Heidi Waterhouse's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2017

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Community-Driven Future for Open Data Kit (ODK)

Open Data Kit (ODK) replaces paper surveys with smartphones. ODK tools are open-source and are primarily used by social good organizations to collect data quickly, accurately, offline, and at scale. ODK has been used to collect billions of data points around the world. In this talk, Yaw Anokwa and Hélène Martin, two of the leaders of the ODK community discuss the problems that inspired ODK’s design, demonstrate the impact the tools are having, and describe how the Open Source Bridge community can contribute to an open-source, community-driven future for mobile data collection tools.
Activism
Yaw Anokwa, Hélène Martin

* Building #Resist at Meetup: Actual Corporate Activism in the Age of Trump

Learn how Meetup made the decision to create #Resist, a free network of over 1000 Meetups worldwide that anyone could organize with or join, and the questions we had to ask about how a private company could help self-empower the public in an actual way.
Activism
Yanyi .

* Decoding the history of codes

The word "code" means different things to different people. In this talk, we explore cryptography and how it's evolved over time. We look at some key historical events and see how the art of encryption affected our lives.
Theory
Niharika Kohli

* Democratizing Data: What You Need to Know as a Developer to Keep Your Data Collection and Usage Ethical

By 2020 each person will create 1.7 MB of new data per second flooding us in 44 trillion GB of data! What’s this mean? From Uber’s “ride of shame” scandal to the role of Facebook’s news recommender in the presidential election we as developers must ask how we use data and what the implications are for open source software.
Activism
Lorena Mesa

* Failing Well

It's a fact of life--software breaks. But all is not doom and gloom. How we detect and handle errors drastically impacts the quality of both our systems and our lives. Knowing what to track, when to page, and how to find system weaknesses is critical.
Practice
Jason Clark

* Federating With The Trouble - Running Decentralized Communities

As moderators and admins of a mastodon/gnu social instance called Toot.Cat we were quickly propelled into navigating the strange new world of decentralized community stewardship.
Culture
Briar Schreiber, Lynn Cyrin, Brian Mock

* How To Mentor Humans

I feel passionately that women and epecially minority women in tech need mentors and that those already in tech have a duty to step up for them, even though it means getting out of their comfort zone. How do you mentor minorities? How do you mentor anyone? With kindness and respect.
Culture
Letta Raven

* I Have ADD and So Can -- Ooh, Shiny!

Neurodiversity is the hidden diversity on our teams. Unlike obvious external markers, mental and personality quirks or invisible disabilities are not always easy for us to remember or adjust for. But sometimes diversity in this area is as important as any other.
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* Learn to Type at 250 WPM Using Open Source Tools

The Open Steno Project is dedicated to the creation of open source software, hardware, and educational materials to bring machine stenography to the masses! Want to be a speed demon typist like the court reporters you see in movies? Now you can!
Practice
Josh Lifton

* Liar Liar Pants on Fire: Being a Kid in the Tech World

A year and 4 months ago, I turned thirteen. According to many sites I use, however, I turned twenty-six. It’s a little odd, so here’s why:
Culture
Sebastian Waterhouse

* Morning Keynote — Fake Science! Sad! A case study of the perils of Open Data

Open source allows anyone to use their skills to change the world--for better or for worse. In an era where the phrase "Fake News!" echoes from the highest office of the land, we have to cast a critical eye on the works that we promote and participate in. Open Data is no exception, and the use of Open Data to generate Fake Analyses is a real issue that can undermine social progress.
Activism
Emily Gorcenski

* Onboarding is Unboxing

A great product has a built-in “unboxing” planned from the start. It never leaves customers thinking about how to do something or figure it out. The funny thing about the companies that make those product experiences is that they usually don't give the same treatment to their employees. Let's start thinking of onboarding as unboxing - and start thinking of our team members as humans!
Culture
Kristen Gallagher

* Open Source Security for Activists: Changing the world and staying safe

Staying safe in dangerous times is no easy task, especially when you're speaking the truth to power. Despite giving a voice to millions, the internet is now also a place of danger for those who try to use it to amplify those voices and make them heard. I'll be talking about by my experiences as a Nonprofit Security Advisor using Open Source tools and knowledge to help keep activists safe at the coalface.
Activism
Chris Daley

* Out of the Game: How Apps Fail Oppressed Users (and what you can do to help)

Apps and websites routinely expose user information in service of social and interactive goals. But what happens when your user has a stalker? Many of these services will compromise the safety of users who are already at risk. Making things worse, some developers resist making changes, with justifications such as "If someone's in that much danger, they shouldn't be doing anything online," and "It's basically impossible to defend against a state actor." This overview will help developers take the risk factors into account, and make development decisions that puts control back into the hands of the users. There's no way to perfectly remove the risk of going online if you're in danger, but people will go online anyway. Many more users at risk are facing technically naive attackers than are facing highly skilled attackers such as state actors.
Activism
Alex Byrne, Azure Lunatic

* Quick and Dirty WordPress Sites That Don't Suck

If you're on a budget but you need a website that doesn't suck and actually helps your business / organization / cause, I'll show you how to create one for under $1000 / year and a lot of sweat equity.
Hacks
Kronda Adair

* Read, Write, Talk, Sing, Play: What Early Literacy Can Teach Us About Software Literacy

I'm not saying that you have to speak parentese to beginning software learners. They might be quite offended with you doing that, actually. What beginners often need, though, is not just to be set in front of a tutorial and told to come back when they're finished, but to have someone on hand to bounce questions off of or to talk them through problems and exercises so that they understand. Learners often pick up useful information by observing someone else at work using the language, but they can't just be there while you do things and learn it all by observation alone. One of the best skills a librarian has that goes mostly unnoticed is that they're really great at narrating themselves to others. When demonstrating (sometimes for the sixteenth time) how to go through a procedure to obtain resources or run searches, librarians narrate what they are doing and why. When reading a book to tiny people, youth services librarians often ask questions about what the characters are doing or feeling, so that the tiny people can use both the text and the pictures to decode what's going on in the story. Key information about the story is often communicated visually in a picture book, and sometimes in complete contradiction to the text. By providing scaffolding through narration, the librarian provides context and reasoning for the actions they're taking. By asking questions at regular intervals, the librarian can check to make sure understanding is happening and adjust to include perspectives they may not have been taking into account before. [...] Talking and explaining things to your learners, and with each other, is the best way to help them learn. So if you get the opportunity to have someone shadow you and ask you annoying questions about what you're doing and why you're doing it that way, take up the opportunity. (And request it all gets documented. Trust me.) By talking through things with someone who doesn't have your expertise, you shore up your own knowledge and help someone get more of their own. That leads to literacy.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* The Existential Tester: How to Assess Risk and Prioritize Tests

To test, or not to test? That is the question. With limited time and resources there are only so many tests we can write and run. How do you determine what features of a new project to test? How do you know when a test is obsolete, or needs to be updated? What gets run per-commit, nightly, or weekly? What should you test manually? This talk will give you a framework for thinking about how to assess risk on a project and prioritize your
Theory
Lucy Wyman

* The Hardest Problem in Tech(nical Interviewing) is People: The personal skills in interviewing

Technical interviews can be intimidating, but it’s easier if you have confidence in yourself and your ability to answer complicated questions. The hardest questions are not about sorting algorithms, but how you’ll work in a team, how you’ll resolve conflicts, and what it will be like to manage and work with you. This workshop exists to address the skills and theories of presenting yourself as confident, capable, and coachable.
Culture
Carol Smith, Heidi Waterhouse

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture
Carol Smith

* Theory behind Image Compression and Semantic Search.

This talk will focus on describing a matrix decomposition technique called Singular Value Decomposition that conveys important geometrical and theoretical insights about linear transformations. This technique is not as famous as it should be given the range of applications from science and engineering.
Theory
Santi Adavani

* Understanding Your Organization With Code Archaeology

Come on an expedition into the dark corners of your project's code basement, deep in that directory everyone avoids because it's filled with spiders and booby traps and two mysterious old versions of JQuery from 2012 that no one even remembers using. Instead of getting exasperated by variables called data and poor command-query separation, learn to use code archaeology as a way to understand your organization better.
Practice
Liss McCabe

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture
Sam Scott

* Want to own Twitter? The burgeoning Platform Cooperativism movement and what it means for you.

They have started up democratic copies of major platforms. They are building ways to better collaborate using the internet. They’re even talking about citizens buying out and protecting important internet communities like Twitter. Who are these people? They are Platform Cooperativists.
Activism
Taylor McLeod

* Why Is a Raven Like a Pull Request: What Writing Workshops Can Bring to Code Reviews

Many talks aimed at beginners to open source contribution assume that concepts like peer review and justification of intent are brand new. If you have ever experienced the thrills–and/or horrors–of a writing workshop, many ideas central to a successful pull request aren't that new at all. Let's talk about what experienced workshoppers and the field of writing critique can bring to your OS project.
Culture
Christine Bryant-Ryback

* You Wouldn't Reimplement an API: Lessons from Oracle v. Google

Imagine being called for jury duty and then getting forced into a Java bootcamp run by two instructors who hate each other and won’t stop saying the opposite things. Worse, both instructors are inconsistent with themselves.
Culture
Sarah Jeong

Favorite proposals for this user

* Archetypal Ballers and Ternary Plots - Visualizing NBA Skills for Fun and Profit

Basketball is second only to baseball in its rich variety of detailed data and analysis techniques. This project uses two techniques to reduce this complexity. The first, archetypal analysis, is an unsupervised learning technique that reduces the 18-dimensional box scores to a three-dimensional vector. The second, ternary plots, provides an elegant visualization for comparing players and teams. Using these techniques, I'll review the 2016 - 2017 NBA season.
Theory 2017-03-29 21:44:54 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* De Falsis Deis: Social Contracts

Social engineering; it's a little more common and complicated than you might think. Wherever people live and work together, a social contract is formed. First theorized by Socrates and further expanded by Tom Hobbes, John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, this system is so fundamental most people take part in it unwittingly. Social hackers can use this to their advantage - and by breaking the social contract, we are all left vulnerable to attack. In this talk I will discuss how social contracts develop and how hackers use this natural human behavior against their targets.
Theory 2017-04-02 22:25:57 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Digital Activism at Government Scale

Government is huge, slow, and wasteful. You try to use its services, but they’re not doing what they were meant to. _You know_ how to make broken systems work. Join government to solve problems for everyone. … especially under an Administration you oppose.
Activism 2017-04-01 06:37:15 +0000
Yoz Grahame

* Diversity in Open Source Communities

This talk is about "Why diversity is important part of open source communities culture. How to make your Open Source project and community diverse and inclusive, so that everyone feels good about joining. Different ways to be more inclusive and welcoming."
Culture 2017-04-06 06:52:02 +0000
Amita Sharma

* Edge Case Too: The Intersections of Identity

A thing that human brains do is generalize groups based on the individuals that they personally know who make up that group, either as examples of the group or as exceptions to the group. Thus, you get both #YesAllWomen and #NotAllMen. The easy way to beat this human tendency is to surround yourself with more than one person of that given identity or group membership....More likely than not, there's going to be one, maybe two, people in your immediate work circle who are part of groups that you're interested in recruiting more of into your profession or project. Usually. As we pointed out above, in some cases, you have one in your entire department who carry the entirety of their group identity with them wherever they may be going, without anyone else to be able to share the burden of being everyone's shortcut example of how that group behaves.
Culture 2017-03-07 20:00:12 +0000
Alex Byrne

* From the mouth of a child: A young hacker’s perspective on Open Source culture

I've been around Open Source my entire life. As a young FOSS dev, I've grown up looking at the community from the perspective that this is "my people". This talk looks at some of what I can definitively say are victories, a retrospective of two decades of lessons learned, and finally some challenges our community faces.
Culture 2017-03-10 01:42:02 +0000
Morgan Gangwere

* Hack Harassment: a New Initiative to Enable Communities to Reduce Online Harassment

In this presentation, we will present the methodology used to create a harassment dataset and classifier, the dataset used to help the system learn what harassment looks like, along with a call to action for anyone interested to get involved with the project directly.
Activism 2017-03-27 21:17:25 +0000
George Kennedy

* Here's Your Computer, Good Luck, Bye! Lessons Learned in Onboarding

Have you ever joined a team where they just turned you loose on day one and expected you to come up to speed on your own? How did that feel? In this presentation, we're going to look at onboarding from the perspective of a new hire. We'll go over what's worked and what hasn't worked for the teams I've been on. The specifics will be different for your teams, of course, but we'll discover some general principles together. By the end of the talk, you'll be coming up with your own ideas you can apply to your team's onboarding process. By making a few simple changes, you can improve morale, boost productivity, and keep your fellow engineers around longer.
Culture 2017-04-10 01:00:09 +0000
Ian Dees

* IndieWeb 101: owning your content and identity

The IndieWeb strives to create an alternative to content silos and the 'corporate web'. This is achieved through creating a single source of truth for your content and identity aka a personal domain. Let's explore the ramifications of this and answer any questions you might have together!
Activism 2017-03-27 21:45:45 +0000
Wm Salt Hale

* No Coding Skills Required: How to Contribute to Open Source in Other Ways

You always wanted to contribute to Open Source but you don’t know how to code (yet)? Or maybe you can but you simply want to contribute in other ways? The goal of this talk is to explore how you can use your skills and contribute to Open Source in ways that don’t involve writing code.
Practice 2017-03-22 11:16:33 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Overcoming Imposter Syndrome

It doesn’t help that the industry puts some pretty unrealistic titles and requirements out there, like ninjas, rockstars, and sorceresses. Anyone heard anything like this? “Looking for a PERL Warlock, with 10+ years in Ruby, Linux kernel contributions, and experience doing isometric transformations in canvas. COBOL experience a plus.” In the early years, even the worst of us were considered wizards because we could do what others couldn’t, plain and simple. But now, people think of it as much more of a commodity position, but still expect us to have the proficiency and skill of a ninja. Somewhere along the lines, people stopped admiring rockstars and started expecting them. I am a yellow belt in two different martial arts (That’s one above I-Just-Started), I’ve played in a cover band, and still dabble in some slight of hand coin magic. This does not make me a ninja, a rockstar, or a sorcerer. Trying to live up to these standards is tough to say the least.
Culture 2017-04-08 16:22:39 +0000
Dan Linn

* Privacy, Security and Crayons - Security Concepts for Kids

Security and Privacy are difficult enough concepts for adults, trying to frame them for children and young adults can feel impossible. In this talk, I will look at security and privacy topics, ways to protect against them and some examples of how to best frame this information for a younger audience.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:16:33 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* The Monster on the Project

Abusive behaviour can have profound effects on personal relationships but it can also make open source contributing and office life miserable. For those stuck in a team with co workers who exhibit toxic behavior, going to work every day can feel like going to a battlefield. Knowing how to identify and how to respond to unreasonable behavior is vital. In this talk we will look at the ways we can improve our office and FOSS communities by recognizing, managing and gracefully removing this toxic behavior.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:13:33 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Threading Yarn, Writing Code: What Traditional Arts and Crafts Can Teach Us About Programming

You’ve probably heard people say that programming is an art and a craft. Does it have anything to do with the traditional arts and crafts like cross stitching, knitting, or sewing? In this talk we’ll explore the intersection of traditional and modern crafts and what they can learn from each other.
Theory 2017-03-22 11:13:56 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Voting-Method-Reform Activism

Activists around the world are experimenting with using voting to coordinate their decisions, and it's obvious that secure, open-source software must handle this form of communication. Yet typically such software is developed without involving "voting architects" who understand the math behind fair and unfair voting methods. Let's bridge this gap. Together we can build surveys and decentralized collaboration systems that bring democracy to very high levels of fairness, especially compared to the intentionally unfair use of single-mark ballots in governmental elections.
Activism 2017-03-13 06:20:31 +0000
Richard Fobes

* We are the first line of defense

We, as developers, are the first line of defense for our friends, neighbors, and customers. Let’s own this responsibility and support one another in achieving a safer, more secure tech community.
Activism 2017-03-31 17:09:30 +0000
Eric Mann

* Welcome, new person! We're glad you're here.

One of the things I want to know when I walk into a new organization is "how do things happen here?" This includes both "how do we talk about about things getting done" and "how they actually get done".
Culture 2017-04-10 06:56:33 +0000
Social Justice SRE

* What is a Bug?: Imagination and Failure in Complex Systems

When working in complex systems, bugs become more than just one-line errors: they become stories and histories, manifestations of time and space. How do you deal with failure - not as an unanticipated event - but as a natural and expected outcome?
Practice 2017-03-26 02:46:10 +0000
Bonnie Eisenman

* Why the Internet Loves Cats

When you love your work, when you are passionate, it is easy to push yourself too hard and burn out. Burnout is a real problem in the tech industry. We hear a lot about self care, but what is it? How do you do it? And what does it have to do with cats on the internet? In this interactive session, we will explore the subject together to find an answer to these burning questions.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:28:03 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Your Emotional API: How Being A Better Human Makes You A Better Developer

Feelings are messy and uncomfortable, so why can't you just ignore them? Because research shows that emotional regulation skills have a significant impact on your job performance. In this talk you’ll learn how emotions are affecting your work by modeling them as an API and looking at their code.
Culture 2017-04-03 02:42:03 +0000
John Sawers

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Mod your Android

Take control of your hardware by installing an open build of Android. Learn about what is involved in installing a third-party OS on your phone or tablet. Bring your own device to hack on in a supportive environment.
Cooking
Jesse Hallett

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* Search-first writing for non-writers

Search-first writing makes you think about the structure of your document and product as a series of topics, instead of a big book. The days of linear documentation are over, or at least numbered. Users are much more likely to come to documentation through searches. As an open source creator, you may not have a writer to help you out with this, so how can you maximize their return on your minimal investment?
Cooking
Heidi Waterhouse

* Using Secure Boot for the powers of good

Secure Boot is a technology for limiting the files that computers will boot. Used wrongly, it restricts user freedom and turns computers into appliances. How can we use it for real improvements in security without losing the ideals of general purpose computing?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

Favorite proposals for this user

* Agile Crafting

Estimating the time a project will take is pretty much the hardest thing in software, and I don't think that's any different for any other crafting deliverable. Of course, sometimes we have done something so often that we KNOW it takes 50 minutes to make a batch of raspberry jam, but that's not the same as estimation. So if we can't rely on our own estimation, or that of others, what can we do? We can timebox from the other direction. Instead of trying to figure out how long something will take, we can decide how long we have to spend on it. After all, you are the boss of your creative experiences. If you don't deliver on time, it's disappointing, but probably not the end of your career.
Hacks 2013-03-01 20:20:52 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Open Source and Feelings: Maintenance as Empathy Work

"Maintainers shouldn't be passive, otherwise the project can lack vision, and being aggressive risks alienating new contributors. An assertive maintainer can make the project fun for contributors while retaining a sense of purpose and direction."
Culture 2013-03-10 00:40:40 +0000
Strand McCutchen

* Open Sourcing Book Publishing

You've got a great idea for a book. You write a publisher. You get accepted! Then you find out that they'll pay you $500 and a 10% royalty for your book rights, in exchange for your heart and soul over the next six months. You're crushed. Is there a better way? There certainly is!
Business 2013-03-06 16:40:03 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Working the System: Secrets of a Hiring Manager

There's no nice way to say it: Job hunting sucks. To succeed you need diligence, strategy and intel on your opponent. Come learn the tech hiring process from the point of view of the person on the other side of the table: the hiring manager.
Business 2013-02-05 19:45:52 +0000
VM Brasseur