Christie Koehler's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* Conducting Your Open Source Project

How are open source projects like symphonies? In this session, we will review leadership strategies and insights gained from conducting non-profit amateur performing ensembles. We will discuss how to coordinate and lead teams of volunteers in both top-down and self-governing organizations.
Business
Michael Alan Brewer

* Custom Markup for Working and Writing

We show how both doing work and writing about work are enhanced by special purpose markup hosted by federated wiki plugins.
Hacks
Ward Cunningham

* debugging without borders

Debuggers are great when you have intimate access to your codebase, server, and network. Sometimes, all you have is a web browser and some intuition, and you still have a problem to solve. What then?
Cooking
chris mccraw

* Dirty Tricks of Computer Hardware: What You Don't Know Will (Probably Not) Kill You

Ever wonder what you don't know about how your computer hardware really works? Do you tire of lying to your relatives that "gremlins" are the cause of intermittent data loss and blue screens, and not just a car from the 1970s? Let's take a journey into the wonderful world of wonky hardware and find out what can be done about it!
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* DIY: Creativity and Open Source

Panelists will discuss their uses of open source tools in creative applications, from design to art to hardware.
Culture
Melissa Chavez, Sarah Sharp, Cloë Latchkey, Cameron Adamez

* Expanding Your Empathy

I believe empathy is the core competency that is missing from much of the efforts to push the tech community in a direction towards more diversity of all kinds. Companies, communities and conferences cannot expect everything to magically change until they're willing to go deep and examine the systemic patterns and structures that keep underrepresented communities from feeling safe and welcome in the tech space.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Firefox Bug Rodeo!

Hands-on Bugzilla wrassling, Firefox busting, barrel riding showdown. Enter the dazzling gladiatorial arena of BUG TRIAGE with MOZILLA! We will make bugzilla.mozilla.org accounts, practice reading and understanding bug reports, discuss why and how to investigate and add information to bugs, explore searches and reports, and feel the glorious feeling of contributing to open access to information and awesome browsers for all!
Cooking
Liz Henry

* FirefoxOS

FirefoxOS is Mozilla's response to the problems that it sees with the mobile space. Walled gardens, platform fragmentation, and single-purpose SDKs in non-web programming languages threaten to close off the open web from the mobile space. In this presentation I will be covering the basics of FirefoxOS, and how it is the only mobile OS that answers to nobody but you.
Chemistry
Benjamin Kero

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Labor, ethics and computing

An exploration of labor and ethics from various points in the life of a computer -- from the day-to-day software programming and hardware inside the computer down to the materials used in various components. Includes the implications for open source hardware and software as well as possible future solutions.
Chemistry
Cameron Adamez

* Leveling up in DevOps: the Art of Bad Shell Scripts

What are the core differences in a DevOps intern, a beginner DevOpsian, and a senior DevOpsian?
Culture
Emily Slocombe

* Mobile Sync, HTML5, and NoSQL

Mobile database sync helps insulate your users from unreliable wireless data connections, so your app feels faster, and is always ready when your users need it.
Chemistry
J Chris Anderson

* Mod your Android

Take control of your hardware by installing an open build of Android. Learn about what is involved in installing a third-party OS on your phone or tablet. Bring your own device to hack on in a supportive environment.
Cooking
Jesse Hallett

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* Product Management in the Open (Source) - community and direction

Product Management is a generally well defined discipline inside large corporate organizations. But how does it work in the open source world? Do we need it? How does product consensus happen in open source?
Business
Larissa Shapiro

* Programming Is Debugging, So Debug Better

Debugging: The schedule destroyer, the confidence sapper, the mire in which thousands of working hours are lost every day. It's time to stop staring at those four lines of code, desperately willing the bug to appear. This session is about the philosophies that will steer you around bugs, strategies for dealing with them, and tools that can shorten a four-hour debugging session to five minutes.
Cooking
Yoz Grahame

* Quantitative community management

In this talk, you will learn the state of the art in community measurement, common mistakes made in surveying, and how to actively use data to improve activity within a project.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

* Search-first writing for non-writers

Search-first writing makes you think about the structure of your document and product as a series of topics, instead of a big book. The days of linear documentation are over, or at least numbered. Users are much more likely to come to documentation through searches. As an open source creator, you may not have a writer to help you out with this, so how can you maximize their return on your minimal investment?
Cooking
Heidi Waterhouse

* Shall We Play A Game?

In just 1.5 hours, I will help you craft a computer game AI that will consistently beat you and your friends.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Smart Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* The problem with passwords on the web and what to do about it

Handling user passwords safely is hard, but replacing passwords on the web in a reasonable way is even harder. Really, this should have been in the browser all along. This is where Persona comes in.
Chemistry
François Marier

* Training the trainers

This long session is a tutorial, with exercises, on how to run welcoming, effective outreach events targeted at bringing newcomers into your communities.
Cooking
Asheesh Laroia

* Unicode Best Practices

Developing applications to handle the natural languages and written scripts of the world—or even a small handful of them—is an impressively large task. Fortunately, Unicode provides tools to do just that. It’s more than just a character set, it’s a collection of standards for working with the world’s textual data. The problem is: Unicode itself is complex!
Cooking
Nova Patch

* Using Secure Boot for the powers of good

Secure Boot is a technology for limiting the files that computers will boot. Used wrongly, it restricts user freedom and turns computers into appliances. How can we use it for real improvements in security without losing the ideals of general purpose computing?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* What Is That Process Doing?

We're surrounded by programs we didn't write. Inevitably they eventually do the wrong thing, or they just don't do what we need, and we want to find out what they are doing. Learn how to spy on the processes you run.
Chemistry
Greg Price

Favorite proposals for this user

* Hacking Conference Tshirts

Know how you get all those great free tshirts at conferences? Don't you hate how they never seem to fit your feminine figure? Or worse yet, all that's left is sizes that are too big or too small! This talk will show easy modifications and alternative uses for those awesome conference tshirts!
Hacks 2013-02-08 17:30:25 +0000
Augustina Blair

* Lessons Learned from starting an Open Source Office

Twitter recently created an Open Source Office. Throughout this adventure, many lessons were learned and should be shared.
Business 2013-01-22 22:25:05 +0000
Chris Aniszczyk

* Unicode Regular Expressions

Modern regular expression engines have been rapidly adding new features for matching and parsing Unicode strings, providing powerful new tools to add to your toolkit.
Chemistry 2013-03-10 07:59:06 +0000
Nova Patch

* Write, Debug And Tests Apps for FirefoxOS

During this talk Schalk will go over all the bits and pieces you need, and have access to, to not only write apps but, also effectively debug and test your apps before submitting them to the Marketplace or serving them up directly from your own site.
Hacks 2013-01-24 22:44:48 +0000
Schalk Neethling

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* Open Source Tools for Freelancers

As a freelancer, you must be your own IT department. You are responsible for website hosting, backups, version control, project/time-tracking and invoicing. Finding inexpensive and maintainable solutions for these needs can be quite daunting. In this session, I will present an overview open-source solutions for these needs.
Business
Christie Koehler