Julie Pagano's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* Behind Closed Doors: Managing Passwords in a Dangerous World

A modern application has a lot of passwords and keys floating around. Encryption keys, database passwords, and API credentials; often typed in to text files and forgotten. Fortunately a new wave of tools are emerging to help manage, update, and audit these secrets. Come learn how to avoid being the next TechCrunch headline.
Practice
Noah Kantrowitz

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp

* Creating a Third Wave of Free/Open Source Software

The free/open source software movement is over thirty years old, and has gone through a number of changes in that time, spawning projects large and small (including OpenConferenceWare, which runs this site!). If Free Software is the first generation, and Open Source is the second, current efforts toward creating an inclusive and sustainable world make up a third generation that we can start to form into a broader plan.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Exit Condition: when to ragequit, raise hell, or duck and cover

If you're caught in a job or a project where you simply can't convince your colleagues or organization to treat you with respect, it often feels like you're in a maze with no clear way out. (Un)fortunately, you're not alone. There's no universal solution to navigating a toxic or abusive workplace, but there's power in finding a theoretical context, sharing our stories, and learning from each other. Come learn about the options of voice, loyalty, and exit, and hear the stories of others who have had to make hard choices.
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Great Asana!

Bring your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips, aching back, and busy mind and explore how Yoga can help bring you relief, rest, and focus. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind. This class is accessible to all levels of ability.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Hardware Hula Hoops and Flow

In psychology flow is the honed in energized focus you get when performing tasks that are challenging that can be experienced in hula hooping and programming.
Hacks
Lindsey Bieda

* Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss

Like many young Muggles of the early 00's, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it's clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers -- I mean, wizards -- we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you'll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.
Culture
Lacey Williams Henschel

* Sustainable Career Development: Advancing While Still Having Free Time

In this talk, we'll examine the pressure in the tech industry to participate in work-related extracurriculars like side projects and meetups. We'll analyze where these expectations come from, what they're actually getting at, and talk about ideas for progressing in our careers without losing sight of the things in life that make us happy outside of work.
Culture
Noelle Daley

* Taking no for an answer

Open source (like many fields) rewards people who are confident and even a bit pushy. So we give talks encouraging folk to get over imposter syndrome, lean in, say yes to more things. But self-improvement shouldn't focus only on our most vulnerable members, but also our most powerful. So let's talk not about saying yes, but about hearing no. Learning to take no for an answer can transform efforts such as security, diversity and mentoring where we have few experts or volunteers and great need. Let's talk about accepting "defeat" with grace, and how to take "no" for an answer while still moving forwards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* The Rise of Emoji

Emoji is taking over the Web! We will look at how the phenomenon of Emoji has taken the Web by storm, explore how people are using Emoji on their favorite platforms and implications. We will also examine how these online platforms are benefiting from Emoji.
Culture
Alolita Sharma

* Towards an Ethics of Care: Understanding and Acknowledging Care Work in Technology Companies

This talk explores dimensions of care work and best practices for acknowledging and understanding care work in technology teams, and makes the business case for considering all involved with building and maintaining technologies in strategy and planning. I explore ways in which to track the hidden costs of care work, and build a discourse of sustainability and inclusion around care work in technology companies.
Business
Amelia Abreu

* Unraveling the Masculinization of Technology

Have you ever wondered where the perception that technology is a masculine pursuit comes from? Or why we have to explain that, "no really, women are interested in computers too"?
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Why you can't afford to miss out on junior developers

What if your next hire could make your team faster, help create a more inclusive and diverse environment, be easy to find, and be super excited to work with you? These people are not unicorns, they're junior developers. Most teams just don't know how to bring them on and get these benefits. Whether you're in a startup, consultancy, or a BigCo, with a few tips and processes, any team can learn how to grow new developers.
Practice
Bracken Mosbacker

Favorite proposals for this user

* Blurring the line between OSS communities: Devs, Vendors, Gov't and Users

Established OSS projects have complex communities that must (at least) try to work together. Presentation of my experience with OpenEMR's and other projects successes and failures and interact with the audience to share their own experiences.
Culture 2016-04-09 23:53:49 +0000
Tony McCormick

* Brainwaves, Bio-Data, and Diversity

Much of the interest in MindRider stemmed from Spencer Lowell's great photo in Wired UK. Since it came out, many people have sent me great comments, saying things along the lines of "Women represent!" or "POCs (People of Color) represent!" or "Filipinos represent!" This has meant a lot. Women and people of color are still underrepresented in both tech and cycling domains, and I've come to think of the MindRider photo, and the ensuing response, as a personal counterbalance to the aggressive, intolerant, exclusionary discourse that still plagues these domains, and especially plagues the startup sector that overlaps both. Some people call this "brogrammer talk." I've witnessed it in my time at MIT, and while I've noticed that most people don't talk or think this way, the loudness of the intolerant minority can have insidious, stressful effects on the rest of the community.
Culture 2016-04-14 00:44:27 +0000
Arlene Ducao

* Can Online Interaction Match some of the Magic of Face-to-Face Collaboration?

Join this interactive session connecting what we know about face-to-face collaboration and how and why it works with what online dialog, games, berry-picking, wayfinding and other large scale activities can accomplish.
Theory 2016-04-17 17:20:06 +0000
Carie Fox

* CSS Performance & What is the Browser doing?

Learn how the browser renders webpages, how to write better css, and how to monitor front end performance in Chrome.
Theory 2016-04-16 02:03:43 +0000
Sarah Etter

* Debugging Diversity

Despite the media attention given to the diversity in tech problem, many technology practitioners don't see how a lack of diversity affects their daily life. So, it is not surprising that they neither understand the magnitude of the problem nor how they can fix it. However, the principles and language of debugging, something technology practitioners understand well, can be used to help them understand diversity and their role in solving the problem. So, technologists already have a set of terms that they can use to tackle diversity. They just need to know how to apply those terms in order to effect positive change. These terms are expected behavior, tracing, refactoring, and sample code.
Culture 2016-03-16 19:25:11 +0000
Anjuan Simmons

* Designing and Writing Secure Software

Attackers only need to be right once, but developers have to be right all the time. Secure software development practices are essential.
Practice 2016-04-13 23:34:56 +0000
Aaron Jensen

* Domain-Driven Data

There are many types of open source databases and data analysis tools from which to choose today. Should you use a relational database? How about a key-value store? Maybe a document database? Or is a graph database the right fit for your project? What about polyglot persistence? Help!
Practice 2016-04-13 22:03:19 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Every Millisecond Counts: Performance & UX

This talk will look at how we can improve our users experience at any scale through performance optimizations at every layer of the stack, from backend to browser.
Theory 2016-03-19 21:24:48 +0000
Davey Shafik

* Explicit is Better Than Implicit: Setting Expectations

Miscommunication, wasted time, hurt feelings: real dangers when communicating with strangers online. As FOSS maintainers and contributors, let's try documenting our communication guidelines the same way we document our code style guidelines.
Culture 2016-04-05 01:48:19 +0000
Trey Hunner

* From Mobile First to Offline First

It's all too easy assume that your web or mobile app will run on a fast and reliable network with great coverage. The reality for your app's users, though, is often a slow and unreliable network with spotty coverage. What happens when the network doesn't work, or when the device is in airplane mode? You get unhappy, frustrated users. Building on the principles of mobile first, offline first is an approach to application design in which a web, mobile, desktop, or Internet of Things (IoT) application is built for offline usage first and is then progressively enhanced to take advantage of network connectivity when available.
Practice 2016-04-14 19:20:48 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Hackers & Hearthstone & Humanity

Sometimes the tech community can feel like it is without soul so Hackers & Hearthstone was created to focus on the cool things people are doing within the technology world.
Culture 2016-03-30 15:24:46 +0000
Lindsey Bieda

* How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Engineers: cross cultural clashes between Support and Engineering (and some ways to fix them)

It's possible to do Support work while knowing absolutely nothing about the underlying architecture. Support doesn't necessarily know why the product works, or even what language it's written in. It can be super tempting for an engineer to think that well, if these support people really had the competence and capacity to understand how the thing worked under the hood, then they'd be engineers and not mere support people, but that's a bad trap to fall into. Sometimes Support people are engineers in their own right, but a Support person with no computer science training can be an expert on the user interaction surfaces of the product and reproduce a result that has been baffling the engineers, even with no knowledge of the mechanism by which the bug is happening. It's helpful to give Support enough information about the architecture to have a better starting point for asking the user for details and trying approaches to replicate the problem. It can be tempting for Support to think that any given member of Engineering understands the entire breadth, depth, complexity, and interconnectedness of the entire product simultaneously at any given time, but this is a trap! A good amount of time Engineering has no clue in the slightest about what is going on in another branch of the product, and in a sufficiently complex codebase, there can be millions of lines of code that a single particular engineer has never touched or even heard of. Or it's been long enough since they worked on that part of it that they would have to take several hours of very hard study in order to figure out what's going on. In particular, sometimes in a bug report, Engineering can say "Okay, I see what *part* of the code the user is causing to fire, but I haven't the FOGGIEST idea how the customer actually got that to happen." It's very important for Support to list out every single step (even the ones that seem obvious) that leads to the error occurring.
Culture 2016-04-14 06:31:31 +0000
Azure Lunatic

* How I unexpectedly built a monster of an open source project

In 2009, Oh My Zsh was released. It's since become a popular open source tool used by developers around the world. Let's walk through how a really small idea turned into a big project.
Culture 2016-04-11 22:17:44 +0000
Robby Russell

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:14:34 +0000
Ed Finkler

* In the Trenches of Open Source Culture: The Node.js Inclusivity Working Group

The goal of this working group strikes deep at the heart of problems in open source software. We hear the stories of contentious and dramatic flare-ups, but not the day to day work people do to make things better. Come learn what it's like and what it takes to make a difference in OSS culture.
Culture 2016-04-16 02:04:52 +0000
Bryan Hughes

* Learning HTTP

HTTP is the fabric of the web and the growing API economy. Whether you're building a backend or a frontend application, creating an API, or consuming an API, it’s helpful to understand the basics of HTTP. Topics covered will include HTTP methods, request headers, request URIs, response status codes, response headers, resource representations, authentication, content negotiation, and caching.
Theory 2016-04-14 19:32:46 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Lossless Emoji - Doing Emoji Right

Learn how difficult it can be to do emoji right and what you can do to preserve the message and emotions of your users. If you take user input, you owe it to the internet to attend this talk.
Practice 2016-04-13 07:21:09 +0000
Ryan Kennedy

* Machine Ethics and Emerging Technologies

An autonomous car is driving down a single-lane road carved out of a cliff. Unexpectedly, a child runs in front the car chasing a ball, and trips. The car cannot stop in time to avoid a fatal collision, but it can sacrifice itself and its passenger by driving off the cliff. Should it? And if so, would you buy such a car?
Theory 2016-04-14 07:32:44 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Peeking into Ruby: Tracing Running Code

Your Ruby app is in production, but something isn’t quite right. It worked locally, it passed CI… why’s the running app acting weird?
Practice 2016-04-07 16:46:30 +0000
Jason Clark

* Software Patents After Alice: A Long and Sad Tail

The Supreme Court's ruling in the landmark Alice vs. CLS Bank case has finally given the lower courts some tools they could use to overturn obvious and vague patents, particularly frivolous patents on software. But we haven't won, because bogus patent suits are still being filed. This talk is for anyone who is wondering what the recent decisions mean for small and mid-size entities, how international treaties can impact local policy and what can be done to improve the situation.
Business 2016-04-13 17:05:45 +0000
Deb Nicholson

* Testing - Best Practices in Open Souce World

1. How to contribute in improving quality of open source software 2. Get inspiration how to create test harness for your application 3. How to alter your software development model to produce bug-free code. 4. Altering your development model to match SW quality standards. 5. Study the technology, know the feature well and use your experience 6. Know the point when it is time to report a bug 7. How to troubleshoot the issues.
Practice 2016-04-01 09:56:30 +0000
Amita Sharma

* The High Barrier to Entry in Tech for the Underpriviliged

When you are trying to transition into tech, it helps to be part of an open source community that welcomes people from all types of backgrounds and experience-levels. If you are a beginner programmer and underprivileged, the search for the right tech community can be a daunting experience. You may be systematically excluded from participating in some communities by gatekeepers. As a programmer who comes from a marginalised community, allow me to share with you the story of how I found a programming community that welcomed and helped me to overcome the high barrier to entry in tech. This talk aims to encourage everyone to do their bit to create inviting communities for the underprivileged.
Culture 2016-04-08 23:02:52 +0000
Khalid A

* The Wikipedia Asian Month: how we collaborated our way to one of the biggest online Wikipedia edit-a-thons ever

In November 2015, Wikimedia communities across Asia and the world set off on what would become one of the biggest online Wikipedia edit-a-thons ever: the Wikipedia Asian Month (WAM). Managing such a huge project though, especially with people from all over the world participating, is a big challenge. This presentation looks at how we did it, what we're doing now, and how your collaboration, online project or community can benefit from our experiences.
Practice 2016-04-13 09:19:30 +0000
Josh Lim

* Transpreneur: Tales of a FTM Transgender Entrepreneur

The primary reason I was able to make career pivots at Intel was due to my connections to the Women at Intel network. Through this network I was referred to career counselors, business contacts, and the technical experts I needed to move my career ahead. As an FTM, my inbox is still filled with opportunities from women in tech groups, but now when I see these emails I wonder if I will be welcomed or not. A recent email I received said specifically "if you are female please attend." As a person who now identifies as male, I find that my connection to the community that supported me for the entirety of my career is now becoming tenuous.
Culture 2016-04-14 15:35:59 +0000
Sev Leonard

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* "A huge green fierce snake bars the way!"; or, Building a Text Adventure Game in Python

Have you ever wanted to vanquish a dragon with your bare hands? First step is making a world where you can. In this talk, I'll give you the blueprints for my Python text adventure engine, as well as some recipes for making things in a text-only world.
Cooking
Katie Silverio

* Bringing Security to Your Open Source Project

With high profile breaches in open source projects, the issue of security has become one of great import to many people. But many projects, especially smaller ones, are intimidated by the idea of a security audit. This talk will discuss ways for smaller projects to experiment, learn, and even have fun improving their security. No PhDs in security required!
Culture
Terri Oda

* Care and Feeding of a Healthy Job Hunt

A job hunt can be a demoralizing and dehumanizing process, but there are a lot of things which you can do to make it more productive and less stressful.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Dog Food is for Dogs: Escape the Crate of Your Perspective with User Research

Dogfooding—using your own products—is nice, but is it sufficient to produce good design for people who aren’t you? Our familiarity with our projects and their quirks makes us poor substitutes for users in the wild. So just who are these users, and how do you incorporate them into design and development? In this workshop, we'll explore user experience design and research strategies that will help you design for people who aren’t you.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan, amelia abreu

* From the Unicorn’s Mouth: Stories of Managing Multiple Diverse Identities in Tech

We each have many critical facets to our identity-- race, gender, sexuality, class, health, and family background are just a handful of examples-- and the interaction between them can shape our lives more than any one factor alone. In this panel discussion, learn about intersectionality, and what the experiences of those living at the crossroads of different minority identities can teach us about what it takes to create a truly inclusive open source community.
Culture
Megan Baker, Thalida Noel, Nichole Burton, Lisa Sy

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Business
Ed Finkler

* How you tell the story matters: telling better stories and making better technologies

What happens when we tell stories? How do we tell stories about the technology we build, why do some stories get told over others? How do we talk about our successes, and how do we not talk about our failures? Whose stories get heard: how do women, people of color, disabled people, and “non-technical” workers get left out of the stories we hear? In this talk, I'll explore the role of storytelling in technology, and share what I've found about telling better stories.
Business
amelia abreu

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Removing Barriers: Ascend Project Post Mortem

Last year the Ascend Project was announced, then in the fall the first pilot took place in Portland. This year we'll report back on how it went, hear from participants, and break down what worked and what could be changed for future versions of this type of program. You'll definitely come away with some ideas for your next learning event, code school, or sponsored training.
Hacks
Lukas Blakk, Kronda Adair

* Software Archeology and The Code Of Doom

You approach the legacy codebase with trepidation. If the vine-draped entrance and collapsing roof weren't enough warning, traces of previous explorers before you lie scattered about, caught in bizarre traps and oubliettes. What next, snakes?!
Chemistry
Kerri Miller

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Teaching and managing for technologists

After 15 years or so working as a programmer I made two big changes in my job: first I became a manager, then I started working with college students to help them learn to code. This is a personal story of why that has been some of the most challenging and rewarding work I've ever done.
Culture
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Universal Web Design: How to create an awesome experience for *every* user

In this talk, I will describe how Universal Web Design principles can be easily applied to new or existing sites, how these principles will improve your users’ experience, and how Universal Web Design will save you time and money.
Culture
David Newton

* User Research For Non-Researchers

User research doesn't have to be time-consuming, elaborate, or performed by a UX professional. If you're willing to talk to a few strangers, you can do user research. In this presentation, I'll talk about how to do lightweight research on any product or topic, no matter what your background and training are. I'll focus on the most effective tools for quick research, and some of the common pitfalls for novice researchers.
Cooking
Jane Davis

* Your Job is Political: Tech Money in Politics

As much as the personal is political, the old-fashioned political still is too, and companies and individuals made rich by the tech industry and by open source software have been making increasingly direct monetary incursions into U.S. politics. Let's take a look at what policies & politicians our bosses, investors, users and contributors are buying at the local and state levels, with a specific focus on current changes in education policy and future moves in law enforcement.
Business
Kelsey Gilmore-Innis

Favorite proposals for this user

* Bringing Open Source to the Federal Government

The story of how one federal agency decided to start living open source principles, built great tools, and attracted great developer talent.
Culture 2015-02-06 17:08:49 +0000
Bruce Arthur

* Success is Bigger Than Not Failing: A passionate plea for criteria

We talk a lot about minimum viable products, and building our products up from small features. We talk a lot about failure, and how to learn from it and not replicate failures over and over again. But what I haven’t heard a lot of discussion about is how we know we’ve succeeded. Is it market share? Usable product? Could understanding and setting a measurable, achievable goals help us overcome imposter syndrome, second sock syndrome, and feature creep?
Hacks 2015-02-25 06:25:24 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* The Psychology of Open Communities

Open source software may be made of ones and zeroes, but open source communities are made of people. This talk is a whirlwind tour of what research psychology has to tell us about how individuals and groups learn, falter, and grow. The talk will emphasize "takeaways" - ways for you to use this research to improve your communities and your experiences in them.
Culture 2015-03-04 22:52:09 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Three Bug Stories

Learn to write better code by hearing interesting ways that code has gone wrong!
Cooking 2015-03-08 03:29:05 +0000
Moss Collum

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* A short examination on the intersection of security and usability (or How usable security could save us all)

This talk is geared for people with minimal experience with usability and some experience with security
Chemistry
Morgan Miller

* Beyond Leaning In: How to Negotiate to Get What You Want

Now that you know how important it is to ask for want you want, come learn how to negotiate in a way that will get you what you need. For everyone of any gender identity who works at a company or freelances, who feels like a newb or an expert, this presentation will teach you effective, practical skills to improve your negotiations and deal confidently with conflicts.
Business
Katie Lane

* Civilizing IRC and forums: moderation strategies for mutual respect

As a project's public IRC channel or forum grows, it's hard to keep it friendly. People get frustrated with each other, people have "different" senses of humor, disagreements escalate...oh goodness, it can be a mess. This isn't great for retaining community members or welcoming new ones. I'll share my strategies for dealing with problems, learned at the scale of hundreds of forum threads, tens of thousands of forum visitors, and dozens of IRC chatters every day.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor

* Data, Privacy, & Trust in Open Source: 10 Lessons from Wikipedia

Few people today are not concerned with the way data is used to enhance or subvert individual privacy. This is especially true on the Web, where open source technologies are behind much of what we interact with and use on a daily basis. As the most fundamental aspects of our lives become networked -- social relationships, work, finance, and even how we get our food -- how can we make sure that open source technologies foster a sense of trust with users, protect their privacy, and still give data scientists the tools they need to gain insight?
Culture
Steven Walling

* Deconstructing Open Source Contributions

Everyone wants to make contributing to open source projects more accessible and fun. But how do we do that? One way is to analyze past contributions to identify potential obstacles and opportunities for intervention and support. This workshop will use our own experiences as contributors to explore how the process works, using a simple but effective reflective activity.
Culture
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Forking Pop Culture and Remixing Code: Where Open Movements Intersect

Creative open culture communities operate in many of the same ways as open source communities and share many of the same principles. How are fan writers like open source contributors? What can hackers learn from remixers (and vice versa)? And what happens when creative communities start building open source projects to support their own work?
Culture
Nancy McLaughlin

* Hacking In-Group Bias for Fun and Profit

Our lives and social interactions are governed by sociology and psychology. As geeks, we strive to understand how the technology around us works, and we strive to find ways to make it better. Society is basically one big, complex piece of technology, and, like all technology, it is hackable. This talk will explain how you can do that.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Hold on to Your Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* How to Run 100 User Tests in Two Days

Have you ever dreamed of running a vast quantity of user tests in a very short amount of time? Let me show you how I pulled this off at two conferences.
Hacks
Daniel Sauble

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Knitting for programmers

Yeah, you've seen us knitting during talks. I promise we're paying more attention than the people with their laptops open. Well, now learn how we do what we do... the programmer way. I'll start with the topology of individual stitches and go through geometry to design patterns, and by the end of it you'll know how to knit a sweater.
Hacks
Alex Bayley

* Lightning Talk Workshop

Heard of lightning talks but never considered giving one? Never fear, lightning talks are easy! During this session, you'll write and practice your first lightning talk.
Cooking
Michelle Rowley

* Making your mobile web app accessible

Accessibility - It's important. Learn how to make your mobile web app accessible to everyone.
Cooking
Eitan Isaacson

* My Journey into Open Source Design

Becoming a contributing designer on an open source project is often tougher than contributing code. The pathways to designing for open source projects are often unclear. Using my own experience joining the WordPress project, I'll share how I think open source projects can make it easier for designers to contribute their skills.
Cooking
Mel Choyce

* Open Lighting Architecture: Blinky Lights!

Target audience will anyone with a interest into doing atypical stuff with SoC platforms including professional and hobbyist level implementations. Even if it's a simple XMAS light display, complex LED panel setup, or even driving consumer products like Hue lights.
Cooking
Matt Ranostay

* Open Sourcing Mental Illness: Ending The Stigma

An open, honest discussion of mental illness from the perspective of a web developer. We can learn to survive, cope, and thrive.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Patents are for babies: what every engineer should know about IP law

Don't leave IP law to the lawyers! Intellectual property law is a minefield wrapped in straightjacket sprinkled with arsenic-laced gumdrops. Invented for lawyers by lawyers, IP law makes many engineers resentful and dismissive. And yet most of us don't know enough about the details to protect ourselves and our own creations. This session will increase your understanding of how copyrights, patents, trademarks, trade secrets, and open source licensing protect you, your code, your company, and your community.
Business
Belinda Runkle

* Slytherin 101: How To Win Friends and Influence People

Do you wish that you were better at getting people to do what you need them to do? Do you keep getting put in charge of things and then get stuck wondering how the heck you're supposed to get things done? Do you keep getting into conflicts with other people because of stuff you've said, and you aren't entirely sure why? Fortunately, Slytherin House has you covered. Come to this talk and learn the basics of how to hack human relationships, using the tools of cunning and ambition to achieve inter-House harmony. As long as you promise not to use these techniques to support the next Dark Lord, of course.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Speaker Support of Awesomeness: How I went from stage fright to stage presence and want to help others do the same.

Once upon a time, I was terrified of public speaking. I went from having stage fright to being a stage presence who speaks at conferences. I run a support group for old and new speakers called the "Tech Conf Speaker Support of Awesomeness." I want to talk about what we do, why we do it, and how well it's worked out so far. This talk is about speaking for the first time, improving your talks, and how conference organizers and attendees can help too.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Stop Crying in the Bathroom and Start Your Own Business

The tech industry has a 'diversity problem' and companies are courting women, people of color and other marginalized people as the pressure mounts to hire someone besides 24-year-old cis, straight white male programmers. However, for many marginalized people, working in startups, agencies, and large tech companies can be a miserable, demoralizing experience that literally results in crying in the bathroom. There's more to life than startups. Come hear ideas for making your own path in the tech industry, without compromising your dignity or your mental health.
Business
Kronda Adair

* Tales from the Trenches: Battling Browser Bugs for "Fun" and (Non-)Profit

Web development used to be HARD. You basically had to rewrite your code for every new browser you wanted to support. But with modern browsers and libraries like jQuery, those dark days are over. Or are they? We pushed the limits of what the web can do while building VisualEditor (the new editor for Wikipedia) and found plenty of hilarious, insane, amazing and horrifying bugs in browsers even in 2014. All we needed to do was poke around in some unusual places.
Hacks
Roan Kattouw

* The Case for Junior Developers

Are you passionate about building tech, but think there is no place in your organization for junior developers? Come explore the true costs and benefits of hiring junior developers and see how you can improve your company while helping juniors become the best developers they can be.
Culture
Shawna Scott

* The Keys to Working Remotely

When I tell people I work from home, they tend to assume I spend the day playing with my dog outside. It's beyond comprehension to most that I actually spend as much time working as they do, sometimes more. I hope to enlighten those close-minded people about the possibilities working from home offers and how to do it well. Session slides: http://www.carsonshold.com/talks/keys-to-working-remotely/
Culture
Carson Shold

* The Outreach Program for Women: what works & what's next

We've mentored and interned in the Outreach Program for Women, and we know it works -- it improves the gender balance inside open source communities. We'll discuss why it works, how it builds off of Google Summer of Code, and discuss replicating it, expanding it, and looking at the next step in the recruiting and inclusion pipeline.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Liz Henry

* Towards more diversity-friendly social networks

How can we make social networks more "diversity-friendly"? It starts with an anti-oppression attitude, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and includes the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments, and will include an annotated collection of resources on the wiki.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Deborah Pierce

* Unicorns Are People, Too: Re-Thinking Soft and Hard Skills

As developers, we tend to value hard skills that can be quantified or measured objectively. Job postings search for unicorns, but we are people first and foremost and being human isn't as easy as programming. While the code comes easily, the soft skills that make us human are complicated and difficult to get right. This talk will explore the danger of neglecting so-called "soft" skills, what we stand to lose by overvaluing technical skills, and alternatives to the hard and soft dichotomy.
Culture
Liz Abinante

* Vim Your Way

You’ve learned to do things Vim’s way; now it’s time for Vim to learn to do things your way. We'll learn more about customizing Vim to fit your needs and workflow.
Cooking
Emily St.

* When Many Eyes Fail You: Tales from Security Standards and Open Source

It's often said that "given many eyes, all bugs are shallow" and open source proponents love to list this as a reason that open source is more secure than its closed-source relatives. While that makes a nice sound bite, the reality of security with many eyeballs doesn't fit so nicely into a tweet. This talk will explore some of the things that surprised me in going from academic security research to industry security research in open source and open standards.
Culture
Terri Oda

Favorite proposals for this user

* Accessibility Evangelism for the Non-Specialist

So, you probably know why accessibility is important already (and if you don't we can talk about that a little too!). Maybe your blind friend uses your app, or you're super passionate about W3C standards. But you're having a hard time getting that idea across to the other people working on your project. How do you motivate people to work on accessibility, and change the perception that it's hard and obscure? This talk will draw from the toolboxes of accessibility evangelists and community managers. We'll discuss a range of strategies to help contributors understand the value of accessibility, and help you incentivize contributions in this area.
Culture 2014-04-11 03:04:28 +0000
Katherine Mancuso

* Apprenticeships: I implore you!

Talk Outline: My background pre-programming Attending gSchool (6 month Ruby on Rails program), hired as an apprentice Why we need apprenticeships What senior developers and teams get out of apprenticeships What you can do / My suggestions for working with apprentices
Culture 2014-03-12 20:14:09 +0000
Jennifer Eliuk

* Clueless to Collaborator on a Github Open Source Project

Even if you have development chops, learning git and open source culture can be confusing and intimidating. Or maybe you're an experienced open-sourcer looking to gain insight as to how to get more people involved. Either way, come hear the tale of a knowledgeable fool's journey to becoming a collaborator on Ractive.js.
Culture 2014-04-05 06:27:50 +0000
Marty Nelson

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture 2014-04-04 16:50:29 +0000
Kat Toomajian

* Open Infrastructure for an Open Company

Balanced is opening its infrastructure to the community, learn how and why.
Business 2014-04-05 03:28:45 +0000
Noah Kantrowitz

* Open Source for n00bs: Creating a well known and useful personal OSS project

Based on my personal experience, the idea is to make a quick introduction of how with a project in mind, you can get an OS project that's known, where people participate and which adds value to everyone.
Cooking 2014-04-01 06:45:01 +0000
Martin Gontovnikas

* Programming in the Small - Teaching my 5 Year Old Ruby

My children are growing up in an age of devices, phones and tablets, that hide so much of the underlying machine. Come with me on my journey to teach my daughter how computers really work, using Ruby and a love for drawing and games as our guides.
Culture 2014-04-02 23:05:10 +0000
Jason Clark

* The Coder as Artist: Painting with Pixels and Numbers

Popular culture would have us believe that programming and art are polar opposites. In reality, code is just another medium with which we are creating art every day. Learn how embracing code as our art and artists as our community will help us create a more beautiful and accessible world.
Culture 2014-04-05 05:06:15 +0000
Shawna Scott

* Web Design is a Process

Nobody puts IA in a corner! Web design and development does not start with Photoshop or end with a commit. It is all the stuff in between that matters. Get ready to get your hands dirty in this workshop exploring all the facets that make up the field of "web design".
Business 2014-04-05 02:22:54 +0000
Morten Rand-Hendriksen