Tim Chevalier's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Build your own exobrain

Online services like "If This Then That" (IFTTT) are great for automating your life. However they provide limited ways for the end-user to add their own services, and often require credentials that one may normally wish to keep secret. The 'exobrain' project allows for service integration and extension on a machine *you* control.
Cooking
Paul Fenwick

* Civilizing IRC and forums: moderation strategies for mutual respect

As a project's public IRC channel or forum grows, it's hard to keep it friendly. People get frustrated with each other, people have "different" senses of humor, disagreements escalate...oh goodness, it can be a mess. This isn't great for retaining community members or welcoming new ones. I'll share my strategies for dealing with problems, learned at the scale of hundreds of forum threads, tens of thousands of forum visitors, and dozens of IRC chatters every day.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Freedom, security and the cloud

Cloud hosting is cheap. Cloud hosting is easy. What compromises are you making when you deploy to the cloud, both in terms of your security and in terms of your dependency on proprietary software?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* Hacking In-Group Bias for Fun and Profit

Our lives and social interactions are governed by sociology and psychology. As geeks, we strive to understand how the technology around us works, and we strive to find ways to make it better. Society is basically one big, complex piece of technology, and, like all technology, it is hackable. This talk will explain how you can do that.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* History of Concurrency

With new languages like Dart, Go, and Rust coming with powerful concurrency primitives (and languages like C# & Java adding more concurrency features), it's important to know where these ideas come from and where concurrency handling is headed.
Chemistry
Michael Schurter

* How I Learned Haskell by Writing Tiny Games

Earlier this year, I started teaching myself Haskell by using it to write short, text-based games. In this session I'll share what I learned, both about Haskell and about learning new things.
Hacks
Moss Collum

* Introduction to Scala

Scala is an up-and-coming language, used by companies like Twitter and LInkedIn. This talk will give an overview of Scala and introduce basic language features.
Chemistry
Todd Lisonbee

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Knitting for programmers

Yeah, you've seen us knitting during talks. I promise we're paying more attention than the people with their laptops open. Well, now learn how we do what we do... the programmer way. I'll start with the topology of individual stitches and go through geometry to design patterns, and by the end of it you'll know how to knit a sweater.
Hacks
Alex Bayley

* Life-Hacking and Personal Time Management for the Rest of Us

Almost all the books and articles out there about taking Agile methods into your personal life seem geared to people who have control over their schedules. What about those of us who have childcare, eldercare, or other incompressible schedule demands?
Hacks
H. Waterhouse

* Open Source is Not Enough: The Importance of Algorithm Transparency

Opaque algorithms increasingly control our access to information, on the web and beyond. Why is that a problem, and what can we do about it?
Culture
Rachel Shadoan

* Open Sourcing Mental Illness: Ending The Stigma

An open, honest discussion of mental illness from the perspective of a web developer. We can learn to survive, cope, and thrive.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Speaker Support of Awesomeness: How I went from stage fright to stage presence and want to help others do the same.

Once upon a time, I was terrified of public speaking. I went from having stage fright to being a stage presence who speaks at conferences. I run a support group for old and new speakers called the "Tech Conf Speaker Support of Awesomeness." I want to talk about what we do, why we do it, and how well it's worked out so far. This talk is about speaking for the first time, improving your talks, and how conference organizers and attendees can help too.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Stop Crying in the Bathroom and Start Your Own Business

The tech industry has a 'diversity problem' and companies are courting women, people of color and other marginalized people as the pressure mounts to hire someone besides 24-year-old cis, straight white male programmers. However, for many marginalized people, working in startups, agencies, and large tech companies can be a miserable, demoralizing experience that literally results in crying in the bathroom. There's more to life than startups. Come hear ideas for making your own path in the tech industry, without compromising your dignity or your mental health.
Business
Kronda Adair

* The Case for Junior Developers

Are you passionate about building tech, but think there is no place in your organization for junior developers? Come explore the true costs and benefits of hiring junior developers and see how you can improve your company while helping juniors become the best developers they can be.
Culture
Shawna Scott

* The Keys to Working Remotely

When I tell people I work from home, they tend to assume I spend the day playing with my dog outside. It's beyond comprehension to most that I actually spend as much time working as they do, sometimes more. I hope to enlighten those close-minded people about the possibilities working from home offers and how to do it well. Session slides: http://www.carsonshold.com/talks/keys-to-working-remotely/
Culture
Carson Shold

* The Outreach Program for Women: what works & what's next

We've mentored and interned in the Outreach Program for Women, and we know it works -- it improves the gender balance inside open source communities. We'll discuss why it works, how it builds off of Google Summer of Code, and discuss replicating it, expanding it, and looking at the next step in the recruiting and inclusion pipeline.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Liz Henry

* The Promise of Collaborative Magic

Open source thrives on the idea of people helping one another in reaching their project's goals. But is it working the way that it's supposed to be? This session hopes to discuss the importance of constructive collaboration in our communities, how we encourage them, and what we can do if they're not working out the way they're supposed to.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Towards more diversity-friendly social networks

How can we make social networks more "diversity-friendly"? It starts with an anti-oppression attitude, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and includes the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments, and will include an annotated collection of resources on the wiki.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Deborah Pierce

* Utilizing open source medical systems to reach the next 33 million

There is an increase in double burden of diseases in developing countries accruing from the rise of non communicable and infectious diseases. This situation is worsened by lack of adequate financing, inadequate infrastructure for delivering health care, low health literacy and inadequate personnel. Health information systems drive the global health agenda , and huge investments are continuously being made to bridge the digital divide to improve health care delivery. 1. What are the opportunities to effectively deploy open source technologies in developing countries? 2. How do we create ownership, partnerships and collaborations that support scaling open source medical records system 3. What are the effective design thinking techniques that drive development of open source record systems
Business
judy wawira

* Write an Excellent Programming Blog

As a member of the open source community, do you contribute only code, or also words? Writing about programming benefits yourself and others. This talk outlines solid article structures, suggests topics to write about, explains how blogging about programming is special, and inspires you to write articles of enduring value.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

Favorite proposals for this user

* An Introduction to Dependent Types and Proving Your Code Correct

This will be an introduction to dependently typed programming, the Curry-Howard correspondence, and using your type system as a proof system for showing that your code is correct all done in the programming language Agda.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 00:58:09 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Deprecating the Password: Email-only authentication

Email only authentication as an open-source authentication alternative to traditional username/password authentication.
Cooking 2014-03-26 19:45:21 +0000
Scott Motte

* Developing open source projects and not being worried about making a living - an introduction to the idea of basic income

Contributing to open source projects and not worrying about making a living? What sounds like a dream could become true with an economic concept called basic income. The idea is currently debated in various countries. The talk will introduce the concept and outline the opportunities for the open source community.
Business 2014-04-04 02:08:29 +0000
Hannes Hapke

* DSL's in Scala

Scala is particularly suited for the creation of Domain Specific Languages. This talk will discuss language features in Scala that make it easy to create your own DSLs.
Chemistry 2014-03-31 03:03:46 +0000
Todd Lisonbee

* Effective Projects with Family and Friends

Always wanted to work on an open source project with family or close friends? We’ll talk through the joys and challenges, how to turn the latter into the former and create an effective working relationship.
Culture 2014-04-02 02:56:39 +0000
Catriona Buhayar, Bill Madill

* Fix Code, Delete Docs

Educators, authors, and co-workers are constantly demanding more code comments and documentation, yet none of them ever update it. The comments lie, the documentation exists in three variants, and still nobody knows how to make the code do the right thing.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 08:03:19 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture 2014-04-04 16:50:29 +0000
Kat Toomajian

* How to win friends and influence people (while demo'ing your software)

No matter how cool your software is, demonstrating it to potential customers effectively takes focus and a lot of attention to detail. This sounds like common sense, but the demo is part performance, part conversation, part clairvoyance, and part determination.
Cooking 2014-04-04 05:36:22 +0000
chris mccraw

* Open Infrastructure for an Open Company

Balanced is opening its infrastructure to the community, learn how and why.
Business 2014-04-05 03:28:45 +0000
Noah Kantrowitz

* Open Source Will Power The World

The next wave of technology startups will be powered by free software. Here's why it's good for business as well as the world.
Business 2014-04-04 21:09:02 +0000
Christine Spang

* OSS and SaaS - Friends at Last.

The Open Source community has good reason to embrace permissive licences and Software-as-a-Service now.
Business 2014-03-11 22:39:44 +0000
Matthew Heitzenroder

* Sharing is caring: friends, manage your resources!

Lots of modern languages help us out with automatic memory management, but for other types of resources, we're left in charge. I'll talk about some of the problems that can come out of poorly managing resources like files and database connections, and show you a few of the tools that language designers have given us to make this easier.
Chemistry 2014-04-05 04:40:05 +0000
Kamal Marhubi

* Systems programming as a swiss army knife

Why understanding some systems programming basics will make you a better developer.
Cooking 2014-03-28 03:12:24 +0000
Julia Evans

* Technically Pretty

Presenting as both technical and professionally-female is a difficult tightrope to walk. Join us for this talk on how to work your own style into something the suits will respect.
Business 2014-03-21 05:44:44 +0000
H. Waterhouse

* Three Pair Programming Games

Pair programming is a great technique for learning and collaborating, but it can be a challenge if you're not used to it. In this hands-on workshop, I'll use short, structured exercises to give you a taste of what great pairing can be like.
Culture 2014-04-05 03:42:06 +0000
Moss Collum

* Unsuck Your Job

There is no reason you have to put up with a job which is unnecessarily stressful, unfulfilling, or just wrong for you. You have the power to make things better. I'm here to show you how.
Business 2014-03-27 04:10:43 +0000
VM Brasseur

* What Are Computers, Really?

We'll take a whirlwind tour of the theory behind what computers do. We'll start with counting on our fingers and end with an explanation of why there are some problems where the laws of physics say "no, a computer can never do this". No mathematical background necessary.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 00:45:10 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Writing Tests To Be Read

Good unit tests can help ensure that your code doesn't break; Great unit tests can teach people how to use it. In this session, you'll learn some tips for making tests readable enough that developers consult them as documentation.
Cooking 2014-04-05 02:56:16 +0000
Moss Collum

* You can be a kernel hacker

Writing operating systems sounds like it's only for wizards, but it turns out that operating systems are written by humans like you and me. I'm going to tell you what a kernel is and why you should care. Then we'll talk about a few concrete ways to get started with kernel hacking, ranging from the super-easy to the terrifyingly difficult.
Chemistry 2014-03-06 17:42:15 +0000
Julia Evans

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Beginning Functional Programming in Scala

Have you heard about functional programming but not sure what all the fuss is about? Learn about the basic concepts of functional programming, writing functions in Scala, and the functional approach to working with collections supported by Scala's collections library. Learn about the benefits of a functional approach to programming even when you're not fully adopting a functional style. Scala is a language that allows mixing the object-oriented and functional approaches. No prior knowledge of Scala is required to enjoy this talk.
Chemistry
Michael Pigg

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* Citizenship Online: Open Source Politics

Online deliberation refers to applications which help communities make decisions. This varies from Exploratory deliberation, like Amazon reviews, where an individual makes a decision by consulting their community, to very structured Decision Making deliberations where a community needs to forge a single legally and logically defensible decision.
Culture
Ele Munjeli

* debugging without borders

Debuggers are great when you have intimate access to your codebase, server, and network. Sometimes, all you have is a web browser and some intuition, and you still have a problem to solve. What then?
Cooking
chris mccraw

* Dirty Tricks of Computer Hardware: What You Don't Know Will (Probably Not) Kill You

Ever wonder what you don't know about how your computer hardware really works? Do you tire of lying to your relatives that "gremlins" are the cause of intermittent data loss and blue screens, and not just a car from the 1970s? Let's take a journey into the wonderful world of wonky hardware and find out what can be done about it!
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* Expanding Your Empathy

I believe empathy is the core competency that is missing from much of the efforts to push the tech community in a direction towards more diversity of all kinds. Companies, communities and conferences cannot expect everything to magically change until they're willing to go deep and examine the systemic patterns and structures that keep underrepresented communities from feeling safe and welcome in the tech space.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Firefox Bug Rodeo!

Hands-on Bugzilla wrassling, Firefox busting, barrel riding showdown. Enter the dazzling gladiatorial arena of BUG TRIAGE with MOZILLA! We will make bugzilla.mozilla.org accounts, practice reading and understanding bug reports, discuss why and how to investigate and add information to bugs, explore searches and reports, and feel the glorious feeling of contributing to open access to information and awesome browsers for all!
Cooking
Liz Henry

* Geek Choir - Fast!

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hacking your Meatware: exercises you can do at your desk

You will learn about risks to your neck, shoulders, hips and core from sitting at a keyboard for hours at a time. Learn a quick 6-breath sun salutation, simple stretches, the need for regular movement. Discuss sitting, standing, walking, reclining. Simple, incremental, safe, easy.
Hacks
Kurt Sussman

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Labor, ethics and computing

An exploration of labor and ethics from various points in the life of a computer -- from the day-to-day software programming and hardware inside the computer down to the materials used in various components. Includes the implications for open source hardware and software as well as possible future solutions.
Chemistry
Cameron Adamez

* Literate Programming for the 21st Century

Knuth advocated writing programs for people, not computers. How does crafting code with literate programming play with quick iterative development? Example heavy session using org-mode's Babel project and progrmming languages with succinct syntax, like Scala and Clojure.
Cooking
Howard Abrams

* Low-Friction Personal Data Collection

Have you ever wanted to track your movements, sleep, what you eat, who you spend time with, and all sorts of other personal data? In this talk I'll describe the tools I've been able to successfully use to track aspects of my life.
Cooking
Aaron Parecki

* Mod your Android

Take control of your hardware by installing an open build of Android. Learn about what is involved in installing a third-party OS on your phone or tablet. Bring your own device to hack on in a supportive environment.
Cooking
Jesse Hallett

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Programming Is Debugging, So Debug Better

Debugging: The schedule destroyer, the confidence sapper, the mire in which thousands of working hours are lost every day. It's time to stop staring at those four lines of code, desperately willing the bug to appear. This session is about the philosophies that will steer you around bugs, strategies for dealing with them, and tools that can shorten a four-hour debugging session to five minutes.
Cooking
Yoz Grahame

* Running with Scissors: Open Source Team Dynamics

Team dynamics are tricky. They're different when you're volunteering your time, when you're working for someone, or when you're trying to build something and invite someone else to build other good things too.
Culture
Amye Scavarda

* Smart Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Using Secure Boot for the powers of good

Secure Boot is a technology for limiting the files that computers will boot. Used wrongly, it restricts user freedom and turns computers into appliances. How can we use it for real improvements in security without losing the ideals of general purpose computing?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* What Is That Process Doing?

We're surrounded by programs we didn't write. Inevitably they eventually do the wrong thing, or they just don't do what we need, and we want to find out what they are doing. Learn how to spy on the processes you run.
Chemistry
Greg Price

Favorite proposals for this user

* Write, Debug And Tests Apps for FirefoxOS

During this talk Schalk will go over all the bits and pieces you need, and have access to, to not only write apps but, also effectively debug and test your apps before submitting them to the Marketplace or serving them up directly from your own site.
Hacks 2013-01-24 22:44:48 +0000
Schalk Neethling