Colin Dabritz's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013 Birds of a Feather

Favorite proposals for this user

* Ruby Beginners Meetup (Confirmed)

Informal meetup targeted at newcomers to Ruby. Bring questions. Drink $beverage. Hack. Experienced Rubyists welcome; we want you to share your expertise!
BOF 2013-05-20 23:56:36 +0000
Kirsten Comandich

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* Custom Markup for Working and Writing

We show how both doing work and writing about work are enhanced by special purpose markup hosted by federated wiki plugins.
Hacks
Ward Cunningham

* Dirty Tricks of Computer Hardware: What You Don't Know Will (Probably Not) Kill You

Ever wonder what you don't know about how your computer hardware really works? Do you tire of lying to your relatives that "gremlins" are the cause of intermittent data loss and blue screens, and not just a car from the 1970s? Let's take a journey into the wonderful world of wonky hardware and find out what can be done about it!
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* DIY: Creativity and Open Source

Panelists will discuss their uses of open source tools in creative applications, from design to art to hardware.
Culture
Melissa Chavez, Sarah Sharp, Cloë Latchkey, Cameron Adamez

* Expanding Your Empathy

I believe empathy is the core competency that is missing from much of the efforts to push the tech community in a direction towards more diversity of all kinds. Companies, communities and conferences cannot expect everything to magically change until they're willing to go deep and examine the systemic patterns and structures that keep underrepresented communities from feeling safe and welcome in the tech space.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Hacking the academic experience

When I was asked to teach Ruby on Rails at Columbia University I observed that a significant number of the skills required to become a successful professional in the industry are acquired on the job and aren’t being taught in school.
Culture
Emily Stolfo

* How My Kids Are Learning to Program By Talking

My children have patiently tolerated a number of teach-STEM-quick schemes their dad has brought home. They've taught robots to dance, created simple animations using Scratch, and, quite frankly, made a lot of poop jokes. What's missing from these programming tools was storytelling. The ones we tried focused either on easy interactivity or expressive power. If only there were a way to combine the two... oh, wait, there was—46 years ago!
Culture
Ian Dees

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Labor, ethics and computing

An exploration of labor and ethics from various points in the life of a computer -- from the day-to-day software programming and hardware inside the computer down to the materials used in various components. Includes the implications for open source hardware and software as well as possible future solutions.
Chemistry
Cameron Adamez

* Literate Programming for the 21st Century

Knuth advocated writing programs for people, not computers. How does crafting code with literate programming play with quick iterative development? Example heavy session using org-mode's Babel project and progrmming languages with succinct syntax, like Scala and Clojure.
Cooking
Howard Abrams

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Product Management in the Open (Source) - community and direction

Product Management is a generally well defined discipline inside large corporate organizations. But how does it work in the open source world? Do we need it? How does product consensus happen in open source?
Business
Larissa Shapiro

* Programming Is Debugging, So Debug Better

Debugging: The schedule destroyer, the confidence sapper, the mire in which thousands of working hours are lost every day. It's time to stop staring at those four lines of code, desperately willing the bug to appear. This session is about the philosophies that will steer you around bugs, strategies for dealing with them, and tools that can shorten a four-hour debugging session to five minutes.
Cooking
Yoz Grahame

* Remote Pair Programming

Remote Pair Programming: my setup, some advice, and a live demo^H^H stress test
Cooking
Sam Livingston-Gray

* Running with Scissors: Open Source Team Dynamics

Team dynamics are tricky. They're different when you're volunteering your time, when you're working for someone, or when you're trying to build something and invite someone else to build other good things too.
Culture
Amye Scavarda

* Shall We Play A Game?

In just 1.5 hours, I will help you craft a computer game AI that will consistently beat you and your friends.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Simple Questions Should Have Simple Answers

What happens when a project begins to embrace the philosophy that simple questions should have simple answers? Q: Simple to whom? A: Simple to the person asking the question. "Simple questions should have simple answers" has given me a lot of design clarity in my projects. I hope to convince you of its beneficial effects.
Culture
Michael Schwern

* The "Oh Shit" Graph: What We Can Learn From Wikipedia's Editor Decline Trend

Wikipedia and the other Wikimedia projects have been hemorrhaging editors for the past five years. We're going to talk about the reasons why, how they can affect other projects, and what you can do to prevent it in yours.
Chemistry
Brandon Harris

* The Future of Ruby

What will Ruby, the programming language and community, look like in 2 years?
Culture
Brian Shirai

* Training the trainers

This long session is a tutorial, with exercises, on how to run welcoming, effective outreach events targeted at bringing newcomers into your communities.
Cooking
Asheesh Laroia

* Wikipedia's new editing system, and how you can use it too

Learn about Wikimedia's new OSS Javascript visual editor for HTML, how it works and how you can use it in your Web projects
Chemistry
Trevor Parscal, Roan Kattouw