Chadd Williams's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Few Python Tips

Nothing fancy here, just several tips that help you work effectively with Python. This talk is licensed CC BY; please feel free to reuse it at your company or conference.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara

* Civilizing IRC and forums: moderation strategies for mutual respect

As a project's public IRC channel or forum grows, it's hard to keep it friendly. People get frustrated with each other, people have "different" senses of humor, disagreements escalate...oh goodness, it can be a mess. This isn't great for retaining community members or welcoming new ones. I'll share my strategies for dealing with problems, learned at the scale of hundreds of forum threads, tens of thousands of forum visitors, and dozens of IRC chatters every day.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor

* Deconstructing Open Source Contributions

Everyone wants to make contributing to open source projects more accessible and fun. But how do we do that? One way is to analyze past contributions to identify potential obstacles and opportunities for intervention and support. This workshop will use our own experiences as contributors to explore how the process works, using a simple but effective reflective activity.
Culture
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* DIY User Research for Open Source Projects

Open source is only about open code, right? Wrong. Interviews, questionnaires, quick usability tests, and many other research types all have a place in the open source development process. With a few easy steps and a set of scripts to follow, your community can make user research an easy and essential component of your open source project.
Culture
Erin Richey

* Generational Relay: Passing the Open Source Torch

People leave Open Source projects, and that's ok. Failing to plan for it isn't. How one community is recovering from the loss of its first generation and preparing for the rise of its third.
Culture
Eric Steele

* Get more contributors! Lessons from the Drupal Ladder.

A small contributor pool is a recipe for burnout and can harm or hold back your project. Learn how offering a structured approach for step-by-step skill-building can combat imposter syndrome and build community, thereby increasing the number and diversity of your project's contributors.
Culture
Rhys Fureigh

* History of Concurrency

With new languages like Dart, Go, and Rust coming with powerful concurrency primitives (and languages like C# & Java adding more concurrency features), it's important to know where these ideas come from and where concurrency handling is headed.
Chemistry
Michael Schurter

* Learning Open Source as a course in Africa University

PHP, MySql, PhoneGap, PrestaShop, Magento, Wordpress, Drupal.
Culture
Olainiyan Adewale

* Math vs. Mathematics

Most people got through their high school math classes by memorizing nonsensical statements and regurgitating them on command. If you came out of that class hating math, no one would blame you, especially not a mathematician. However, that class didn't teach Intro to Algebra, it taught Intermediate Following Instructions.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh, Jenner Hanni

* My Journey into Open Source Design

Becoming a contributing designer on an open source project is often tougher than contributing code. The pathways to designing for open source projects are often unclear. Using my own experience joining the WordPress project, I'll share how I think open source projects can make it easier for designers to contribute their skills.
Cooking
Mel Choyce

* Open Source is Not Enough: The Importance of Algorithm Transparency

Opaque algorithms increasingly control our access to information, on the web and beyond. Why is that a problem, and what can we do about it?
Culture
Rachel Shadoan

* OpenStreetWhat? Mapping The World With Open Data

Come learn about OpenStreetMap, a Wikipedia-like project with over one million contributors aiming to map the entire world. We'll talk about the project, the data, and how to do some cool things with it.
Cooking
Justin Miller, Rafa Gutierrez

* Power Tuning Linux: A Case Study

In this talk we will do a reality-check in terms of the power consumption on off-the-shelve systems running “out of the box” Linux distributions.
Chemistry
Alexandra Yates

* Random

If you want to understand randomness better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* The Outreach Program for Women: what works & what's next

We've mentored and interned in the Outreach Program for Women, and we know it works -- it improves the gender balance inside open source communities. We'll discuss why it works, how it builds off of Google Summer of Code, and discuss replicating it, expanding it, and looking at the next step in the recruiting and inclusion pipeline.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Liz Henry

* The Promise of Collaborative Magic

Open source thrives on the idea of people helping one another in reaching their project's goals. But is it working the way that it's supposed to be? This session hopes to discuss the importance of constructive collaboration in our communities, how we encourage them, and what we can do if they're not working out the way they're supposed to.
Culture
Josh Lim

* When Firefox Faceplants - what the fox says and who is listening

Ever seen Firefox crash and hesitated to press that 'Send the Report' button because you don't know what would happen next? This is what happens next.
Chemistry
Lars Lohn

* Who broke the code? Finding problems quickly in a quickly evolving opensource project

In this talk, we will overview the 0day kernel test infrastructure, an Intel project where the goal is to ensure the quality of Linux upstream and developmental kernels. The project runs 7x24 tests on bleeding edge code from 300+ kernel git trees.
Chemistry
Timothy Chen

* Write an Excellent Programming Blog

As a member of the open source community, do you contribute only code, or also words? Writing about programming benefits yourself and others. This talk outlines solid article structures, suggests topics to write about, explains how blogging about programming is special, and inspires you to write articles of enduring value.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* xmonad: the window manager that (practically) reads your mind

Many desktop environments try to be easy to use for the average user, but that's not you. You're at your computer all day writing code; you don't have time to waste _dragging windows_ (ugh!) or watching _animated transitions_ (yuck!). David Brewer will demonstrate how by using xmonad, a tiling window manager, you can bend your desktop to your will and control your windows with telepathy. Kind of.
Cooking
David Brewer

Open Source Bridge 2013 Birds of a Feather

Favorite proposals for this user

* Clonezilla BoF (Confirmed)

Clonezilla is GPL software for system deployment. It’s similar to Symantec Ghost or Acronis True Image.This BoF is intended for system administrators at Opensource Bridge to meet and discuss any ideas and issues about Clonezilla they might have.
BOF 2013-05-30 03:51:51 +0000
Steven Shiau

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* !done - Hacking IRC Bots for Distributed Teams

When our company was acquired we needed a way to see everything that was done each day all in one place. Teams were using different methods to do this: standups, written reports, emails and meetings. Nothing stuck. Done reports introduces a simple IRC command: !done. Team members say !done and what they just did. These !dones are put into a daily report. !done becomes a part of everyday at work, not a strained task that’s easily forgotten.
Culture
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* Beginning Functional Programming in Scala

Have you heard about functional programming but not sure what all the fuss is about? Learn about the basic concepts of functional programming, writing functions in Scala, and the functional approach to working with collections supported by Scala's collections library. Learn about the benefits of a functional approach to programming even when you're not fully adopting a functional style. Scala is a language that allows mixing the object-oriented and functional approaches. No prior knowledge of Scala is required to enjoy this talk.
Chemistry
Michael Pigg

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* Clone A Git Together Into Your Town

Git is used everywhere, but few structured communities or groups exist. Learn about the PDX Git Together and how to clone this community model into your town.
Culture
Duke Leto

* Come Make a Map: Completely Custom, Open Source Maps with TileMill

Map making doesn't have to be hard. Anyone can do it. And we'll show you how, using the open source design studio TileMill. Come make a map!
Cooking
Justin Miller

* Cool Features of the Z Shell (zsh)

Z Shell is a UNIX shell with a bunch of cool features. Learn about installing and configuring zsh with some of my favorite features.
Cooking
Michael Pigg

* Data & Applications Across the Void :: Distributing Systems

I'll be covering the technology that is now being used for the largest scale systems and how that technology is used, how it is connected, and how it keeps large volumes of data available for everything from genomic research, mass e-commerce processing or keeping medical data safe from loss.
Cooking
Adron Hall

* Data journalism

We're creating educational materials for the next generation of news-application developers to dig into open data and open government.
Culture
DAVID STANTON

* Database Change Management

Survey of Open Source Java based tools for managing database changes with emphasis on automation using dbdeploy, Flyway, and Liquibase.
Cooking
Todd Lisonbee

* debugging without borders

Debuggers are great when you have intimate access to your codebase, server, and network. Sometimes, all you have is a web browser and some intuition, and you still have a problem to solve. What then?
Cooking
chris mccraw

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* FirefoxOS

FirefoxOS is Mozilla's response to the problems that it sees with the mobile space. Walled gardens, platform fragmentation, and single-purpose SDKs in non-web programming languages threaten to close off the open web from the mobile space. In this presentation I will be covering the basics of FirefoxOS, and how it is the only mobile OS that answers to nobody but you.
Chemistry
Benjamin Kero

* FiveUI: Open-source UX tests for the common good

Testing User Interfaces is hard! FiveUI [1] is here to help. While FiveUI happens to provide a handy framework for doing headless and interactive UI testing; it is really intended for sharing tests and sharing a framework for executing them. FiveUI consists of a browser extension (for Firefox and Google Chrome), a headless batch system, and a set of UI consistency guidelines. The guidelines are written in JSON and Javascript such that they remain readable and understandable to human developers, without being tied to a specific application. The guidelines can be checked on an individual web page by hand using the browser extensions, or on an entire website using the headless system. [1] http://galoisinc.github.com/FiveUI/
Cooking
Benjamin Jones, Rogan Creswick

* Hacking the academic experience

When I was asked to teach Ruby on Rails at Columbia University I observed that a significant number of the skills required to become a successful professional in the industry are acquired on the job and aren’t being taught in school.
Culture
Emily Stolfo

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Leveling up in DevOps: the Art of Bad Shell Scripts

What are the core differences in a DevOps intern, a beginner DevOpsian, and a senior DevOpsian?
Culture
Emily Slocombe

* Literate Programming for the 21st Century

Knuth advocated writing programs for people, not computers. How does crafting code with literate programming play with quick iterative development? Example heavy session using org-mode's Babel project and progrmming languages with succinct syntax, like Scala and Clojure.
Cooking
Howard Abrams

* Low-Friction Personal Data Collection

Have you ever wanted to track your movements, sleep, what you eat, who you spend time with, and all sorts of other personal data? In this talk I'll describe the tools I've been able to successfully use to track aspects of my life.
Cooking
Aaron Parecki

* Metrics - What's your code actually doing?

Metrics tell us what our code and our systems are doing and how well they are performing. Proper instrumentation of our systems allows developers and sysadmins to have a better understanding of how code works in production settings.
Cooking
James Burkhart

* Mobile Sync, HTML5, and NoSQL

Mobile database sync helps insulate your users from unreliable wireless data connections, so your app feels faster, and is always ready when your users need it.
Chemistry
J Chris Anderson

* More Code, More Problems

Some people will tell you that you need a large, full-stack framework to do web development The Right Way. These people are wrong.
Cooking
Edward Finkler

* My First Year of Pull Requests

Open source folks are passionate about the tools they make and want others to get involved. Yet, in the past year that I've been developing software full time, I've seen a wide variety of responses from maintainers. On one hand, I've been inspired by the Travis-CI maintainer who followed up with my bug report over several weeks, on the other hand, my pull request to JDBC has lain fallow.
Culture
Fiona Tay

* PHP for Pirates: pillaging interactive debugging from Ruby and JavaScript.

It's sad that in 2013, var_dump and die are still two of the most common debugging and reflection techniques in PHP. Let's explore the state of interactive debugging in PHP, compare it with what's available in other languages, and apply this with practical tools and techniques which can be used today.
Cooking
Justin Hileman

* Pro Bash Development; Way Beyond Shell Scripting

All Unix/Linux users know a little shell scripting, even if they're unaware of it. Pipes, for example, are a part of the Bash/sh language. Bash/sh, i.e. shell scripting, is usually treated as just that: shell scripting. But if you're crazy enough, you can develop full-blown profession, modular, and tested (yes, tested!) programs in Bash. It takes a little finesse, but I'll show you how, and you just might think twice about using Bash--really using it--in the future.
Hacks
Daniel Nichter

* Programming Is Debugging, So Debug Better

Debugging: The schedule destroyer, the confidence sapper, the mire in which thousands of working hours are lost every day. It's time to stop staring at those four lines of code, desperately willing the bug to appear. This session is about the philosophies that will steer you around bugs, strategies for dealing with them, and tools that can shorten a four-hour debugging session to five minutes.
Cooking
Yoz Grahame

* Quick Cure for the Shame of Untested Software

As the founder of a company focused on software testing, I speak often to developers who admit in private: "Yes, testing is important... but we don't test." Reasons vary, but the basic problem is that testing is seen as too difficult and time-consuming with no apparent value for the effort. In this talk I hope to convince you that this problem is a false dilemma and show you how to get started testing software quickly and easily.
Cooking
Daniel Nichter

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

* Switching Teams: Moving an Application from MySQL to PostgreSQL

The true life story of switching database backends in our application.
Hacks
Julie Baumler

* Taming Your Inner Cowboy Coder - A Simple And Sane DevOps Workflow

Moving sites from your development environment to a staging or production server can be time-consuming and challenging. This session will provide you with easy-to-use tools and workflow to bridge the gap between development and operations.
Cooking
Greg Lund-Chaix, Evan Heidtmann

* Terraformer - Open Source Geometry for Javascript

Learn about Terraformer, an open source Geometry toolkit for Javascript
Hacks
Jerry Sievert

* The Perl Renaissance

The Perl Renaissance is in full swing. Join internationally acclaimed speaker and White Camel Award winner Paul Fenwick as we explore some of the most freakin' amazing developments in the land of Perl!
Chemistry
Paul Fenwick

* The problem with passwords on the web and what to do about it

Handling user passwords safely is hard, but replacing passwords on the web in a reasonable way is even harder. Really, this should have been in the browser all along. This is where Persona comes in.
Chemistry
François Marier

* Using Secure Boot for the powers of good

Secure Boot is a technology for limiting the files that computers will boot. Used wrongly, it restricts user freedom and turns computers into appliances. How can we use it for real improvements in security without losing the ideals of general purpose computing?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* What Is That Process Doing?

We're surrounded by programs we didn't write. Inevitably they eventually do the wrong thing, or they just don't do what we need, and we want to find out what they are doing. Learn how to spy on the processes you run.
Chemistry
Greg Price

* Where "Small is Beautiful" meets "Big Data"- Empowering Local Communities with Open Hardware

"The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed" - Author William Gibson Whether rightly or wrongly so, it has been argued that the "information revolution' has resulted in a wider gap between those with skills and access to digital resources and those who do not. The same can apply to entire communities where language, geography and cultural barriers have created a new world of "Have Nots". The growing civic hacker movement is making long strides towards eliminating the "silicon ceiling" effect, but thanks to the emerging practice of "open hardware" the "civic hacker" is joined by a new class known as the "maker"... The civic hacker is capable of great things, and already has enough of a track record to be proud of. But the hacker ultimately is, and should remain, part of a vanguard elite who like the Bletchley Park codebreakers of WWII possess skills of such value that the work of a single individual can have a direct impact on the outcome of a war (or election...) The "Maker" on the other hand represents a fundamental break from a passive society of consumers into something more closely resembling the small-scale producers and artisans on which the U.S was based on.
Culture
Andrew Jawitz

* Zero to root in 12 months / How We Mentor “Rock Star” Students

The OSU Open Source Lab (OSUOSL) and PSU Computer Action Team (theCAT) provides an amazing program for undergraduate students to learn about system administration. Many of our students have moved on and created their own successful startups and have changed the landscape of open source themselves. This session will cover how OSUOSL and theCAT mentor our students and create rock stars in the industry.
Culture
William Van Hevelingen, Kenneth Lett, Lance Albertson, Spencer Krum

Favorite proposals for this user

* crushing data silos with ownCloud

We are heading full speed into a future where a huge piece of the personal information of the world is stored in very few centralized services. This talk will discuss the problems of a future with centralized cloud file sync and share services and will present ownCloud as a possible free software solution.
Culture 2013-03-08 10:26:34 +0000
Frank Karlitschek

* Developing For the Cloud...In The Cloud!

We give an indepth introduction to the cloud based developers tool kit. This allows the developer to develop code in the cloud with the code (almost) never touching the hard drive.
Cooking 2013-03-11 15:00:34 +0000
David Duggins

* Driving Open Data - Dragging 20th Century Institutions into the 21st Century

Most open data comes from organizations that are already open, or want to be open. How do we access the massive amount of data locked in institutions with no incentive for openness?
Business 2013-03-23 06:20:53 +0000
Ryan Urabe

* Fluff: Collaborating to Publish a Fiberarts Magazine Using Open Source Tools

The handspinning community needed an online magazine; we're using open source software to make it happen
Culture 2013-03-24 02:59:06 +0000
Rose White

* Hacking Clonezilla!

Clonezilla is popular for system deployment. However, there are some limitations. E.g. the destination partition must be equal or larger than the source one, software RAID/firmware RAID is not supported, or the image can not be explored. So any workarounds for them? In this talk we will describe and demonstrate the workarounds about breaking the limitations.
Hacks 2013-03-06 04:16:14 +0000
Steven Shiau, Chenkai Sun, Yao-Tsung Wang, Thomas Tsai

* Janus wasn’t a bad guy: Solving real problems using a key-value store inside a relational database.

We demonstrate how we used hstore inside a Postgres database to elegantly solve the problem of generating solid business-intelligence from the dregs of emailed PDF and Excel files.
Chemistry 2013-03-11 20:18:46 +0000
Laurie Kemmerer, Dave Miller, Ravi Gadad

* Lessons Learned from starting an Open Source Office

Twitter recently created an Open Source Office. Throughout this adventure, many lessons were learned and should be shared.
Business 2013-01-22 22:25:05 +0000
Chris Aniszczyk

* Let's hack the web, 1 API at a time!

If you ever wanted to implement your own DOM API but were afraid, fear not! The power is within your grasp at last!
Cooking 2013-02-14 02:09:24 +0000
Jeff Griffiths

* Linux Logical Volume Management in 3 Commands

/var too small? /home too big? Want to try out a new file system like btrfs without repartitioning your disk? The Linux logical volume manager makes this easy, and I'll show you how to use it in just three commands.
Cooking 2013-03-22 20:21:07 +0000
Brian Martin

* MoSQL: When SQL meets NoSQL

I will present MoSQL, an open-source tool for mirroring data from MongoDB to PostgreSQL. I will argue for mixed SQL/NoSQL environments, and talk about my experience using MoSQL to expand the availability of easy access to data internally at Stripe.
Hacks 2013-03-17 22:57:48 +0000
Nelson Elhage

* Network Science for Fun and Profit

As data become more abundant, the relationships between data elements become more valuable. Network science is an interdisciplinary study of network representations which allow us to explain, predict and otherwise extract value from relationships in data. I will provide a brief overview of network science, with examples and illustrations using open source tools such as R, Gephi, and GraphChi.
Cooking 2013-03-22 18:04:49 +0000
John Taylor

* NoSQL & Big Data, The No “BS” Edition

A lot of companies are checking the NOSQL conversation box these days but end up getting confused by the sheer amount of information that is available on the Internet.
Cooking 2013-03-07 20:48:02 +0000
Sam Bisbee

* Old-school testing that is relevant today

What is an equivalence class? Imagine that you have a function that takes an integer parameter between 1 and 12. The integers from 2 to 11 are in the same class; you probably don't need to test more than one of them. 1 and 12 are boundary values, but they're at opposite ends so you should probably test both. 0 and 13 and negative integers all belong to the same class, "out of range". What other classes might be relevant when testing this function?
Culture 2013-03-09 23:02:43 +0000
Kurt Sussman

* Open Sourcing Book Publishing

You've got a great idea for a book. You write a publisher. You get accepted! Then you find out that they'll pay you $500 and a 10% royalty for your book rights, in exchange for your heart and soul over the next six months. You're crushed. Is there a better way? There certainly is!
Business 2013-03-06 16:40:03 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Sane Database Change Management with Sqitch

Database change management has always sucked. This talk introduces Sqitch, the SQL change management application that doesn’t suck. Come see how it works, learn the few simple rules you need to get the most out of it, and liberate yourself from the suckitude.
Cooking 2013-03-22 06:48:01 +0000
David Wheeler

* Survey of Percona Toolkit: Command-line Tools for MySQL

Percona Toolkit is a collection of more then 30 command-line tools for MySQL that automate a variety of MySQL and system tasks. If you use MySQL and haven't tried Percona Toolkit, come learn about some free, widely-used and mature tools that could make your job a lot easier.
Cooking 2013-03-09 02:32:32 +0000
Daniel Nichter

* The Case for Everyday Crypto

Personal encryption is dearly needed in an increasingly surveilled world. I will talk about the user experience problems and lack of education that prevent widespread adoption and habit-forming of secure communication and circumvention software tools.
Culture 2013-03-30 23:53:18 +0000
Wesley Chen

* The Fourth 'R'

As technology continues to grow at an increasing rate, why is our educational system stuck in a pre-technology age? Why is programming rarely taught even at the higher levels of schooling? Why do stereotypes of the isolated, nerdy programmer continue to linger, driving away smart, creative people from computer science degrees?
Culture 2013-03-24 05:17:42 +0000
Davy Stevenson

* The intersection of software and education (with discussion)

How do you build a better engineer? What tools and approaches are out there today? Where might we be going in the future? Presentation then discussion.
Culture 2013-03-22 03:50:41 +0000
Colin Dabritz

* The Social Web has become a Hostile Web and How We Start Fixing That

There's a bodega across the street from the loft where my partner and I live. To get there, I walk out the door and up to a crosswalk, there's a button that activates warning lights indicating that someone's in the crosswalk which I press, and then cross the busy street. I walk into the market, get a six pack of my favorite IPA, pay cash for it, and return home. Now, let's go shopping online! Here's a suggested list of steps for using a browser safely as given by the CTO of a security company. And this list only covers browsing, not shopping. # Uninstall client-side Java. # All browser plugins should NOT auto-run, instead configured to "click-to-play." # Install security and privacy protecting add-ons including Adblock, Disconnect, Ghostery, Collusion, and NoScript. # this list continues for several more steps... I'd also suggest installing some software that alerts you to unexpected outgoing requests your computer is making. And all of this before typing anything into the URL bar, or the search box (by the way, did you turn autocomplete off?) All of those steps are like having to put on body armor, hard hat, safety googles, and goalie pads just to cross the street to my local market. Worst of all, I have to understand the underpinnings of the web to see why I'd want to take those steps. Something's gone terribly wrong with the web.
Business 2013-03-24 00:22:42 +0000
Bill Humphries

* What Hath Von Neumann Wrought?

I've sub-titled this presentation "skeptical musings of a reluctant cyborg." I'm mostly going to talk about computational journalism, but don't be surprised if some science fiction finds its way into the discussion.
Culture 2013-03-24 03:38:55 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* What Science Fiction Can Teach Us About Building Communities

Helpful tips about participating in and building open source communities as told through examples of what we can learn about communities from science fiction.
Culture 2013-03-13 15:11:44 +0000
Dawn Foster

* Women & Computing

Before there were even computers to program women were making exiciting advances in computing. In the 1800s Ada Lovelace wrote the first computer program. She died before the computer was completed, but when her program was eventually ran it Just Worked™! The gender imbalance in computing is a problem. We all know software engineers are shaping the future. Women need to be part of the discussion.
Culture 2013-03-22 04:34:06 +0000
Jessica Lynn Suttles

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* <Your Favorite Programming Language> Loses

Every programming language ever created has some horrible mistakes: your favorite is no exception. We'll talk about some fundamental principles of PL design and how they fail to play out in various real languages.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Adventures in Hipster Programming: Solving a Math Puzzle Using a Genetic Algorithm Programmed in OCaml

I heard Will Shortz pose a mathematical puzzle on NPR on a Sunday Morning in January and I thought, "Hey, I can solve that with a genetic algorithm!" In OCaml. I'll show you how in this talk.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* Beyond Excel: Bringing Web Connected Science to… Scientists

Come learn how team Hydrasi is partnering with scientific organizations to combine Open Source technologies and give them tools they never realized they could have. We'll blend stories of working with organizations such as DEQ, NOAA, and the Army Corps with your own story to explore ways scientists can partner with techies to make the world a better place.
Business
John Metta, Bill Jackson

* Building a Visual Editor for Wikipedia

Why isn’t editing Wikipedia as easy as using a word processor? Want to know how to build a reliable rich text editor in a web browser? Learn about how we are building a Wikitext visual editor, and how you can get involved!
Chemistry
Roan Kattouw, Trevor Parscal

* Comparing Open Source Private Cloud Platforms

Private cloud computing has become an integral part of global business. While each platform provides a way for virtual machines to be deployed, implementations vary widely. It can be difficult to determine which features are right for your needs. This session will discuss the top open source private cloud platforms and provide analysis on which one is the best fit for you.
Chemistry
Lance Albertson

* Dark Arts of Data Storage: What's Your Filesystem up to?

Ever wonder what happens to your data between the write() call and the disk drive? Or feel the need to scrape your bits off the drive after an accident? If so, this talk is for you! Come learn the dark art of how filesystems work.
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* Design and Command Line Applications

Design has permeated our culture and our tools, but the software you're building doesn't have a graphical interface. That doesn't exempt you from thinking about user experience design! Learn how UX principles apply to even basic command line scripts.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Developing and Using Pluggable Type Systems

A pluggable type system extends a language's built-in type system to confer additional compile-time guarantees. We will explain the theory and practice of pluggable types.
Cooking
Werner Dietl, Michael Ernst

* Experiences from Building a Science Cloud with OpenStack

How to tame your OpenStack installation for a production environment.
Chemistry
Chris Hoge

* Firefox Crash Reporting: Using Big Data in Your Open Source Project

Learn how Mozilla collects and analyzes three million crash reports a day with Python, PHP, PostgreSQL and HBase.
Chemistry
Laura Thomson

* Forking and Refining Data on the Open Web

Github has revolutionized social coding but where does social data stand in relation?
Chemistry
Max Ogden

* Getting a Handle on Privacy and Security

When was the last time you read a Privacy Policy, or looked at self-signed certs in the browser? How about cookie management? I bet you have awesome passwords! Lets face it, the browser does little to help the normal user in understanding and managing their privacy and security. This talk explores some of those issues, looks at projects Mozilla is working on in the area, and hopes to get developers and user experience people engaged in improving the usability of privacy and security in the browser. Slides at https://speakerdeck.com/u/mixedpuppy/p/getting-a-handle-on-privacy-and-security
Chemistry
Shane Caraveo

* Getting Started with MongoDB and Scala

This talk is for application developers who want to get started with Scala and MongoDB. We will discuss how Gilt Groupe's engineering team adopted Scala and MongoDB. We will demonstrate how you can connect to MongoDB within a Scala application.
Cooking
Sean Sullivan

* How to Encrypt Your Content on Any Website: Privly

Privly lets you post content on the web (Facebook, Gmail, Twitter, Diaspora, ..., everywhere) without letting host sites have access to your data. Come find out how to un-send emails and manage your data across many websites simultaneously.
Hacks
Sean McGregor, Sanchit Karve, Jennifer Davidson

* How to Win Collaborators and Influence Community: Encouraging (& Not Discouraging) Novice Coders

Interested in helping others learn to code? How do you help give them a running start, without throwing roadblocks in their way? Come get better at helping other people get better.
Culture
Liene Verzemnieks

* Introduction to Linux Containers

This presentation will be of interest to system administrators and developers that want to provide isolated environments for production applications or test machines without the overhead of virtualization.
Cooking
Brian Martin

* Logic Lessons That Last Generations

In the 1980s, my grandfather reached onto the bookshelves of his cigar-smoke-seasoned garage laboratory and pulled down a three-ring binder that would change my life. Come hear how a 50-year-old introduction to binary logic has managed to stay relevant after all these decades, and what it means for our own efforts to teach and document technical subjects.
Culture
Ian Dees

* Machine Learning in the Open

Machine learning and data mining methods underlie many exciting products and services, but their underlying workings remain opaque to many, even developers. I will provide a brief tutorial on some of the most important concepts and methods from machine learning and data mining, with motivating examples and illustrations from open source tools. Particular emphasis will be placed on learning methods and their appropriate use.
Cooking
John Taylor

* Model Data Without Making Tables — A Pervasive Linked Data Stack

Want to be agile? Why bother modeling your data with a static table, declaring classes, and setting up mapping from tables to objects and finally to HTML and back again? The linked data standard presents a more powerful data model, and lets you use your website itself as a database.
Chemistry
Leif Warner

* Nginx, Overview and Deployment

As the #2 most popular web server, NGINX has gained attention because of its performance, scalability and ability to manage concurrent requests. What are the basics that every developer needs to know about NGINX? Why would you choose Nginx over some other web server? What are typical deployment scenarios?
Chemistry
Cliff Wells

* Open Education Tools for Mentoring and Learning

The internet is full of information. Some of this information was made to help people learn. A subset exists under open licenses. These open educational resources (OERs) are used all over the world for learning and teaching. This talk will cover what some of them are and explore ways they have been (and can be) used for mentors and self-learners--both as individuals and in peer-study groups.
Culture
Molly de Blanc

* Pro-Style Code Review

Code review is awesome. Do more of it.
Business
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Setup Automation with PowerShell: Forging the Weapon of One Man's War Against Manual Setup Checklists

Tired of VBScript? WMI? Batch scripts? Tired of scripting and programming in angle brackets and closing tags? Come and learn about the creation, design, and usage of Carbon, my open-source, PowerShell-based setup automation framework.
Chemistry
Aaron Jensen

* Solving Interesting Problems by Writing Parsers

What do you do when you have to parse weird message formats? You write parser! Or, in this case a regular expression. See how I make a moderately challenging problem easy for everyone.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson

* Supporting Oregon K-12 Education with Open Source

How a partnership between the Oregon Department of Education and Oregon State University is using open source technology to help Oregon's K-12 teachers.
Culture
Greg Lund-Chaix

* Text Lacks Empathy

Have you ever written a nice friendly email and gotten a reply that seems like they read a whole different email? Textual communication has special problems. This talk will help you mitigate them: ensuring that what you mean to say is what is understood; interpreting messages that seem totally out of whack; and increasing empathic bandwidth.
Culture
Michael Schwern, Noirin Plunkett

* The Style of Style Guides

When you code, should you indent 2, 4 or 8 characters? Where should you put the braces? What should your variables and functions be named? Is it worth having an argument about any of this? This talk offers an analytical approach to deciding which elements of style will benefit your code. We'll discover which is the "best style" and which is the style you should use.
Chemistry
Michael Schwern

* Thriving in Chaos: An Introduction to Systems Thinking

For centuries we have learned to solve problems with a linear approach. This originated with Isaac Newton in the sevententh century and assumes that everything in the world is connected through cause and effect. Systems thinking throws away that assumption and examines the universe as small pieces connected into a complex network. You will learn how a systems thinking approach can be used to create robust groups that don't have leaders.
Culture
Alex Kroman

* What Is My Kernel Doing?

Ever wonder what your kernel is doing? We instrumented kernels on both web servers and personal workstations, and then measured to see what they're doing.
Chemistry
Randy Appleton

* What the Hell Is Wrong with You People? Pushing Change Across an Organization from the Basement Office

You have a great idea, perhaps the best idea ever, but you work with a bunch of know-it-alls, scaredy cats, well poisoners and lazy asses. You need a project management cycle that praises, emboldens, listens and inspires. You need a project management cycle that works.
Business
Chris Chiacchierini, Chris Langford

Favorite proposals for this user

* Real-World CouchDB

Lessons learned from using CouchDB on real-world projects in a government setting.
Cooking 2012-03-14 13:13:35 +0000
Matt Woodward