Emily St.'s favorites

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* Through the Warp Zone: Hacking Super Mario Brothers

Discover new worlds in Super Mario Brothers even the creators never saw!
Hacks
Emily St., Shawna Scott

Favorite proposals for this user

* 7 years of collaborative calendaring: Exploring Calagator

Seven years in, the Portland tech community's open source calendar aggregator, Calagator, has survived ups and downs, seen the outcome of those Ruby and Rails dogma shifts, and fundamentally changed the way people in Portland tech build community. In this combination talk and installfest, we'll explore the origins, history, impact, and future of Calagator, and how you can use Calagator to improve your local communities and increase engagement. Bring your laptops and your Ruby dev environments, and we'll walk through a fresh install!
Chemistry 2015-03-15 01:02:30 +0000
Shawna Scott

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Few Python Tips

Nothing fancy here, just several tips that help you work effectively with Python. This talk is licensed CC BY; please feel free to reuse it at your company or conference.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara

* Advanced Javascript Basics for Web Developers

Javascript is a necessity for modern web development. Whether it is to add more interactivity to your user interface, or provide a client to interact with your API, chances are, even if you're trying to avoid working in javascript, you're working in javascript. Projects like Coffeescript and Opal, while useful, still do not help understand the javascript outputted by these compile-able languages. One growing concern in this realm is that an application's javascript can sometimes be a security concern, easily exploited by a malicious user. In order to catch these concerns, you must know what your javascript does, inside and out. This talk will illustrate concepts to make sure your client code is secure, while still giving your team the flexibility it needs to keep building your stellar app!
Chemistry
Lauren Voswinkel

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Freedom, security and the cloud

Cloud hosting is cheap. Cloud hosting is easy. What compromises are you making when you deploy to the cloud, both in terms of your security and in terms of your dependency on proprietary software?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* How to make generics in C: an adventure in sorting

This will be a talk on how to hack C to get generics-like support, which we used to make a super-fast C sorting library, all in headers. We'll also talk about sorting in general, and the various kinds of sorting algorithms, and why this hack helps so much.
Hacks
Christopher Swenson

* IPv6 for Programmers

IPv4 is running out of addresses. IPv6 is the Internet Protocol which gives plenty of addresses for the future. It is starting to be deployed widely and open source applications and programming languages need to support it.
Chemistry
Ian Burrell

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Know Thy Neighbor: Scikit and the K-Nearest Neighbor Algorithm

This presentation will give a brief overview of machine learning, the k-nearest neighbor algorithm and Scikit-learn. Sometimes developers need to make decisions, even when they don't have all of the required information. Machine learning attempts to solve this problem by using known data (a training data sample) to make predictions about the unknown. For example, usually a user doesn't tell Amazon explicitly what type of book they want to read, but based on the user's purchasing history, and the user's demographic, Amazon is able to induce what the user might like to read.
Cooking
Portia Burton

* Open Sourcing Mental Illness: Ending The Stigma

An open, honest discussion of mental illness from the perspective of a web developer. We can learn to survive, cope, and thrive.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Replacing `import` with `accio`: Compiling Pythons with Custom Grammar for the sake of a joke

In Python, overwriting builtin functions is fairly easy. You can even do it in the interpreter! But can you overwrite a statement, like import, just as easily? Let's go on an adventure, discovering how the import statement works, and how Python statements are defined in the CPython source code. We'll face some consequences of bootstrapping, and, to get our custom Harry Potter-themed Grammar to work, we'll have to compile a Python to compile a Python.
Chemistry
Amy Hanlon

* Stop Crying in the Bathroom and Start Your Own Business

The tech industry has a 'diversity problem' and companies are courting women, people of color and other marginalized people as the pressure mounts to hire someone besides 24-year-old cis, straight white male programmers. However, for many marginalized people, working in startups, agencies, and large tech companies can be a miserable, demoralizing experience that literally results in crying in the bathroom. There's more to life than startups. Come hear ideas for making your own path in the tech industry, without compromising your dignity or your mental health.
Business
Kronda Adair

* The Case for Junior Developers

Are you passionate about building tech, but think there is no place in your organization for junior developers? Come explore the true costs and benefits of hiring junior developers and see how you can improve your company while helping juniors become the best developers they can be.
Culture
Shawna Scott

* Unicode Beyond Just Characters: Localization with the CLDR

Unicode is much more than just characters. The Unicode Consortium defines open standards for collating, parsing, and formatting data in much of the world’s languages. The Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) is the largest standard repository of locale data along with specifications for its use and is a powerful resource for software localization.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* Vim Your Way

You’ve learned to do things Vim’s way; now it’s time for Vim to learn to do things your way. We'll learn more about customizing Vim to fit your needs and workflow.
Cooking
Emily St.

Favorite proposals for this user

* Accessibility Evangelism for the Non-Specialist

So, you probably know why accessibility is important already (and if you don't we can talk about that a little too!). Maybe your blind friend uses your app, or you're super passionate about W3C standards. But you're having a hard time getting that idea across to the other people working on your project. How do you motivate people to work on accessibility, and change the perception that it's hard and obscure? This talk will draw from the toolboxes of accessibility evangelists and community managers. We'll discuss a range of strategies to help contributors understand the value of accessibility, and help you incentivize contributions in this area.
Culture 2014-04-11 03:04:28 +0000
Katherine Mancuso

* Deploying Perl Applications with Carton

Carton is Bundler for Perl. It allows installing a consistent set of modules local to an application. We use it to deploy large Perl applications
Cooking 2014-04-12 03:04:28 +0000
Ian Burrell

* Eat your open source software

A whirlwind tour of open source software (and open hardware, open data, and other open stuff) related to growing, distributing, cooking, and eating food. From seedbanks to recipes to food co-ops, there's open source alternatives to almost every part of the food system.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 16:39:18 +0000
Alex Bayley

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture 2014-04-04 16:50:29 +0000
Kat Toomajian

* The Coder as Artist: Painting with Pixels and Numbers

Popular culture would have us believe that programming and art are polar opposites. In reality, code is just another medium with which we are creating art every day. Learn how embracing code as our art and artists as our community will help us create a more beautiful and accessible world.
Culture 2014-04-05 05:06:15 +0000
Shawna Scott

* You can be a kernel hacker

Writing operating systems sounds like it's only for wizards, but it turns out that operating systems are written by humans like you and me. I'm going to tell you what a kernel is and why you should care. Then we'll talk about a few concrete ways to get started with kernel hacking, ranging from the super-easy to the terrifyingly difficult.
Chemistry 2014-03-06 17:42:15 +0000
Julia Evans

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* DIY: Creativity and Open Source

Panelists will discuss their uses of open source tools in creative applications, from design to art to hardware.
Culture
Melissa Chavez, Sarah Sharp, Cloë Latchkey, Cameron Adamez

* Expanding Your Empathy

I believe empathy is the core competency that is missing from much of the efforts to push the tech community in a direction towards more diversity of all kinds. Companies, communities and conferences cannot expect everything to magically change until they're willing to go deep and examine the systemic patterns and structures that keep underrepresented communities from feeling safe and welcome in the tech space.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* HOWTO on secure software design with threat modeling

Leigh tells you things about security.
Chemistry
Leigh Honeywell

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Just Don't Lick the Cookie: an open discussion about organizational dysfunction

When someone claims a task and then doesn't do anything with it, we call that "licking the cookie." Nobody in their right mind would pick up and eat the licked cookie or finish the project. In this session well talk about common forms of organizational dysfunction, and then facilitate a group discussion about working around, over, under or through organizational dysfunctions you've encountered.
Culture
Kellie Brownell, Sumana Harihareswara

* Keynote — Alex “Skud” Bayley

Keynote by Alex “Skud” Bayley
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Labor, ethics and computing

An exploration of labor and ethics from various points in the life of a computer -- from the day-to-day software programming and hardware inside the computer down to the materials used in various components. Includes the implications for open source hardware and software as well as possible future solutions.
Chemistry
Cameron Adamez

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

* Switching Teams: Moving an Application from MySQL to PostgreSQL

The true life story of switching database backends in our application.
Hacks
Julie Baumler

* The Perl Renaissance

The Perl Renaissance is in full swing. Join internationally acclaimed speaker and White Camel Award winner Paul Fenwick as we explore some of the most freakin' amazing developments in the land of Perl!
Chemistry
Paul Fenwick

* Training the trainers

This long session is a tutorial, with exercises, on how to run welcoming, effective outreach events targeted at bringing newcomers into your communities.
Cooking
Asheesh Laroia

* Unicode Best Practices

Developing applications to handle the natural languages and written scripts of the world—or even a small handful of them—is an impressively large task. Fortunately, Unicode provides tools to do just that. It’s more than just a character set, it’s a collection of standards for working with the world’s textual data. The problem is: Unicode itself is complex!
Cooking
Nova Patch