Emily Stolfo's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013 Birds of a Feather

Favorite proposals for this user

* MongoDB Users (Confirmed)

Informal meetup for MongoDB users. MongoDB is a leading open-source NoSQL database, developed by 10gen. Join two programmers from 10gen to ask questions and share ideas.
BOF 2013-06-15 11:08:10 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis, Emily Stolfo

* Ruby Beginners Meetup (Confirmed)

Informal meetup targeted at newcomers to Ruby. Bring questions. Drink $beverage. Hack. Experienced Rubyists welcome; we want you to share your expertise!
BOF 2013-05-20 23:56:36 +0000
Kirsten Comandich

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Agile from the Open Source Trenches: Making agile work for Wikipedia engineering teams

Wikipedia’s innovative language and mobile engineering projects use agile development to create high-quality features and apps in faster iterations. This talk examines what works and what doesn’t when using agile development for large open source projects. This talk will help developers and engineering managers better implement a successful agile process for their open source projects.
Culture
Alolita Sharma

* Hacking the academic experience

When I was asked to teach Ruby on Rails at Columbia University I observed that a significant number of the skills required to become a successful professional in the industry are acquired on the job and aren’t being taught in school.
Culture
Emily Stolfo

* Hacking your Meatware: exercises you can do at your desk

You will learn about risks to your neck, shoulders, hips and core from sitting at a keyboard for hours at a time. Learn a quick 6-breath sun salutation, simple stretches, the need for regular movement. Discuss sitting, standing, walking, reclining. Simple, incremental, safe, easy.
Hacks
Kurt Sussman

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* Remote Pair Programming

Remote Pair Programming: my setup, some advice, and a live demo^H^H stress test
Cooking
Sam Livingston-Gray

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

* The Future of Ruby

What will Ruby, the programming language and community, look like in 2 years?
Culture
Brian Shirai

* What Is Async, How Does It Work, And When Should I Use It?

"Asynchronous" or "non-blocking" frameworks like Tornado and Node.js are in fashion, but most programmers still don't have a rigorous understanding of what's meant by asynchronous, how these frameworks function, and when they're appropriate to use. I'll give a detailed tour of Tornado's event loop and show exactly how it works, and under what circumstances it's superior to a traditional multithreaded web server. You'll learn how to write the most efficient servers for modern apps with very large numbers of concurrent connections.
Chemistry
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis