Heidi Waterhouse's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Agile from the Open Source Trenches: Making agile work for Wikipedia engineering teams

Wikipedia’s innovative language and mobile engineering projects use agile development to create high-quality features and apps in faster iterations. This talk examines what works and what doesn’t when using agile development for large open source projects. This talk will help developers and engineering managers better implement a successful agile process for their open source projects.
Culture
Alolita Sharma

* Custom Markup for Working and Writing

We show how both doing work and writing about work are enhanced by special purpose markup hosted by federated wiki plugins.
Hacks
Ward Cunningham

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Just Don't Lick the Cookie: an open discussion about organizational dysfunction

When someone claims a task and then doesn't do anything with it, we call that "licking the cookie." Nobody in their right mind would pick up and eat the licked cookie or finish the project. In this session well talk about common forms of organizational dysfunction, and then facilitate a group discussion about working around, over, under or through organizational dysfunctions you've encountered.
Culture
Kellie Brownell, Sumana Harihareswara

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Mod your Android

Take control of your hardware by installing an open build of Android. Learn about what is involved in installing a third-party OS on your phone or tablet. Bring your own device to hack on in a supportive environment.
Cooking
Jesse Hallett

* Moonlighting in Sunlight

How to deal with legal issues around having a day job and working on open source projects on the side.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* Search-first writing for non-writers

Search-first writing makes you think about the structure of your document and product as a series of topics, instead of a big book. The days of linear documentation are over, or at least numbered. Users are much more likely to come to documentation through searches. As an open source creator, you may not have a writer to help you out with this, so how can you maximize their return on your minimal investment?
Cooking
Heidi Waterhouse

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* The problem with passwords on the web and what to do about it

Handling user passwords safely is hard, but replacing passwords on the web in a reasonable way is even harder. Really, this should have been in the browser all along. This is where Persona comes in.
Chemistry
François Marier

Favorite proposals for this user

* Agile Crafting

Estimating the time a project will take is pretty much the hardest thing in software, and I don't think that's any different for any other crafting deliverable. Of course, sometimes we have done something so often that we KNOW it takes 50 minutes to make a batch of raspberry jam, but that's not the same as estimation. So if we can't rely on our own estimation, or that of others, what can we do? We can timebox from the other direction. Instead of trying to figure out how long something will take, we can decide how long we have to spend on it. After all, you are the boss of your creative experiences. If you don't deliver on time, it's disappointing, but probably not the end of your career.
Hacks 2013-03-01 20:20:52 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Cryptography: Demystified

Understanding and Trusting Cryptography
Cooking 2013-02-17 23:26:22 +0000
Renning Bruns

* Emotional barriers to getting stuff done

Sometimes you know exactly how to solve a problem, but yet you can't get started. Why is this, and what can you do about it.
Chemistry 2013-03-24 01:42:00 +0000
Daniel Johnson

* Freedom or Swag? -- OLD MAN YELLS AT CLOUD

This is why we can't have nice things, peace, or privacy: When closed software or services are offered for free or cheap and found to be "good enough", the market creates barriers to innovation and freedom. Surrendering freedom is convenient and easy, keeping it requires ongoing vigilance. Why would a business not give its customers what they want?
Business 2013-03-24 06:55:58 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* Git Going with Github

Git is hard. There's no way around that. But it's also incredibly powerful. Github is not all of git. It's not even most of git. But it's (mostly!) friendly, and getting a handle on it opens up worlds of possibilities, from contributing to projects to saving your own work. And it's a great stepping-stone if you want to go on and learn more git.
Cooking 2013-03-08 20:07:48 +0000
Noirin Plunkett

* Making Distributed Teams Work For You

Every company has encountered the same problem before: the best person for a role lives somewhere else. The company has to make a choice: hire the person remotely or lose out on a great opportunity. Too often, companies aren’t ready to hire remotely, and they lose top talent as a result. Learn how to construct a distributed team that is just as effective as the team you have in house. Brandon has been working remotely for more than two years, and will share his experiences working on a distributed, multinational team at Mozilla.
Business 2013-03-06 15:00:44 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Open Sourcing Book Publishing

You've got a great idea for a book. You write a publisher. You get accepted! Then you find out that they'll pay you $500 and a 10% royalty for your book rights, in exchange for your heart and soul over the next six months. You're crushed. Is there a better way? There certainly is!
Business 2013-03-06 16:40:03 +0000
Brandon Savage

* The Social Web has become a Hostile Web and How We Start Fixing That

There's a bodega across the street from the loft where my partner and I live. To get there, I walk out the door and up to a crosswalk, there's a button that activates warning lights indicating that someone's in the crosswalk which I press, and then cross the busy street. I walk into the market, get a six pack of my favorite IPA, pay cash for it, and return home. Now, let's go shopping online! Here's a suggested list of steps for using a browser safely as given by the CTO of a security company. And this list only covers browsing, not shopping. # Uninstall client-side Java. # All browser plugins should NOT auto-run, instead configured to "click-to-play." # Install security and privacy protecting add-ons including Adblock, Disconnect, Ghostery, Collusion, and NoScript. # this list continues for several more steps... I'd also suggest installing some software that alerts you to unexpected outgoing requests your computer is making. And all of this before typing anything into the URL bar, or the search box (by the way, did you turn autocomplete off?) All of those steps are like having to put on body armor, hard hat, safety googles, and goalie pads just to cross the street to my local market. Worst of all, I have to understand the underpinnings of the web to see why I'd want to take those steps. Something's gone terribly wrong with the web.
Business 2013-03-24 00:22:42 +0000
Bill Humphries

* Thinking inside the box: Using Things of the Internet to monitor the Internet of Things.

Why use closed source or closed platform tools to monitor the "Internet of Things" when the sysadmin community has been using open source monitoring tools for years?
Cooking 2013-03-24 04:29:14 +0000
Donald Delmar Davis

* We're All Angels Now: Crowdfund investing, and the beginnings of the Open Startup movement

We've done a great job getting open source into companies. But we've struggled to improve the openness and transparency of the companies themselves. Learn how Crowdfund Investing is combining with the Open Startup movement to to give the open source community a transparent and powerful new way to build companies, how it works, and how we can all benefit from it.
Business 2013-03-23 00:12:19 +0000
Kyle Drake

* What the Hell Just Happened? How to kill great ideas and alienate everyone by mismanaging your project.

You had the best idea ever. You even had everyone convinced it was the best idea ever. You had a proven plan for project management strategy. But now your best idea is smoldering on the ground, and everyone is running for the exits. What the hell just happened?
Business 2013-03-20 22:27:58 +0000
Chris Chiacchierini

* Working the System: Secrets of a Hiring Manager

There's no nice way to say it: Job hunting sucks. To succeed you need diligence, strategy and intel on your opponent. Come learn the tech hiring process from the point of view of the person on the other side of the table: the hiring manager.
Business 2013-02-05 19:45:52 +0000
VM Brasseur