Josh Cronemeyer's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2009 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Code-n-Splode BOF

BOF to go with the "My Grand Experiment" Talk. http://opensourcebridge.org/sessions/115
BoF
gabrielle roth

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* Become a better programmer by bridging Ousterhout's Dichotomy

Do you know a dynamic/scripting language like Ruby or Python, but you don't know C? Diving down just a little can make you a better programmer in your preferred language! Scripting languages can teach old C hands a thing or two, too. Delve into the benefits of being a multilingual programmer.
Cooking
Andy Grover

* Deploying to the Edge from CouchDB

CouchDB can serve standalone applications, which can be shared amongst users, putting the source code (and control) back in their hands.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Get Off Your Asana and Move!

This is a yoga workshop for anyone who sits and works on computers a lot. You will learn breathing exercises and physical postures that can be done at anytime to help maintain a healthy body and clear mind. Suggestions will be included for how to modify stretches to protect injuries and provide gentle opening.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Introduction to Lift

Build real-time interactive applications using the Lift Web Framework
Cooking
David Pollak

* My Grand Experiment: A Portland Women-focused Tech Group.

The idea for Code-n-Splode grew out of the Women in Open Source BOF at OSCON 2007. I'll talk about my original reasons for starting a women-friendly tech group, how the group is evolving, and what I've learned.
Culture
gabrielle roth

* New Ways for Teaching Children Software Programming

Software programming has come a long way for students and younger children since the days of Logo. Syntax has been replaced with connecting blocks and the triangle turtle has been replaced with custom artwork children create themselves. Now, multi-threading and event processing are easier to teach children than functions, and this session discusses these ideas as well as so the edge of kid code.
Culture
Howard Abrams

* Python for Teachers

Bring your laptop with Python installed and follow along as we go through examples from a 21st century high school mathematics curriculum, such as we're currently prototyping and implementing in niche markets.
Culture
Kirby Urner

* Re-factor Your Brain: Meditation for Geeks

Meditation is the ultimate open source tool. You can do it anywhere and it’s free. It requires only your brain and your body. It’s positive effects are numerous, including increased productivity, better problem-solving and a reduction in overall stress. Learn about long-term effects of mediation on the brain, some meditation techniques and how mediation can help you do your job better.
Culture
Christie Koehler

* RubySpec: What does my Ruby do?

RubySpec is a project to write a complete, executable specification for the Ruby programming language. If organizing Ruby programmers is akin to herding cats, imagine what it's like to organize Ruby language implementers. We will talk about the history of RubySpec, how it works, challenges along the way, and the current status.
Hacks
Brian Ford

* Scala for recovering Java developers

Scala is a functional/object-oriented hybrid language that runs on the JVM or the CLR. Scala is fully compatible with Java and brings many powerful features to the JVM, features such as: the ability to easily create DSL's due to Scala's ability to define methods for most operators, easily target multi-core hardware as Scala's types are immutable by default, access to the Actor based concurrency model, and expressive and concise code due to Scala's type inference and expressive syntax. All this without much of the boilerplate and cruft code that is so common in Java.
Cooking
Shawn Spooner

* Spindle, Mutilate and Metaprogram: How far _can_ you push it before there be dragons?

Maybe the edge isn’t as close as we thought it was. Maybe you can do some really funky things with your language without accidentally summoning eldritch spirits. Or maybe not. The only way to find out is to try it—or, if you are of the more prudent proclivities, to watch someone else try it.
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

* The Linux Kernel Development model

How the Linux kernel development model works.
Chemistry
Greg Kroah-Hartman

* Thursday Keynotes

Featuring Mayor Sam Adams and Ward Cunningham
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Ward Cunningham

* Ubiquitous Angels

We're using a variety of gems to build an ambient sensing tool to watch user activity over urban environments. The acts_as_solr gem to help provide faceted search, carrot2 to perform clustering and topic analysis, the twitter gem to fetch user activity in the first place.
Hacks
Anselm Hook

* Unit Test Your Database!

Given that the database, as the canonical repository of data, is the most important part of many applications, why is it that we don't write database unit tests? This talk promotes the practice of implementing tests to directly test the schema, storage, and functionality of databases.
Cooking
David Wheeler

* Wednesday Welcome and Keynotes

Featuring Amber Case, Cyborg Anthropologist, and Kurt von Finck of Monty Program AB.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Amber Case, Kurt von Finck

* Your Shell History In The Cloud

Use Google App Engine to harness a lifetime of shell history from any computer with tagging, searching and annotations.
Hacks
Josh Cronemeyer