Jonathan Leto's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Advanced Git tutorial: Not your average VCS.

Do you know the basics of Git but wonder what all the hype is about? Do you want the ultimate control over your Git history? This tutorial will walk you through the basics of committing changes before diving into the more advanced and "dangerous" Git commands.
Cooking
Sarah Sharp

* Agile JavaScript Testing

With the recent surge in JavaScript popularity, and the advances in JavaScript virtual machines, serious applications can and are being built in JavaScript. As the sophistication of these apps grow, so grows the need for verifying that our code continues to work as we expect. We'll briefly cover the advantages of test driven development, the reasons for pushing it all the way to the browser level, and then explore the options for testing JavaScript, look at some examples, and then integrate the tests into our existing development workflow.
Cooking
Scott Becker

* An Introduction to Computer Vision

Learn about several computer vision techniques and how to put them together to form an entry-level object classifier.
Chemistry
Matthew Dockrey

* Android location services from social networks to games

Adding real-world location to mobile applications on the Android platform takes users out of the ethernet and into the world.
Chemistry
Don Park

* Assholes are killing your project

The strength of your community is the best predictor of your project's long-term viability. What happens when your community is gradually infiltrated by assholes, who infect everyone else with their constant negativity and personal attacks? This talk will teach you about the dramatic impact assholes are having on your organization today and will show you how you can begin to repair it.
Culture
Donnie Berkholz

* Bootstrapping Your Open Source Business

A panel on funding your business without VC, based on GitHub's experiences.
Business
Chris Wanstrath, PJ Hyett, Tom Werner

* bzr vs git smack down

Selena loves Git and EmmaJane loves Bazaar. And like all good nerds they've spent a fair amount of time talkin' smack about the other's version control system (VCS). Come see what the fuss is all about!
Cooking
EmmaJane Hogbin, Selena Deckelmann

* Clustering Data -- How to Have Fun in n-Dimensions

The amount of information freely available on the internet from sources like Twitter and Github grows every day. This gives us new opportunities to leverage the collective consciousness. Clustering is a wonderful method for finding useful information in large amounts of data. But it can be an intimidating topic for programmers without a lot of academic background. In this talk I will introduce and explain some practical techniques for clustering real-world data.
Cooking
Jesse Hallett

* Deploying to the Edge from CouchDB

CouchDB can serve standalone applications, which can be shared amongst users, putting the source code (and control) back in their hands.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Effective code sprinting

Code sprints are events where developers quickly complete coding tasks in a collaborative environment. A panel of skilled developers will share their experiences for organizing effective code sprints so you can better participate and organize your own. The panel members have organized and participated in over a hundred sprints (ranging from Django to JRuby) and used sprints as the primary way to develop community-oriented projects (e.g., Calagator). While most of the discussion will be about volunteer-run open source code sprints, many of the ideas will be readily applicable to improving development at your workplace. The panel will offer practical, actionable advice that you can use and answer your questions.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Reid Beels, Audrey Eschright

* Getting Started in Free and Open Source

"All That Glitters is Not (Only) Code - Testing - Localization - Documentation - Release Engineering - User Interface Design / Usability - User support"
Cooking
Cat Allman, Leslie Hawthorn

* How to build a successful open source software consulting company

Lessons learned from a successful open source consulting company. This talk is geared towards the open source developer who is considering starting his/her own business, and the entrepreneur who wants to grow the business by leveraging open source development methodologies.
Business
Nate Aune

* HOWTO earn an open source living without taking on investors or selling your soul

Earning a living from open source software? Yes, we can. Let's talk about what actually works (and what doesn't work) for building a service business based not just on open source software, but with an open source philosophy, drawing on real world experience.
Business
Brian Jamison

* Introduction to Parrot

This talk briefly explains the overall architecture of Parrot and teaches the skills needed to get started hacking in Parrot.
Hacks
Chromatic X

* Is the Web Down: a Practical Tutorial on How the Web Works

You click on a link and you can't get to your favorite web site. Now what? Is the web site down? Is it your connection? Is it something in between? How can you figure out what's wrong if you don't know how it works? We'll show you everything that happens after you click a link so next time the web site is down you'll know what to do to fix it.
Chemistry
Michael Schwern, Joshua Keroes

* Layers of Caching: Key to scaling your website

Caching is essential to ensuring that your website will survive a large spike in traffic. With so many different forms of caching, how are you supposed to know what works and why you should use it? The key is layering your site with several forms of caching.
Chemistry
Lance Albertson, Narayan Newton

* Making Twitter Suck Less With Perl

Spam is starting to infiltrate Twitter and other similar online communities. Learn how to use Perl to filter to garbage from the gold and search for what matters to you.
Hacks
Jonathan Leto

* My Grand Experiment: A Portland Women-focused Tech Group.

The idea for Code-n-Splode grew out of the Women in Open Source BOF at OSCON 2007. I'll talk about my original reasons for starting a women-friendly tech group, how the group is evolving, and what I've learned.
Culture
gabrielle roth

* Open Source Development - The Dark Side

Navigating the Darkside of the Open Source Development Community. A decidedly sarcastic and hopefully humorous look at the dark under-belly of the Open Source Development Culture.
Culture
Jennifer Redman

* Open Source Microblogging with Laconica

Microblogging lets people share short status messages with their social network. Public Web sites like Twitter, Jaiku and Plurk are wildly popular with consumers, but Open Source programs allow a distributed social graph and implementation inside the enterprise firewall. Evan Prodromou, founder of Identi.ca, will describe the Open Source microblogging tool Laconica and its uses in the workplace and on the Public Web.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* Open Source on the Farm

Most farmers don't use Open Source Software. Why not? Are there cultural issues? Are needed applications missing? Could Open Source Software be packaged better for farmers? Are there marketing and advocacy issues?
Business
David Mandel

* Project Management Should be Boring!

Many people see project management as the art of trying to please everyone and pleasing no one, while trying not to go too far over deadline and too far over budget. It doesn't have to be that way. Good project management can be so predictable and reliable that it's almost boring. Here's what works in real projects.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* Server Sky

Solar powered server and communication arrays in Earth orbit . Manufacturing, costs, environmental benefits, security, maintenance, and survivability will be discussed.
Hacks
Keith Lofstrom

* Social network supermarkets and how to defeat them

The open source ecosystem operates at human scale, and yet the most popular social networks today are mammoths, where an open source citizen has limited agency with little to no ability to change her environment. Furthermore, efforts like OpenSocial serve to further limit what independents can build outside of the major networks, culminating in a threat the very essence of what makes the open/open source community thrive: choice and marketplace competition guaranteed through the ability to fork.
Culture
Chris Messina

* Speed up that library when you can't C a thing

The problem: you're using a modern dynamic language not known for speed, and you've identified a bottleneck. Write it in C? Does that give you the shakes? There are other language options available...
Chemistry
John Melesky

* Tangible open source!?

A crash course in applying the principles of open source to the creation of real objects.
Cooking
Dave Rauchwerk

* Unit Test Your Database!

Given that the database, as the canonical repository of data, is the most important part of many applications, why is it that we don't write database unit tests? This talk promotes the practice of implementing tests to directly test the schema, storage, and functionality of databases.
Cooking
David Wheeler

* What's New in GCC

The GNU Compiler Collection keeps getting better. Learn about new functionality and nifty optimizations that have been added in the last couple of years and hear about what's on the horizon.
Cooking
Janis Johnson

* Write your own Bayesian Classifier: An Introduction to Machine Learning

Can you perform simple arithmetic? Do you know how to program well enough to open and read files? Then you can write a Bayesian classifier, one of the machine learning techniques for predicting categories, most famous for its use in spam filters. Let's demystify this impressively-named but ultimately simple process.
Cooking
John Melesky

* Your Shell History In The Cloud

Use Google App Engine to harness a lifetime of shell history from any computer with tagging, searching and annotations.
Hacks
Josh Cronemeyer

Favorite proposals for this user

* Perl is Undead

Everyone knows Perl is dead and Perl 6, that long-delayed second system design by committee mistake, will never be released, and all Perl code is unreadable, executable line noise... right? Real-live modern Perl programmers will prove that wrong.
Chemistry 2009-04-11 01:44:27 +0000
Michael Schwern, Chromatic X

* Securing Social with OpenSocial and Caja

Our real and online selves are quickly becoming synonymous with one another as we share more and more of our real selves with our online presence. As containers begin to expand the social web with implementations such as OpenSocial, security is quickly becoming a concern. As an open project, Caja meets that demand as a comprehensive JavaScript securer. This talk will explore the implementation of OpenSocial on the social web and why security considerations need to be integrated when creating open standards for this space.
Culture 2009-04-11 02:21:39 +0000
Jonathan LeBlanc

* Sensing Real Life in a Virtual World

An open hardware and software environment for the exchange of automatically sensed data between the real and virtual world.
Culture 2009-04-11 06:52:10 +0000
Brian Krejcarek

* SXSW Twitter Music Recommendation Engine

Every year thousands of individuals flood the streets of Austin, TX looking for the next great band. What can their Twitter messages infer about the popularity of bands.
Culture 2009-04-10 20:52:46 +0000
Chris Alan

* Why should you host your OSS project at the Open Source Lab

There are a lot of free hosting providers out there for open source projects, but not many offer the flexibility and support that the Open Source Lab has. Our hosting ranges from shared web hosting to fully managed servers to just smart hands support. We're here to help expand the open source community to the next level.
Cooking 2009-04-10 21:35:58 +0000
Lance Albertson