Mike Mangino's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* !done - Hacking IRC Bots for Distributed Teams

When our company was acquired we needed a way to see everything that was done each day all in one place. Teams were using different methods to do this: standups, written reports, emails and meetings. Nothing stuck. Done reports introduces a simple IRC command: !done. Team members say !done and what they just did. These !dones are put into a daily report. !done becomes a part of everyday at work, not a strained task that’s easily forgotten.
Culture
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* How Good is My Business Idea? Strategic Analysis for Techies

We'll look at methods for evaluating business ideas with a focus on business strategy. We will see how building a business on Open Source changes the equation and will look at the many mistakes I made with Elevated Code.
Business
Mike Mangino

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Labor, ethics and computing

An exploration of labor and ethics from various points in the life of a computer -- from the day-to-day software programming and hardware inside the computer down to the materials used in various components. Includes the implications for open source hardware and software as well as possible future solutions.
Chemistry
Cameron Adamez

* Mobile Sync, HTML5, and NoSQL

Mobile database sync helps insulate your users from unreliable wireless data connections, so your app feels faster, and is always ready when your users need it.
Chemistry
J Chris Anderson

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* Remote Pair Programming

Remote Pair Programming: my setup, some advice, and a live demo^H^H stress test
Cooking
Sam Livingston-Gray

* Shall We Play A Game?

In just 1.5 hours, I will help you craft a computer game AI that will consistently beat you and your friends.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Simple Questions Should Have Simple Answers

What happens when a project begins to embrace the philosophy that simple questions should have simple answers? Q: Simple to whom? A: Simple to the person asking the question. "Simple questions should have simple answers" has given me a lot of design clarity in my projects. I hope to convince you of its beneficial effects.
Culture
Michael Schwern

* Teaching Robots to See With Javascript

Computer Vision, Javascript, and Flying Drones.
Hacks
Peter Braden

* Test Driven Development with AngularJS

Learn how to practice test driven development in JavaScript using AngularJS
Cooking
Joe Eames

* Where "Small is Beautiful" meets "Big Data"- Empowering Local Communities with Open Hardware

"The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed" - Author William Gibson Whether rightly or wrongly so, it has been argued that the "information revolution' has resulted in a wider gap between those with skills and access to digital resources and those who do not. The same can apply to entire communities where language, geography and cultural barriers have created a new world of "Have Nots". The growing civic hacker movement is making long strides towards eliminating the "silicon ceiling" effect, but thanks to the emerging practice of "open hardware" the "civic hacker" is joined by a new class known as the "maker"... The civic hacker is capable of great things, and already has enough of a track record to be proud of. But the hacker ultimately is, and should remain, part of a vanguard elite who like the Bletchley Park codebreakers of WWII possess skills of such value that the work of a single individual can have a direct impact on the outcome of a war (or election...) The "Maker" on the other hand represents a fundamental break from a passive society of consumers into something more closely resembling the small-scale producers and artisans on which the U.S was based on.
Culture
Andrew Jawitz

Favorite proposals for this user

* Pinoccio - Building an Open Hardware Company, Year 1

From starting an open-hardware business, to designing user-centric products, to running a successful crowdfunding campaign, to managing manufacturing and fulfillment. There are lots of unknowns. We'll cover all the gory details of how we started Pinoccio, including lucky breaks and silly mistakes.
Business 2013-03-20 18:22:29 +0000
Eric Jennings, Sally Carson