Justin Hileman's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013 Birds of a Feather

Favorite proposals for this user

* MongoDB Users

Informal meetup for MongoDB users. MongoDB is a leading open-source NoSQL database, developed by 10gen. Join two programmers from 10gen to ask questions and share ideas.
BOF 2013-06-15 11:08:10 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis, Emily Stolfo

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* !done - Hacking IRC Bots for Distributed Teams

When our company was acquired we needed a way to see everything that was done each day all in one place. Teams were using different methods to do this: standups, written reports, emails and meetings. Nothing stuck. Done reports introduces a simple IRC command: !done. Team members say !done and what they just did. These !dones are put into a daily report. !done becomes a part of everyday at work, not a strained task that’s easily forgotten.
Culture
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* debugging without borders

Debuggers are great when you have intimate access to your codebase, server, and network. Sometimes, all you have is a web browser and some intuition, and you still have a problem to solve. What then?
Cooking
chris mccraw

* Designgineering

Open source software engineering and user interface design got off on the wrong foot. Sadly it’s holding our projects back from reaching their full potential. Let’s talk about how we can bring these seemingly incompatible disciplines together in perfect harmony by simply learning each other’s craft, and how to get started doing so. Whether you are an engineer or a designer you will learn where to get started and how to have fun doing it.
Culture
Trevor Parscal

* Hacking social software with pump.io

pump.io is a platform for people who love writing social software and hate ever-changing terms of service. It's an Open Source, federated social network that works! And it's fun, too.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* How My Kids Are Learning to Program By Talking

My children have patiently tolerated a number of teach-STEM-quick schemes their dad has brought home. They've taught robots to dance, created simple animations using Scratch, and, quite frankly, made a lot of poop jokes. What's missing from these programming tools was storytelling. The ones we tried focused either on easy interactivity or expressive power. If only there were a way to combine the two... oh, wait, there was—46 years ago!
Culture
Ian Dees

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Let The Internet Work For You

Creating a successful Open Source project isn’t intuitive, or easy. Converting a brilliant idea into a working code base, then publishing it to Github (with significant adoption) is hard enough, nevermind building an ideal development and release workflow. Sometimes, getting your OSS code out to the community is the easy part -- then the real work ensues. Juggling between the roles of; creator, maintainer and contributor while managing the interests of the group effort (IRC, mailing lists etc) and issue trackers can quickly scale from simple and exciting, to a time consuming full time job. I plan to take you on a ride, demonstrating how Open Source developers can leverage free service offerings (for open source) to make your life as a project maintainer easier and more rewarding; from development and QA automation through to continuous deployment.
Cooking
Sebastian Tiedtke

* Mobile Sync, HTML5, and NoSQL

Mobile database sync helps insulate your users from unreliable wireless data connections, so your app feels faster, and is always ready when your users need it.
Chemistry
J Chris Anderson

* More Code, More Problems

Some people will tell you that you need a large, full-stack framework to do web development The Right Way. These people are wrong.
Cooking
Edward Finkler

* My First Year of Pull Requests

Open source folks are passionate about the tools they make and want others to get involved. Yet, in the past year that I've been developing software full time, I've seen a wide variety of responses from maintainers. On one hand, I've been inspired by the Travis-CI maintainer who followed up with my bug report over several weeks, on the other hand, my pull request to JDBC has lain fallow.
Culture
Fiona Tay

* PHP for Pirates: pillaging interactive debugging from Ruby and JavaScript.

It's sad that in 2013, var_dump and die are still two of the most common debugging and reflection techniques in PHP. Let's explore the state of interactive debugging in PHP, compare it with what's available in other languages, and apply this with practical tools and techniques which can be used today.
Cooking
Justin Hileman

* Polling: It's Good Enough for the WWW & It's Good Enough for You

Lately everyone loves pushing: you get push notifications on your iOS device, cloud to device messages on your Android device, and something about web sockets. Pushing seems natural. "Hey! I have some data for you, let me send it to you," says the pusher. Too bad it doesn't scale effectively.
Cooking
Jessica Lynn Suttles

* PostgreSQL Replication - The Most Exciting Technology on Earth

This electric discussion will journey through several available methods of replication using PostgreSQL.
Chemistry
Edward Snajder

* Programming Is Debugging, So Debug Better

Debugging: The schedule destroyer, the confidence sapper, the mire in which thousands of working hours are lost every day. It's time to stop staring at those four lines of code, desperately willing the bug to appear. This session is about the philosophies that will steer you around bugs, strategies for dealing with them, and tools that can shorten a four-hour debugging session to five minutes.
Cooking
Yoz Grahame

* Remote Pair Programming

Remote Pair Programming: my setup, some advice, and a live demo^H^H stress test
Cooking
Sam Livingston-Gray

* Search-first writing for non-writers

Search-first writing makes you think about the structure of your document and product as a series of topics, instead of a big book. The days of linear documentation are over, or at least numbered. Users are much more likely to come to documentation through searches. As an open source creator, you may not have a writer to help you out with this, so how can you maximize their return on your minimal investment?
Cooking
Heidi Waterhouse

* The Future of Ruby

What will Ruby, the programming language and community, look like in 2 years?
Culture
Brian Shirai

* The problem with passwords on the web and what to do about it

Handling user passwords safely is hard, but replacing passwords on the web in a reasonable way is even harder. Really, this should have been in the browser all along. This is where Persona comes in.
Chemistry
François Marier