Trevor Parscal's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Crash Course in Tech Management

'Programmer' and 'Manager' are two different titles for a reason: they're two different jobs and skill sets. If you have managerial aspirations (or have had them foisted upon you), come to this session to learn some of the tricks of the managerial trade.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Bring Out the GIMP, Open Source Art Programs and Their Value in Both Tech and the Professional Artist Community

We have come to a point where nearly everyone is expected to have at least cursory knowledge of graphics applications, and rather than shell out $650 for a program you’re primarily interested in using for editing screenshots many in the tech community knows to download GIMP and use that $650 to fuel their caffeine and online gaming addictions. Unfortunately this is not the case with artists. From the moment you enter art school you’re chained to proprietary applications and I know I don’t have to proselytize to you lot about that. So we end up with one group of people being paid to use a free program for the most rudimentary of tasks and we have a second group of people who could be exploiting the most bleeding edge features of that program, but who are instead spending money they don’t have on products they may not need. There’s also the option to pirate those applications, but that’s a whole other talk.
Culture
Cloë Latchkey

* Building a Visual Editor for Wikipedia

Why isn’t editing Wikipedia as easy as using a word processor? Want to know how to build a reliable rich text editor in a web browser? Learn about how we are building a Wikitext visual editor, and how you can get involved!
Chemistry
Roan Kattouw, Trevor Parscal

* Building and Testing REST APIs in Node.js

Learn about techniques, libraries and patterns useful for building REST APIs using Node.js
Cooking
Russell Haering

* Building the Open Source Battle Rifle

A look at the technical and legal issues surrounding home construction of firearms, focusing on semi-automatic AK-47 style rifles.
Hacks
Beth Flanagan

* Don't Fear Unicode

Unicode isn’t new, but it still seems hard when your starting at the beginning and haven’t even been told the difference between a glyph, a codepoint, a character and a byte. Every year there are talks and tutorials at conferences about it, but if you haven’t grasped the basics, you can feel frustrated and lost much too quickly. This talk will cover the essentials of Unicode, locale and how they affect things like regular expressions, reading and writing files and sending data out to the world. Perl will be the programming language used to demonstrate these ideas, but much of the content should be accessible to all programmers.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson

* Information Radiation and You

Building your company's status board is more than just putting charts on a screen - numbers are just data, whether you write out the digits or plot a squiggly line. Learn to transform your data into information, and let that information instruct you.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Keynote by Sumana Harihareswara

Sumana Harihareswara gave our opening keynote, "Be Bold: An Origin Story".
Culture
Sumana Harihareswara

* Keynote: Fear, Uncertainty, and Dopamine

Beer, cookies, psychopathy, happiness, regret—these are all things the world's greatest scientists have studied in detail. Learn how humans work, and how to get the most out of interacting with them.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Keynote: Open Source, Open Hostility, Open Doors

Jason Scott, a member of the activist preservation group Archive Team, describes how open source projects and outlook have helped and improved the achieving of the group's goals.
Culture
Jason Scott

* Open Source and Intellectual Property - Busting [some of] the Myths

"If it's open source, that means it's public domain, right?" "Well, it's fair use if you only copy 5% of it." "I know, let's get a trademark and then nobody can use our idea!" A discussion of common myths about intellectual property and how it applies to open source.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen

* Open Source Music

What kind of open source music can you make? All kinds! Let's get our feet wet and jam!
Hacks
Cameron Adamez

* Practical Lessons from Exotic Languages

Esoteric programming languages never really get the attention they deserve in the mainstream programming culture. We'll examine idioms from several exotic languages and explain how they can improve the quality of more common codebases.
Cooking
Corbin Simpson

* Pro-Style Code Review

Code review is awesome. Do more of it.
Business
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Solving Interesting Problems by Writing Parsers

What do you do when you have to parse weird message formats? You write parser! Or, in this case a regular expression. See how I make a moderately challenging problem easy for everyone.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson

* Supporting Oregon K-12 Education with Open Source

How a partnership between the Oregon Department of Education and Oregon State University is using open source technology to help Oregon's K-12 teachers.
Culture
Greg Lund-Chaix

* The Art of Open Source DJing

Conditions are rough for an aspiring DJ. More and more venues are starting to care if their performers have a license for their music, and the cost of software, hardware, and music is often more than they would care to spend. Thankfully one does not have to sacrifice on quality when replacing two of these with gratis components.
Hacks
Benjamin Kero

* The Style of Style Guides

When you code, should you indent 2, 4 or 8 characters? Where should you put the braces? What should your variables and functions be named? Is it worth having an argument about any of this? This talk offers an analytical approach to deciding which elements of style will benefit your code. We'll discover which is the "best style" and which is the style you should use.
Chemistry
Michael Schwern