Nova Patch's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* Accessible By Default

Making your website accessible for users with disabilities isn’t flashy, but it’s necessary. Websites built for universal access benefit all users, not just users with a disability. They’re also more SEO friendly, and are generally built to be more user friendly. From generating increased revenue, to providing better access to services, the benefits of developing accessible websites are real and measurable.
Practice
Kendra Skeene

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Besides, great mentors are critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Hard Problems in Terms of Service Enforcement

When you run an online service, you always hope you won't have to deal with abuse. But it's inevitable, and many situations aren't clear-cut as you might wish. Some examples of abuse are obvious, but this talk explores the grey areas and messy questions: what content should you consider a violation of your Terms of Service, and how do you handle it when it's reported to you?
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* More Than Binary: Inclusive Gender Collection and You

Many people identify their gender in many ways. So why do we build systems to capture accurate gender information with a dropdown that only lists “male” and “female”? This talk covers why you might want to consider alternative ways of selecting gender for your users, a brief overview of the current best practices, the case study of the decisions I made when creating my open source project Gender Amender (a library you can help work on right now!), and why more work needs to be done. I'd also like to facilitate a short discussion during the time slot, so that we can share varied perspectives on how to improve the entire process of gender collection, and articulate the lenses through which we can and should view gender (e.g. “what are some other data structures we could use to capture gender identity information?”).
Practice
Anne DeCusatis

* The Rise of Emoji

Emoji is taking over the Web! We will look at how the phenomenon of Emoji has taken the Web by storm, explore how people are using Emoji on their favorite platforms and implications. We will also examine how these online platforms are benefiting from Emoji.
Culture
Alolita Sharma

* Unraveling the Masculinization of Technology

Have you ever wondered where the perception that technology is a masculine pursuit comes from? Or why we have to explain that, "no really, women are interested in computers too"?
Culture
Audrey Eschright

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Developer's-Eye View of API Client Libraries

A developer's experience of an API and its client libraries can make the difference between them building on a project and giving up in frustration. If you develop an API client library, you'll learn what you can do to get it out of the way so developers can spend mental energy on putting together exciting projects, not fighting with tools. If you work with web APIs, you'll learn about factors to consider when you're choosing a framework to use. Either way, you'll learn about best practices--code-related and not--that make the difference between fun and easy development and a frustrating slog.
Cooking
Frances Hocutt

* A Matter of Time

Did you know that every so often, a minute lasts 61 seconds? If that sounds like something that might break some software, you'd be right! In this talk, we'll discuss the common ways that time is implemented in a number of libraries you probably depend on, how these representations can fall short of giving us a complete picture of what time it is, and what we can do about this state of affairs.
Chemistry
John Feminella

* Building a self learning word prediction and auto-correct module for FirefoxOS and openweb handling multilingual input

Language input for mobile devices has always been a challenge on how to provide intuitive experience along with the easy of type. One approach towards that end is predictive text input. But predictions are as good as the wordlist that it gets generated from. Often it becomes a much harder problem to implement the same approach for localized languages like Hindi,Bengali (India, Bangladesh) and languages that require IME to type effectively. One approach is to learn from users typing preference and improve the dictionary weight-age to improve prediction. This talk will discuss upon how this can be implemented in Firefox OS and how the same approach can be used for openweb apps universally without locking in to any specific language. We also will briefly discuss how it manages to improve localized language predictions and the challenges some transliteration system faces along with how we can tackle them.
Hacks
Rabimba Karanjai

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Desigining for Renaming

Renaming yourself is never easy. In Santa Clara County in the State of California, to file a petition to change one's name costs over $400, and may take six months or more. Then one must change one's name (and possibly one's gender marker) on the dozens of sites and services one uses. On many sites, that's easy, I go to preferences and edit my name. But then the site addresses me as "Mr. Emma Humphries," oh really? Other systems will correctly greet me as "Emma" when I log in. But still call me by $DEAD_NAME when they send an email. This brings us to the first best practice: When I change my name in one place, change it in all the places.
Culture
Emma Humphries

* Dog Food is for Dogs: Escape the Crate of Your Perspective with User Research

Dogfooding—using your own products—is nice, but is it sufficient to produce good design for people who aren’t you? Our familiarity with our projects and their quirks makes us poor substitutes for users in the wild. So just who are these users, and how do you incorporate them into design and development? In this workshop, we'll explore user experience design and research strategies that will help you design for people who aren’t you.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan, amelia abreu

* Escapology: multilingual ContentEditable rich text editing

VisualEditor, Wikimedia's rich text editor, extends and normalizes browser contenteditable behaviour from Javascript. To work well for all languages, it must satisfy a seemingly impossible set of constraints. This is the story of how we managed.
Hacks
David Chan

* For Love and For Money

Let’s talk about the work we want to do, the work we have to do, and how we might create systems that don’t continue to force bad choices between building community, technical work, and diversity activism.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* From the Unicorn’s Mouth: Stories of Managing Multiple Diverse Identities in Tech

We each have many critical facets to our identity-- race, gender, sexuality, class, health, and family background are just a handful of examples-- and the interaction between them can shape our lives more than any one factor alone. In this panel discussion, learn about intersectionality, and what the experiences of those living at the crossroads of different minority identities can teach us about what it takes to create a truly inclusive open source community.
Culture
Megan Baker, Thalida Noel, Nichole Burton, Lisa Sy

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal and social identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Introduction to data munging with pandas and IPython Notebook

This talk will go over importing, exploring, and exporting your data, and common issues you may encounter.
Cooking
Meli Lewis

* Male/Female/Othered: Implementing Gender-Inclusiveness in User Data Collection

You want to gather information about your users that you can use to improve their experience and yours. They want their identities to be acknowledged and treated with respect. This talk is about meeting both needs: How to ask about gender in ways that welcome the diversity of reality while still being able to analyze the data you get back. We'll discuss the nature of that challenge, how some major websites address it, and example solutions for different scenarios.
Culture
Finn Ellis, Jonathan Harker

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Open Source Tools for Scientific Research

Come learn about open science and the tools available for modern scientific research.
Chemistry
Amy Boyle

* Opening Up The Current Open Source Blueprint

Accessibility, diversity, and open source holding itself accountable to its own standards of what it means to be an open community.
Culture
Stephanie Morillo

* Probably

If you want to understand probability better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* So how do you reach every person on the planet: Internationalization at Twitter

Twitter is the world’s most popular platform which enables users to create and share ideas and information instantly, without barriers. In order to fulfill this mission, it has to provide language support for every person seamlessly. This talk will walk through Twitter’s open source language libraries, internationalization and localization standards and technologies.
Chemistry
Alolita Sharma

* Teaching and managing for technologists

After 15 years or so working as a programmer I made two big changes in my job: first I became a manager, then I started working with college students to help them learn to code. This is a personal story of why that has been some of the most challenging and rewarding work I've ever done.
Culture
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* User Research For Non-Researchers

User research doesn't have to be time-consuming, elaborate, or performed by a UX professional. If you're willing to talk to a few strangers, you can do user research. In this presentation, I'll talk about how to do lightweight research on any product or topic, no matter what your background and training are. I'll focus on the most effective tools for quick research, and some of the common pitfalls for novice researchers.
Cooking
Jane Davis

* Venturing into the Spooky Science of Ruby

Grab a scalpel as we put Ruby on the table to look at this lovely language's internals. We'll start with class inheritance and method lookup, and then explore the mysterious eigenclass and how it fits in. We'll use our newfound knowledge to turn children into zombies, meet unexpected vampires, and make our own Ruby mutants. Okay, so maybe it won't be too spooky, but you'll come away having a better understanding of Ruby objects and their internals (and braaaains!).
Chemistry
Zoe Kay

* What's in a name? Phonetic Algorithms for Search and Similarity

Search can be as simple as returning a word or part of word based on character similarity. LIKE and wildcard matches can be sufficient, but can only account for character or string matching, and fail on misspelled words or names. Phonetic algorithms can help us find matches for misspellings and typo'd user data.
Chemistry
Mercedes Coyle

* Why Making a Programming Language is Awesome

Learn about the journey of creating Wake, a modern programming language
Hacks
Michael R Fairhurst

Favorite proposals for this user

* 90 writing tips in 45 minutes

Almost every job involves a little writing, even if it's code comments or repair notes on a car. But what if you don't feel confident with writing? I have a rapid-fire presentation of writing tips and tricks that can help get you started, keep you going, and make your work better, even if you don't think you're a writer, I bet it will help!
Hacks 2015-01-20 02:50:35 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Machine Learning at Scale: Using Apache Spark and MLlib

A common problem of working with large sets of data is that machine learning tools are not able to scale effectively. Apache Spark is a fast, cluster computing engine that provides a rich toolset for machine learning called MLlib, which solves this problem of scaling.
Chemistry 2015-03-06 23:44:47 +0000
Sarah Guido

* Numfar, do the dance of compatibility: moving languages forward without leaving users behind

Moving a language forward in backward incompatible ways is often necessary, but can be hard on users. In this talk, I'll compare and contrast approaches used to support older code bases in different languages, and look at what works and what doesn't.
Cooking 2015-01-20 00:53:35 +0000
Adam Harvey

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Advanced Javascript Basics for Web Developers

Javascript is a necessity for modern web development. Whether it is to add more interactivity to your user interface, or provide a client to interact with your API, chances are, even if you're trying to avoid working in javascript, you're working in javascript. Projects like Coffeescript and Opal, while useful, still do not help understand the javascript outputted by these compile-able languages. One growing concern in this realm is that an application's javascript can sometimes be a security concern, easily exploited by a malicious user. In order to catch these concerns, you must know what your javascript does, inside and out. This talk will illustrate concepts to make sure your client code is secure, while still giving your team the flexibility it needs to keep building your stellar app!
Chemistry
Lauren Voswinkel

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk

* Introduction to Scala

Scala is an up-and-coming language, used by companies like Twitter and LInkedIn. This talk will give an overview of Scala and introduce basic language features.
Chemistry
Todd Lisonbee

* Math vs. Mathematics

Most people got through their high school math classes by memorizing nonsensical statements and regurgitating them on command. If you came out of that class hating math, no one would blame you, especially not a mathematician. However, that class didn't teach Intro to Algebra, it taught Intermediate Following Instructions.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh, Jenner Hanni

* Mushroom Data Demystified

Mushroom Observer is a tool for logging and mapping fungus sightings. Beginners and professionals collaborate to produce a comprehensive data set, which has contributed to the burgeoning science of mycology. While this talk focuses on Mushroom Observer, it will be an overview of usefulness of open source amateur contributions to scientific research.
Culture
Lauren Hudgins

* Open Source is Not Enough: The Importance of Algorithm Transparency

Opaque algorithms increasingly control our access to information, on the web and beyond. Why is that a problem, and what can we do about it?
Culture
Rachel Shadoan

* Random

If you want to understand randomness better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Slytherin 101: How To Win Friends and Influence People

Do you wish that you were better at getting people to do what you need them to do? Do you keep getting put in charge of things and then get stuck wondering how the heck you're supposed to get things done? Do you keep getting into conflicts with other people because of stuff you've said, and you aren't entirely sure why? Fortunately, Slytherin House has you covered. Come to this talk and learn the basics of how to hack human relationships, using the tools of cunning and ambition to achieve inter-House harmony. As long as you promise not to use these techniques to support the next Dark Lord, of course.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Unicode Beyond Just Characters: Localization with the CLDR

Unicode is much more than just characters. The Unicode Consortium defines open standards for collating, parsing, and formatting data in much of the world’s languages. The Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) is the largest standard repository of locale data along with specifications for its use and is a powerful resource for software localization.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* Write an Excellent Programming Blog

As a member of the open source community, do you contribute only code, or also words? Writing about programming benefits yourself and others. This talk outlines solid article structures, suggests topics to write about, explains how blogging about programming is special, and inspires you to write articles of enduring value.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* xmonad: the window manager that (practically) reads your mind

Many desktop environments try to be easy to use for the average user, but that's not you. You're at your computer all day writing code; you don't have time to waste _dragging windows_ (ugh!) or watching _animated transitions_ (yuck!). David Brewer will demonstrate how by using xmonad, a tiling window manager, you can bend your desktop to your will and control your windows with telepathy. Kind of.
Cooking
David Brewer

Favorite proposals for this user

* Balancing Corporate Need and Community Good: Thoughts from the Xen Project

When you have a project with strong corporate interest, how do you safeguard the Open Source community life and values? How do you keep Open Source from being simply another corporate development methodology when it is, in fact, the key to geek empowerment?
Culture 2014-03-17 15:01:51 +0000
Russell Pavlicek

* Having Pure Fun on the Web With Haskell

Practical programming in Haskell: is that an oxymoron? Not at all: in recent years, many programmers have joined together to create a vibrant library ecosystem for the Haskell programming language. In this interactive workshop, you will see the skeleton of a web service implemented in Haskell, then write your own code to implement the missing pieces. Whether you go on to learn more Haskell or just apply new ideas to your work in any language, you'll leave knowing the Haskell is pure fun.
Chemistry 2014-03-06 07:06:50 +0000
Tim Chevalier

* Promises Kept: The New Javascript Design Pattern

Javascript Promises are a new design pattern in javascript that is easy to use and understand but also makes your code more powerful. Learn how to get started using this design pattern and how it will clean your code and make you seem smarter.
Cooking 2014-04-04 13:35:56 +0000
Stefan Hayden

* RESTful Micro-service communication over AMQP

In the last several years, the web application has evolved from “monolith” to collection of APIs. In this presentation, we discuss the advantages, the difficulties, and some of the technologies involved in getting APIs to talk with each other successfully.
Cooking 2014-03-17 18:26:54 +0000
Serge Domkowski

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Clone A Git Together Into Your Town

Git is used everywhere, but few structured communities or groups exist. Learn about the PDX Git Together and how to clone this community model into your town.
Culture
Duke Leto

* Custom Markup for Working and Writing

We show how both doing work and writing about work are enhanced by special purpose markup hosted by federated wiki plugins.
Hacks
Ward Cunningham

* DIY: Creativity and Open Source

Panelists will discuss their uses of open source tools in creative applications, from design to art to hardware.
Culture
Melissa Chavez, Sarah Sharp, Cloë Latchkey, Cameron Adamez

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Hacking your Meatware: exercises you can do at your desk

You will learn about risks to your neck, shoulders, hips and core from sitting at a keyboard for hours at a time. Learn a quick 6-breath sun salutation, simple stretches, the need for regular movement. Discuss sitting, standing, walking, reclining. Simple, incremental, safe, easy.
Hacks
Kurt Sussman

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Keynote — Alex “Skud” Bayley

Keynote by Alex “Skud” Bayley
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Morning Keynote: James Vasile

Open source!
Culture
James Vasile

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Pro Bash Development; Way Beyond Shell Scripting

All Unix/Linux users know a little shell scripting, even if they're unaware of it. Pipes, for example, are a part of the Bash/sh language. Bash/sh, i.e. shell scripting, is usually treated as just that: shell scripting. But if you're crazy enough, you can develop full-blown profession, modular, and tested (yes, tested!) programs in Bash. It takes a little finesse, but I'll show you how, and you just might think twice about using Bash--really using it--in the future.
Hacks
Daniel Nichter

* Product Management in the Open (Source) - community and direction

Product Management is a generally well defined discipline inside large corporate organizations. But how does it work in the open source world? Do we need it? How does product consensus happen in open source?
Business
Larissa Shapiro

* Simple Questions Should Have Simple Answers

What happens when a project begins to embrace the philosophy that simple questions should have simple answers? Q: Simple to whom? A: Simple to the person asking the question. "Simple questions should have simple answers" has given me a lot of design clarity in my projects. I hope to convince you of its beneficial effects.
Culture
Michael Schwern

* The Future of Ruby

What will Ruby, the programming language and community, look like in 2 years?
Culture
Brian Shirai

* Unicode Best Practices

Developing applications to handle the natural languages and written scripts of the world—or even a small handful of them—is an impressively large task. Fortunately, Unicode provides tools to do just that. It’s more than just a character set, it’s a collection of standards for working with the world’s textual data. The problem is: Unicode itself is complex!
Cooking
Nova Patch

Favorite proposals for this user

* Conference Presentation Mind Control

Have you been at a talk which sounded great on paper, but was lackluster in delivery? Have you discovered that some presenters can seem to make *anything* interesting? Do you want to know how to hack audiences to convince them that your talk is *freakin' amazing* even though it's content-challenged? Want to use your conference presentation skills to kickstart your career in world domination? BYO tinfoil hat.
Hacks 2013-03-10 05:06:32 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Unicode Regular Expressions

Modern regular expression engines have been rapidly adding new features for matching and parsing Unicode strings, providing powerful new tools to add to your toolkit.
Chemistry 2013-03-10 07:59:06 +0000
Nova Patch