pesky human contact! Of course, it's not all sunshine and roses (particularly that last one), and I'll be talking about how to balance remote work to get the most out of it.
Business 2015-01-20 00:50:16 +0000
Adam Harvey

* Why nobody cares about your GitHub project

Open source is hard. Everybody tells you to create a GitHub account and start throwing your code out there. Once you do, you realize that nobody really cares. In this talk, we'll see what you can do to increase the visibility of your work and how this can dramatically affect the quality of your project.
Chemistry 2015-02-24 15:16:27 +0000
Zeno Rocha