Melissa Chavez's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2017

Favorite sessions for this user

* #workzoneWTF: crowdsourcing policy change in PDX

Walk or ride your bike around Portland long enough and you'll come across unsafe sidewalk and road closures. To paint a clear picture of this issue, Oregon Walks and The Street Trust (BTA) ran a social media campaign collecting hundreds of photos and videos from citizens using a little tech sauce we whipped up. The pressure was on for City Hall to pass new closure requirements, which they did unanimously. This talk covers the people, the methods, and the open tech used to help move the needle.
Activism
Tim Welch

* Building #Resist at Meetup: Actual Corporate Activism in the Age of Trump

Learn how Meetup made the decision to create #Resist, a free network of over 1000 Meetups worldwide that anyone could organize with or join, and the questions we had to ask about how a private company could help self-empower the public in an actual way.
Activism
Yanyi .

* Democratizing Data: What You Need to Know as a Developer to Keep Your Data Collection and Usage Ethical

By 2020 each person will create 1.7 MB of new data per second flooding us in 44 trillion GB of data! What’s this mean? From Uber’s “ride of shame” scandal to the role of Facebook’s news recommender in the presidential election we as developers must ask how we use data and what the implications are for open source software.
Activism
Lorena Mesa

* Design Automata: The DevOps Approach To User Interface Design

How-To-Create rapid, reusable, web-based User Interface design prototypes with Open Source tools and Creative Commons licensed assets
Practice
Skyler Reed

* Effective Presentations Using Applied Logical Fallacies

For many novice speakers, especially technical speakers, the hardest part of presenting is not figuring out what to put in but what to leave out. But what works for an academic paper doesn't work in a 10 minute presentation, and you risk boring your audience long before you manage to convince them of anything. This talk is intended to be a fun (and perhaps a bit silly) look at the science and the art of being convincing. I will cover how logical fallacies are used in propaganda, lying, and how you can use them to get your point across quickly. And don't worry, we'll also talk about how to do this ethically!
Practice
Terri Oda

* Falsehoods Programmers Believe About (Human) Languages - Common pitfalls in interface translation

Making open source software translatable is easy, right? You just take out all the strings, put them in a translation file in your git repository, and start accepting pull requests. Simple! Well, not so fast. There’s a lot more to this than meets the eye, and if you take a quick and dirty approach you’ll end up with upset translators, complaints from users, and mysteries like “what is ١٢٬٣٤٥٬٦٧٨ and why does my code want to parse that as a number?”. Thankfully, there are open source resources and libraries that can take care of these things for you.
Practice
Roan Kattouw

* Grassroots activism is hard. Can open source help?

Grassroots activists have to deal with many challenges - including the tools they’re using. Sounds like a great opportunity for open source! This session will survey progressive and transpartisan grassroots activists’ needs and today’s solutions (including techniques that work for explicitly intersectional groups), look at some existing open-source offerings and how they could evolve to better meet grassroots activists’ needs, and identify future directions that could be even more impactful.
Activism
Jon Pincus

* Hi! It takes more than engineering skills to make your company successful. Let's talk about it.

Let's be real: tech companies value engineering skills over most other skills, and it shows in both salaries and decisionmaking. This talk is about why this happens, why it's problematic, and how we can refocus importance on all the skills that make companies successful.
Culture
Lyzi Diamond

* How I Went From Newbie to Open Source Project Owner

This is the story of how focusing first on building a community of individuals who care about mentoring has allowed me to turn the idea of mentor matching for people learning to code into a multi-platform open source project.
Culture
Kim Crayton

* How to Prototype and User Test: A Workshop

Prototype early and test often! Learn how to brainstorm an idea, create a simple paper prototype, and conduct some guerilla user tests.
Practice
morgan miller

* In 1968 Mom built a computer: women's routes as technologists

On the surface, this story shares vignettes about my Mom. But its purpose is to increase awareness of human resources in technology, and overlooked pathways of young technologiests. "c. 1973 RCA hired her for the chip prototyping lab. Her new co-workers compared each other's crochet at lunch. A marathon week of late-night needlework bought her acceptance and promotion to supervisor. She told me stories about the ladies who wrapped wires for NASA a few years before, about women's centuries of fingers in technical fiber-crafts finally being noticed when it put men on the moon."
Culture
Katheryn Sutter

* It Can't Happen Here: But what if it does? Open-source alternative communication infrastructure

This talk will focus on what happens when the internet infrastructure we know and love goes down - by natural disaster or human-instigated shutdown (think Mubarak in Egypt during the Arab Spring).
Activism
jenka soderberg

* Making MLIS Classrooms Open Source: Activism, Service Learning, and Building Digital Community Archives

This presentation explores an ongoing project to incorporate digital repository building for community archives within a master's level library and information sciences classroom. The class taught under the pedagogical methods of service learning highlighted (and continues to highlight) the complex relationship between proprietary technology and archival 'best practices.' By reimagining this relationship, students were able to look at how open source tools and technologies better accomplished their desired outcomes to build a small-scale repository for their community partner, one whose narratives and materials were representative of feminist activism in the American South.
Activism
Travis Wagner, Elise Lewis

* Mapbox GL: A modern, robust, open source map renderer on web and mobile

Come learn about the open source Mapbox GL native and web map renderer, how it is designed, the open specs on which it is built, and how to use it in your projects.
Practice
Justin Miller

* Onboarding is Unboxing

A great product has a built-in “unboxing” planned from the start. It never leaves customers thinking about how to do something or figure it out. The funny thing about the companies that make those product experiences is that they usually don't give the same treatment to their employees. Let's start thinking of onboarding as unboxing - and start thinking of our team members as humans!
Culture
Kristen Gallagher

* Open Source Security for Activists: Changing the world and staying safe

Staying safe in dangerous times is no easy task, especially when you're speaking the truth to power. Despite giving a voice to millions, the internet is now also a place of danger for those who try to use it to amplify those voices and make them heard. I'll be talking about by my experiences as a Nonprofit Security Advisor using Open Source tools and knowledge to help keep activists safe at the coalface.
Activism
Chris Daley

* Quick and Dirty WordPress Sites That Don't Suck

If you're on a budget but you need a website that doesn't suck and actually helps your business / organization / cause, I'll show you how to create one for under $1000 / year and a lot of sweat equity.
Hacks
Kronda Adair

* Read, Write, Talk, Sing, Play: What Early Literacy Can Teach Us About Software Literacy

I'm not saying that you have to speak parentese to beginning software learners. They might be quite offended with you doing that, actually. What beginners often need, though, is not just to be set in front of a tutorial and told to come back when they're finished, but to have someone on hand to bounce questions off of or to talk them through problems and exercises so that they understand. Learners often pick up useful information by observing someone else at work using the language, but they can't just be there while you do things and learn it all by observation alone. One of the best skills a librarian has that goes mostly unnoticed is that they're really great at narrating themselves to others. When demonstrating (sometimes for the sixteenth time) how to go through a procedure to obtain resources or run searches, librarians narrate what they are doing and why. When reading a book to tiny people, youth services librarians often ask questions about what the characters are doing or feeling, so that the tiny people can use both the text and the pictures to decode what's going on in the story. Key information about the story is often communicated visually in a picture book, and sometimes in complete contradiction to the text. By providing scaffolding through narration, the librarian provides context and reasoning for the actions they're taking. By asking questions at regular intervals, the librarian can check to make sure understanding is happening and adjust to include perspectives they may not have been taking into account before. [...] Talking and explaining things to your learners, and with each other, is the best way to help them learn. So if you get the opportunity to have someone shadow you and ask you annoying questions about what you're doing and why you're doing it that way, take up the opportunity. (And request it all gets documented. Trust me.) By talking through things with someone who doesn't have your expertise, you shore up your own knowledge and help someone get more of their own. That leads to literacy.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Serving social spaces

Shared application servers are a vital building block for creating resilient information networks. Recent advances have made them dramatically easier to deploy and maintain in your home/workplace/community. Come for a tour, stay for a deep dive.
Activism
Eric Drechsel

* Starting Backwards

"topics include research, not losing your way, and not losing your mind."
Hacks
Caito Scherr

* Sustainability in Open Source for International Development

Duplication of effort, flawed funding models, and overall lack of project maturity has led to the failure of most open source projects in the international development space. In this talk, we'll discuss the plans of the Digital Impact Alliance at the United Nations Foundation to help increase those projects' maturity, quality, and reach -- with a goal of advancing an inclusive digital society using open source for the poorest places on the planet.
Activism
Michael Downey, David McCann

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture
Sam Scott

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* Build a Web Map with Open Source Tools

Come learn to make a map on the web! In this tutorial, we will build an interactive, data-filled web map using a number of open source tools including Mapbox.js (a JavaScript library based on Leaflet.js). We will cover several options for interactivity and data sources, and show how to integrate with external APIs and other mapping tools.
Cooking
Lyzi Diamond

* Building and maintaining a healthy community

Open Source organizations and projects are driven by the strength of its community. We have often seen but how big communities fall because of wrong ways of handling it or mismanagements. My talk will be around the lines of how a community leader or manager can take a few extra responsibilities to keep a community healthy.
Culture
Priyanka Nag

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Building mentoring into an open source community that welcomes and values new contributors

This session will talk about how to integrate mentoring into all the different layers of an open source project. This involves a change in the whole community which treats new contributors with respect, knowing they have something valuable to contribute to the project.
Culture
Cathy Theys

* Catalyzing Diversity: Practical Advice for Navigating Minority STEM Communities to Open Up Open Source

How can Open Source Software projects attract minorities? Come to learn practical strategies to implement your diversity goals into actionable outreach efforts. We will describe ways to tap into minority STEM communities that exist both online and in meatspace. The former include Tweet chats and hashtags used by people of color who are enthusiasts of science (like #BLACKandSTEM) and tech (like #LATISM). The live events include annual conferences of minority students and professionals such as the Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing.
Culture
Alberto Roca, Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Dog Food is for Dogs: Escape the Crate of Your Perspective with User Research

Dogfooding—using your own products—is nice, but is it sufficient to produce good design for people who aren’t you? Our familiarity with our projects and their quirks makes us poor substitutes for users in the wild. So just who are these users, and how do you incorporate them into design and development? In this workshop, we'll explore user experience design and research strategies that will help you design for people who aren’t you.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan, amelia abreu

* Escapology: multilingual ContentEditable rich text editing

VisualEditor, Wikimedia's rich text editor, extends and normalizes browser contenteditable behaviour from Javascript. To work well for all languages, it must satisfy a seemingly impossible set of constraints. This is the story of how we managed.
Hacks
David Chan

* For Love and For Money

Let’s talk about the work we want to do, the work we have to do, and how we might create systems that don’t continue to force bad choices between building community, technical work, and diversity activism.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* From the Unicorn’s Mouth: Stories of Managing Multiple Diverse Identities in Tech

We each have many critical facets to our identity-- race, gender, sexuality, class, health, and family background are just a handful of examples-- and the interaction between them can shape our lives more than any one factor alone. In this panel discussion, learn about intersectionality, and what the experiences of those living at the crossroads of different minority identities can teach us about what it takes to create a truly inclusive open source community.
Culture
Megan Baker, Thalida Noel, Nichole Burton, Lisa Sy

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal and social identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* Hosting Events that the Whole Community Loves

So, you're responsible for a growing an open source community and you want to ensure it's a friendly place for newcomers and old-timers alike. You want to make sure everyone feels welcome and has access to a variety of events (both on and offline) with content that meets the needs of all of your user base from beginner to advanced. This talk will...
Culture
Meg Hartley

* How to Teach Git

Version control is a necessary piece of the open source community and git has an unfortunately steep learning curve. Here is what I have learned from teaching git to beginners, so you don’t have to make the same mistakes.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh

* How you tell the story matters: telling better stories and making better technologies

What happens when we tell stories? How do we tell stories about the technology we build, why do some stories get told over others? How do we talk about our successes, and how do we not talk about our failures? Whose stories get heard: how do women, people of color, disabled people, and “non-technical” workers get left out of the stories we hear? In this talk, I'll explore the role of storytelling in technology, and share what I've found about telling better stories.
Business
amelia abreu

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Open source collaboration for tackling real world environmental problems

Public Lab is a two-part project -- an attempt at large-scale community environmental monitoring, AND a massively distributed R&D lab for inventing new monitoring techniques and equipment. The community has grown a lot over the past five years, and we are here to share stories of -- and welcome you to -- an emerging FOSS culture that spans hardware, software, data, community organizing, and advocacy.
Culture
Dana Bauer, Mathew Lippincott

* Project Fear

Project fear, not dissimilar to imposter syndrome, tends to affect all project leaders at some point (or many points) in their career. This session will tackle project fear by fully defining it, investigating its roots, noting its symptoms, and ultimately discussing a number of successful coping mechanisms.
Business
Adam Edgerton

* The Graceful Exit: Approaches for Changing One's Role in an Open Community

Open culture communities are passionate, dedicated backed by people. What happens when those people need to change their roles within the community? I've played varied roles in open culture communities through the years. In this talk I'll go over what worked well and what I wish I had approached in a different way when my role needed to change.
Culture
Kate Chapman

* The Open Source Writing Stack

Open source makes writing and publishing much easier both online and in print — provided you know what tools to use. This talk covers those tools (from LaTeX to WordPress) and how to choose between them.
Hacks
Thursday Bram

* Universal Web Design: How to create an awesome experience for *every* user

In this talk, I will describe how Universal Web Design principles can be easily applied to new or existing sites, how these principles will improve your users’ experience, and how Universal Web Design will save you time and money.
Culture
David Newton

* User Research For Non-Researchers

User research doesn't have to be time-consuming, elaborate, or performed by a UX professional. If you're willing to talk to a few strangers, you can do user research. In this presentation, I'll talk about how to do lightweight research on any product or topic, no matter what your background and training are. I'll focus on the most effective tools for quick research, and some of the common pitfalls for novice researchers.
Cooking
Jane Davis

* What stuttering taught me about marketing - not your typical soft skills talk

Your weakness just might be your greatest strength.
Culture
Sharon Steed

* What's in a name? Phonetic Algorithms for Search and Similarity

Search can be as simple as returning a word or part of word based on character similarity. LIKE and wildcard matches can be sufficient, but can only account for character or string matching, and fail on misspelled words or names. Phonetic algorithms can help us find matches for misspellings and typo'd user data.
Chemistry
Mercedes Coyle

* Why Relationships Matter in Community Building: Experiences from the Philippine Cultural Heritage Mapping Project

What makes a successful project? It's not only a solid idea, firm execution and attention to the numbers. It's also successfully building working relationships between community members. This presentation will explore how one of Wikimedia Philippines' biggest projects was successful in large part to how the organization engaged its participants, and ultimately how they have come to be part of the wider Filipino Wikimedia community.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Write It Down: Process Documentation from the Ground Up

The collective knowledge base of an organization can be difficult to crack. Some things have "always been done that way" but no one knows why. This talk will help to expose those undocumented corners of your project, and give you tools for writing process documentation for new contributors using lessons from Not-For-Profit organizations.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Your Job is Political: Tech Money in Politics

As much as the personal is political, the old-fashioned political still is too, and companies and individuals made rich by the tech industry and by open source software have been making increasingly direct monetary incursions into U.S. politics. Let's take a look at what policies & politicians our bosses, investors, users and contributors are buying at the local and state levels, with a specific focus on current changes in education policy and future moves in law enforcement.
Business
Kelsey Gilmore-Innis

Favorite proposals for this user

* 90 writing tips in 45 minutes

Almost every job involves a little writing, even if it's code comments or repair notes on a car. But what if you don't feel confident with writing? I have a rapid-fire presentation of writing tips and tricks that can help get you started, keep you going, and make your work better, even if you don't think you're a writer, I bet it will help!
Hacks 2015-01-20 02:50:35 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Could Spambots Exist in Victorian England? and other questions about technology, society, and communication

As a tool for human communication, the internet has successes and failures. It allows us to meet people, collaborate, strengthen communities, and learn new things. It also enables oppression, harassment, and noise. These problems aren't new, but choices made in constructing the internet have often served to blindly facilitate their spread. Instead of continuing to assume that the technical, social, and economic constraints that kept such problems from destroying past systems will continue to hold, let's break down what's different from then to now, and find a new set of solutions.
Hacks 2015-02-25 04:35:16 +0000
Audrey Eschright

* Objectivity is a Myth: Your Data is Not Objective and Neither Are You

Data is often treated as an impartial representation of reality--an unbiased delivery mechanism for "ground truth". Data collection, however, is designed by people, whose knowledge and beliefs influence the design decisions they make. How does that impact what we think we know, and how can we adapt our processes to account for it?
Culture 2015-03-08 01:37:51 +0000
Rachel Shadoan

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* Badging and Beyond: Rubrics and Building a Culture of Recognition as Community Building Strategies

What are the qualities you need more of in your open source community?
Culture
Larissa Shapiro

* Performance strategies for delivering web fonts at Wikipedia scale

Wikipedia supports almost 300 languages for its multilingual content communities. As mixed script web pages become pervasive and non-Latin language content grows exponentially, a breakthrough technology of delivering webfonts on demand has been deployed across 900 Wikimedia sites. This talk discusses user benefits derived from this technological advance as well some of the performance and scalability improvements made to deliver fonts at Wikipedia scale.
Chemistry
Alolita Sharma

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Civilizing IRC and forums: moderation strategies for mutual respect

As a project's public IRC channel or forum grows, it's hard to keep it friendly. People get frustrated with each other, people have "different" senses of humor, disagreements escalate...oh goodness, it can be a mess. This isn't great for retaining community members or welcoming new ones. I'll share my strategies for dealing with problems, learned at the scale of hundreds of forum threads, tens of thousands of forum visitors, and dozens of IRC chatters every day.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* Crash Course in Tech Management

Managing is a skill which you can master just as you did programming. This session will introduce you to many of the skills and resources you’ll need to become a successful tech manager (and keep your team from wanting to string you up).
Business
VM Brasseur

* Data Wrangling: Getting Started Working with Data for Visualizations

Good data visualization allows us to leverage the incredible pattern-recognition abilities of the human brain to answer questions we care about. But how do you make a good visualization? Here's a crash course.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan

* DIY User Research for Open Source Projects

Open source is only about open code, right? Wrong. Interviews, questionnaires, quick usability tests, and many other research types all have a place in the open source development process. With a few easy steps and a set of scripts to follow, your community can make user research an easy and essential component of your open source project.
Culture
Erin Richey

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* From navel gazing to ass kicking: Building leadership in the journalism code community

Amidst all the hand wringing surrounding the "future of journalism," developers, designers, and data geeks working in newsrooms are building projects and tools that engage readers and ripple across the web. We'll discuss ways this community welcomes, supports, and promotes new members and leaders.
Culture
Erika Owens

* Internet Archive: More than the Wayback Machine

In this session we will: * Give you a tour of Internet Archive and its collections * Introduce you to the APIs and tools you can use to access and contribute to the Archive * Show examples of how other people and institutions are using the Archive
Chemistry
VM Brasseur, Alexis Rossi

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Life-Hacking and Personal Time Management for the Rest of Us

Almost all the books and articles out there about taking Agile methods into your personal life seem geared to people who have control over their schedules. What about those of us who have childcare, eldercare, or other incompressible schedule demands?
Hacks
H. Waterhouse

* Lightning Talk Workshop

Heard of lightning talks but never considered giving one? Never fear, lightning talks are easy! During this session, you'll write and practice your first lightning talk.
Cooking
Michelle Rowley

* Lights, Art, Action! An exploration in technology, art, and making mistakes

Curious about integrating open source and art? We’ll explore a particular project in detail while providing both functionality and process recommendations. Both the art and the hardware will come to visit, along with the creators.
Cooking
Catriona Buhayar, Bill Madill

* Making language selection smarter in Wikipedia

It’s time to make Wikipedia language selection smarter -- to offer a user languages he/she actually wants to see in an article, and in an efficient way. In this talk we shall learn about : 1.The need for a compact language selector 2.How we achieved it in an Outreach Program for Women project. 3.What criteria we use to determine which languages might be most useful to a user, and why 4.How we implemented the feature 5.What concerns we heard from the Wikimedia community about this project 6.How everyone can help pitch in to make this project a success
Chemistry
Niharika Kohli, Sucheta Ghoshal

* Mushroom Data Demystified

Mushroom Observer is a tool for logging and mapping fungus sightings. Beginners and professionals collaborate to produce a comprehensive data set, which has contributed to the burgeoning science of mycology. While this talk focuses on Mushroom Observer, it will be an overview of usefulness of open source amateur contributions to scientific research.
Culture
Lauren Hudgins

* My Journey into Open Source Design

Becoming a contributing designer on an open source project is often tougher than contributing code. The pathways to designing for open source projects are often unclear. Using my own experience joining the WordPress project, I'll share how I think open source projects can make it easier for designers to contribute their skills.
Cooking
Mel Choyce

* Open Sourcing Mental Illness: Ending The Stigma

An open, honest discussion of mental illness from the perspective of a web developer. We can learn to survive, cope, and thrive.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* OpenStreetWhat? Mapping The World With Open Data

Come learn about OpenStreetMap, a Wikipedia-like project with over one million contributors aiming to map the entire world. We'll talk about the project, the data, and how to do some cool things with it.
Cooking
Justin Miller, Rafa Gutierrez

* Slytherin 101: How To Win Friends and Influence People

Do you wish that you were better at getting people to do what you need them to do? Do you keep getting put in charge of things and then get stuck wondering how the heck you're supposed to get things done? Do you keep getting into conflicts with other people because of stuff you've said, and you aren't entirely sure why? Fortunately, Slytherin House has you covered. Come to this talk and learn the basics of how to hack human relationships, using the tools of cunning and ambition to achieve inter-House harmony. As long as you promise not to use these techniques to support the next Dark Lord, of course.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Speaker Support of Awesomeness: How I went from stage fright to stage presence and want to help others do the same.

Once upon a time, I was terrified of public speaking. I went from having stage fright to being a stage presence who speaks at conferences. I run a support group for old and new speakers called the "Tech Conf Speaker Support of Awesomeness." I want to talk about what we do, why we do it, and how well it's worked out so far. This talk is about speaking for the first time, improving your talks, and how conference organizers and attendees can help too.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Stop Crying in the Bathroom and Start Your Own Business

The tech industry has a 'diversity problem' and companies are courting women, people of color and other marginalized people as the pressure mounts to hire someone besides 24-year-old cis, straight white male programmers. However, for many marginalized people, working in startups, agencies, and large tech companies can be a miserable, demoralizing experience that literally results in crying in the bathroom. There's more to life than startups. Come hear ideas for making your own path in the tech industry, without compromising your dignity or your mental health.
Business
Kronda Adair

* Supporting communities with Gittip

There are lots of people doing good work in the world, and while there seems to be a myriad of ways to provide financial "donations", few of them provide a way to do so in a sustainable manner. We're going to look at Gittip, a freedom loving platform to provide a sustainable, predictable income to those making the world a better place.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* The joy of volunteering with open technology and culture

Volunteering is a fun way to explore your interests and passions. In this talk, I will detail my experiences in volunteering with open projects like Wikipedia and Mozilla. I will also talk about fun ways to introduce newbies into volunteering based on my experience with conducting outreach sessions for open projects.
Culture
Netha Hussain

* The Promise of Collaborative Magic

Open source thrives on the idea of people helping one another in reaching their project's goals. But is it working the way that it's supposed to be? This session hopes to discuss the importance of constructive collaboration in our communities, how we encourage them, and what we can do if they're not working out the way they're supposed to.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Towards more diversity-friendly social networks

How can we make social networks more "diversity-friendly"? It starts with an anti-oppression attitude, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and includes the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments, and will include an annotated collection of resources on the wiki.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Deborah Pierce

* Unicode Beyond Just Characters: Localization with the CLDR

Unicode is much more than just characters. The Unicode Consortium defines open standards for collating, parsing, and formatting data in much of the world’s languages. The Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) is the largest standard repository of locale data along with specifications for its use and is a powerful resource for software localization.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* Unicorns Are People, Too: Re-Thinking Soft and Hard Skills

As developers, we tend to value hard skills that can be quantified or measured objectively. Job postings search for unicorns, but we are people first and foremost and being human isn't as easy as programming. While the code comes easily, the soft skills that make us human are complicated and difficult to get right. This talk will explore the danger of neglecting so-called "soft" skills, what we stand to lose by overvaluing technical skills, and alternatives to the hard and soft dichotomy.
Culture
Liz Abinante

* UX Design in Action: Redesigning the Mailman UI

One of the upcoming features in the Mailman 3 project is a front-end redesign of the mail archiver web interface. Learn more about the new interface, its progress so far, and the designing challenges of building a mobile-first responsive web site. The talk will also illustrate our design process and provide you with design methods and evaluation techniques that you can take back to your own project.
Chemistry
Karen Tang

* Working Effectively with People in Government on Open Source Projects

Ever thought about ways to use your open source skills to improve your city? In this session we'll talk about successful models for working with people in government, from pitching your project, communicating effectively, finding experts, tracking down data, to launching in the community.
Culture
Jason Denizac

Favorite proposals for this user

* Can Open Access to video tutorials make educators work harder?

Experiment with open access to video tutorials as key learning platforms where students learn, contribute and educators use the teaching time in a more effective manner.
Culture 2014-04-03 03:43:06 +0000
Subhashish Panigrahi

* Hacking Autism with the Kinect

I'll show a cool hack we did with the Kinect for kids with Autism
Hacks 2014-04-12 02:26:05 +0000
Justin Woo

* Herculean Labors for Mortals: Lessons in making daunting tasks manageable

Lessons learned from messy migrations and unruly upgrades. Sometimes we inherit (or create!) big messes, and have to untangle them before we can make more progress. I'll talk about some past and current projects that seemed like they might require Xena: Warrior Project Manager, and techniques that allowed me and my team to succeed (or at least live to fight another day), focusing on what can be generalized to many circumstances and projects.
Culture 2014-04-02 15:19:14 +0000
Juliana Perry

* Reproducible Journalism for Firefox Phones

Reproducible research, data journalism, mobile first - what happens when you mash them all up and deliver them to a Firefox phone?
Cooking 2014-04-04 03:37:52 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Scaling Open Source Outreach

In 2013, we ran a dozen open source outreach events at college campuses and reached hundreds of students, but for every event we ran there were more invitations we didn't have the resources to accept. In 2014, we're focused on scaling our workshops that so that community organizers everywhere can use our materials and welcome more people into open source. In this talk, we'll discuss what works and what doesn't when it comes to scaling community outreach.
Culture 2014-04-04 19:39:12 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Give me money" or "join me in doing this great thing"? A workshop on asking for donations from individuals

If you care about a project or cause, but fear adding individual fundraising to your business plan, come to this long-form workshop. By the end, you will enthusiastically seek out opportunities to ask for money and know how to build a strong community of support over time.
Business
Kellie Brownell

* Agile from the Open Source Trenches: Making agile work for Wikipedia engineering teams

Wikipedia’s innovative language and mobile engineering projects use agile development to create high-quality features and apps in faster iterations. This talk examines what works and what doesn’t when using agile development for large open source projects. This talk will help developers and engineering managers better implement a successful agile process for their open source projects.
Culture
Alolita Sharma

* Balloon & Kite Mapping Workshop

Low-budget, no budget, need aerial images fast? Learn to map with balloons and kites.
Hacks
Mathew Lippincott

* Citizenship Online: Open Source Politics

Online deliberation refers to applications which help communities make decisions. This varies from Exploratory deliberation, like Amazon reviews, where an individual makes a decision by consulting their community, to very structured Decision Making deliberations where a community needs to forge a single legally and logically defensible decision.
Culture
Ele Munjeli

* Come Make a Map: Completely Custom, Open Source Maps with TileMill

Map making doesn't have to be hard. Anyone can do it. And we'll show you how, using the open source design studio TileMill. Come make a map!
Cooking
Justin Miller

* Conducting Your Open Source Project

How are open source projects like symphonies? In this session, we will review leadership strategies and insights gained from conducting non-profit amateur performing ensembles. We will discuss how to coordinate and lead teams of volunteers in both top-down and self-governing organizations.
Business
Michael Alan Brewer

* Custom Markup for Working and Writing

We show how both doing work and writing about work are enhanced by special purpose markup hosted by federated wiki plugins.
Hacks
Ward Cunningham

* Data journalism

We're creating educational materials for the next generation of news-application developers to dig into open data and open government.
Culture
DAVID STANTON

* Data journalism

We're creating educational materials for the next generation of news-application developers to dig into open data and open government.
Culture
DAVID STANTON

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* DIY: Creativity and Open Source

Panelists will discuss their uses of open source tools in creative applications, from design to art to hardware.
Culture
Melissa Chavez, Sarah Sharp, Cloë Latchkey, Cameron Adamez

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Failure and Wikipedia: how encyclopedias work

This talk is about my experience with promoting Wikipedia in Indian languages, OpenGLAM projects in India and the problems I've encountered. I also want to draw parallels to how the encyclopedia project itself, especially online works on notions of rough consensus, thereby articulating a specific political position for the community and reflecting a world view through the knowledge they produce.
Culture
noopur raval

* How My Kids Are Learning to Program By Talking

My children have patiently tolerated a number of teach-STEM-quick schemes their dad has brought home. They've taught robots to dance, created simple animations using Scratch, and, quite frankly, made a lot of poop jokes. What's missing from these programming tools was storytelling. The ones we tried focused either on easy interactivity or expressive power. If only there were a way to combine the two... oh, wait, there was—46 years ago!
Culture
Ian Dees

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Keynote — Alex “Skud” Bayley

Keynote by Alex “Skud” Bayley
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Labor, ethics and computing

An exploration of labor and ethics from various points in the life of a computer -- from the day-to-day software programming and hardware inside the computer down to the materials used in various components. Includes the implications for open source hardware and software as well as possible future solutions.
Chemistry
Cameron Adamez

* Labor, ethics and computing

An exploration of labor and ethics from various points in the life of a computer -- from the day-to-day software programming and hardware inside the computer down to the materials used in various components. Includes the implications for open source hardware and software as well as possible future solutions.
Chemistry
Cameron Adamez

* Lessons From X

Lessons I've learned from 25 years of participation in perhaps the longest-running end-user-facing Open Source project.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Library of the future: building the Multnomah County Library website

The Multnomah County Library website has combined Drupal, Solr Search, Nginx, Varnish and a host of other technologies to build a highly scalable web infrastructure. The site takes advantage of responsive design techniques to provide patrons—the people who check out the books—with an impressive mobile experience.
Cooking
Joshua Mitchell

* Library of the future: building the Multnomah County Library website

The Multnomah County Library website has combined Drupal, Solr Search, Nginx, Varnish and a host of other technologies to build a highly scalable web infrastructure. The site takes advantage of responsive design techniques to provide patrons—the people who check out the books—with an impressive mobile experience.
Cooking
Joshua Mitchell

* Moonlighting in Sunlight

How to deal with legal issues around having a day job and working on open source projects on the side.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen

* Morning Keynote: James Vasile

Open source!
Culture
James Vasile

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Smart Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Study Design: the best model for a cat is... a cat!

With good study design you can state how confident you are that you have a cat. You can hypothesis test your cat--is my cat like other cats or is it a dog? You can even design an experiment to determine the correct feeding time for your cat.
Chemistry
Mary Anne Thygesen

* The "Oh Shit" Graph: What We Can Learn From Wikipedia's Editor Decline Trend

Wikipedia and the other Wikimedia projects have been hemorrhaging editors for the past five years. We're going to talk about the reasons why, how they can affect other projects, and what you can do to prevent it in yours.
Chemistry
Brandon Harris

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Training the trainers

This long session is a tutorial, with exercises, on how to run welcoming, effective outreach events targeted at bringing newcomers into your communities.
Cooking
Asheesh Laroia

* Where "Small is Beautiful" meets "Big Data"- Empowering Local Communities with Open Hardware

"The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed" - Author William Gibson Whether rightly or wrongly so, it has been argued that the "information revolution' has resulted in a wider gap between those with skills and access to digital resources and those who do not. The same can apply to entire communities where language, geography and cultural barriers have created a new world of "Have Nots". The growing civic hacker movement is making long strides towards eliminating the "silicon ceiling" effect, but thanks to the emerging practice of "open hardware" the "civic hacker" is joined by a new class known as the "maker"... The civic hacker is capable of great things, and already has enough of a track record to be proud of. But the hacker ultimately is, and should remain, part of a vanguard elite who like the Bletchley Park codebreakers of WWII possess skills of such value that the work of a single individual can have a direct impact on the outcome of a war (or election...) The "Maker" on the other hand represents a fundamental break from a passive society of consumers into something more closely resembling the small-scale producers and artisans on which the U.S was based on.
Culture
Andrew Jawitz

Favorite proposals for this user

* Evaluating open source GIS techniques for addressing database, analysis and visualization aspects of spatiotemporal information

Most GIS were not specifically designed to manage dynamic spatiotemporal data. Spatiotemporal mapping is the representation of changes in geographical phenomena. By identifying the characteristics of the spatial, temporal and attributional dimensions, we evaluate OSGIS techniques for data storage, retrieval, pattern analysis and visualization.
Hacks 2013-01-21 04:10:31 +0000
Lynnae Sutton

* Fluff: Collaborating to Publish a Fiberarts Magazine Using Open Source Tools

The handspinning community needed an online magazine; we're using open source software to make it happen
Culture 2013-03-24 02:59:06 +0000
Rose White

* Fluff: Collaborating to Publish a Fiberarts Magazine Using Open Source Tools

The handspinning community needed an online magazine; we're using open source software to make it happen
Culture 2013-03-24 02:59:06 +0000
Rose White

* Lessons Learned from starting an Open Source Office

Twitter recently created an Open Source Office. Throughout this adventure, many lessons were learned and should be shared.
Business 2013-01-22 22:25:05 +0000
Chris Aniszczyk

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* 5 Easy Pieces: "Rabid Prototyping" With "Physical Computing" and Other Dirty Tricks.

Magic Windows, Football Field Style Bicycle Race Clocks, Talking Coffee Cups, Space Invaders Style Video Games, and A War On Christmas Lights.
Hacks
Donald Davis

* A Tangled Tale

Forum-based interactive learning is an important open tech community activity. We will look at a storytelling-based example from the past.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Data Science in the Open

Data Science promises to transform ubiquitous and cheap data into insights with the potential for great social, scientific and personal value. I will provide a lightning tour of high level theory, concepts, and tools to extract knowledge and value from data.
Cooking
John Taylor

* Growing Food with Open Source

Open source folks are naturally lazy. Anything mundane task they can automate, they will. So what does an open source developer do when faced with planning, planting, and tediously watering a garden? Automate!
Hacks
Sarah Sharp

* Hacker Dojo: Anarchy with Respect

Imagine an open source project was an actual place: a place where people volunteer to make something better; contribute their time, knowledge and resources; a place to share ideas or just to get work done. Hacker Dojo is for hackers and thinkers and this session will describe how the open source ethos can successfully be applied to a physical space.
Culture
Kitt Hodsden

* Hardware/Software Integration with Txtzyme

Hardware running Txtzyme will play well with the shell and other interactive environments. We'll explain the Txtzyme language and show hardware integration examples using bash, perl, ruby, java and javascript.
Hacks
Ward Cunningham

* How to Ask for Money

Have a project that just needs some cash to get off the ground? Need someone to fund beer and food for an event? Have a great idea and want to get paid for implementing it? Come find out how we did it.
Business
Selena Deckelmann, J Chris Anderson, Teyo Tyree

* Kick Asana

"Yoga for Geeks", sometimes known as "Yoga for Long-Haul Travelers", returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Law is Code, and We're Here to Open Source It

Anyone can show how to save the world. We tell how to receive unsolicited love letters while doing it.
Culture
Robb Shecter, Lisa Hackenberger

* Law is Code, and We're Here to Open Source It

Anyone can show how to save the world. We tell how to receive unsolicited love letters while doing it.
Culture
Robb Shecter, Lisa Hackenberger

* Learn Open Source Skills Without Embarrassing Yourself

New contributors are often intimidated the first time they appear in public to share a tarball, submit a patch, or open an IRC client. What if they could practice within "training levels" for open source contribution? This talk introduces the OpenHatch training missions, an open-source, interactive, entertaining way to learn the tools and culture of our community.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* No More Joins

Everything you learned about database modeling is wrong. At least for document databases like CouchDB and MongoDB. Learn about these differences, the trade-offs, the use cases, and put it all in practice in a discussion about a real-life document database problem. Unlearn SQL habits and relax.
Cooking
Nuno Job, J Chris Anderson, Roger Bodamer

* Open Source: Open to whom?

What makes the culture of open source so hostile to women and how can we as individuals act to change it?
Culture
Valerie Aurora

* Open Source: Saving the World

Most of us get involved with open source as a way to solve the problems we face on a day-to-day basis. But technology in general, and open source software in particular, also provides the key to solving the more catastrophic problems that people face around the world today.
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* So, You Want to Make a Map?

Practical cartographic geekery for accidental and padawan mapmakers: a crash course in Mapping 101 where we'll talk about the anatomy of maps and what you need to know when creating them. Topics include cartographic standards, projections, visualization, and the fine art of finding, deciphering, and using geodata and metadata. Included will be examples of the good, the bad, and the ugly, as well as resources for further exploration.
Chemistry
Sarah Beecroft, Darrell Fuhriman

* The Independent Software Developer

So you love open source? Spend more time doing what you love: go into business for yourself.
Business
Peat Bakke

* User, User, Who Art Thou?

What's going on in the mind of the user as they use your system? Did they choose it, or was it chosen for them? Do they like it or hate it? How can you tell? This talk discusses the types of users that exist, and their motivations.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson

Favorite proposals for this user

* Community Source in EDU: Open Source Education

How are educational institutions working together to build technologies tailored to their needs and combine resources using open practices? Learn from examples in courseware (eg, Sakai), multimedia (eg, Opencast Matterhorn), and administrative systems (eg, Kuali).
Culture 2011-03-30 20:34:11 +0000
Nathan Angell

* Creepers, Zombies, and Skeletons: Minecraft and open-source

A trek through the history of Minecraft and what we can learn from its interaction with open-source communities
Culture 2011-03-18 20:20:37 +0000
Corbin Simpson

* GovHub - Sustainable open source projects through government bids

Much of the difficulty for open source developers who try to work on civic or government apps is getting past the RFP process and convincing analysts and procurement officers that their projects have long term value and support. We hope to supply details on how to find and respond to the RFP process as well hints on how to work outside the process.
Business 2011-03-08 10:02:14 +0000
Greg Lind

* Licensing 101 For Open Source Projects

Just because software is free doesn't mean it comes free of any restrictions! Learn about several of the most popular open source licenses, their implications, and how to choose the right license for your needs.
Business 2011-03-30 15:59:39 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Not because it's cheaper: open source software proposals from the client's perspective

Learn about how to give a better pitch when selling FOSS to businesses and government.
Business 2011-03-15 22:03:17 +0000
JT Justman

* Open Source enables and enhances Green IT

With the world coming to terms with climate change caused directly as a result of our irresponsible use of greenhouse gas emitting technologies, there is a spurt of growth in making everything Green. While Green IT is in itself an industry these days, let us see how Open Source contributes significantly to enhance our efforts.
Culture 2011-01-20 06:30:15 +0000
Venkat Mangudi

* Open source, offline, custom mapping on the iPad

The MapBox team has been creating offline and mobile map browsing experiences that make it possible for users to better take advantage of geo-visualizations when working in the field. This presentation will focus specifically on the development of the MapBox iPad application, looking at the use cases that drove its development and the open source software stack that made it possible.
Cooking 2011-02-07 23:29:31 +0000
Justin Miller

* Oregon, Academia & Open Source: Highlights from the OSU Open Source Lab

You’re likely already aware that the Oregon State University Open Source Lab hosts some of the world’s most high-profile open source projects, from the Linux Kernel to the Apache Software Foundation. But did you know that OSU Open Source Lab releases its own software, teaches university students about open source development and that we’re spinning up a testing cluster for open source projects?
Culture 2011-03-29 21:28:55 +0000
Jeff Sheltren

* Personal Publishing: Curating a Fire hydrant down to a trickle

For years now I have consumed a large amount of feeds in Google Reader. I have also been creating my own content. I have had to build a number of tools to publish the way I want. In my talk I can talk about my system, and how others can build something like it.
Hacks 2011-01-20 06:35:43 +0000
Alex Kessinger

* Running an Open Source Project in a Closed Source Community

How do you go about building an open source project in a community known for waiting on the Mothership to bless them with new code?
Culture 2011-02-17 07:57:21 +0000
John Sheehan

* Small business koans

Master Foss said: “A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.” This talk will cover koans for small, open source business enlightenment.
Business 2011-03-16 05:43:23 +0000
Jacinta Richardson

* The Culture of Open Source Beyond Technology

Community building is tough--whether it's in real-life or online. Applying the principles of open source to your community building efforts can accelerate your success. This session will focus on the successes and failures of community building on opensource.com and highlight the culture of exploring open source beyond technology.
Culture 2011-03-03 05:27:51 +0000
Jason Hibbets

* The Open Data Protocol - Why Open Relational Data Matters

OData - Open Data Protocol - Why it matters.
Cooking 2011-02-04 23:51:27 +0000
Shawn Wildermuth

* The Story of Spaz: How to Give Away Everything, Make No Money, and Still Win

What motivates us as developers? How do we define success? Throughout the development of Spaz, we've learned a lot about what works, what doesn't, and what really matters. Come to hear the story, and participate in the discussion of how we define success in open source.
Culture 2011-01-19 19:05:28 +0000
Edward Finkler

* Wanted: Technical Cofounders

Technical cofounders are the life-blood of many new startups. Discover what entrepreneurs need and how you can get a piece of tomorrow's biggest companies.
Business 2011-01-31 16:21:14 +0000
Pinky Gonzales

* We should own our communications infrastructure, right?

As events in Egypt have shown dramatically, networks aren't always managed in the interests of their users. The actors might look different here in the US, but the effect isn't all that different.
Culture 2011-02-03 22:07:50 +0000
Russell Senior

* What Gets Thrown Under The Bridge?

Why not have a Salon des Refuses?
Culture 2011-04-01 06:47:58 +0000
Donald Davis