Edward Finkler's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013 Birds of a Feather

Favorite proposals for this user

* Geeks and Depression: Blue Hackers BoF

Lots of geeks have depression. Come talk about what helps you overcome your depression, and learn about bluehackers.org
BOF 2013-06-11 14:35:27 +0000
Sarah Sharp

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Give me money" or "join me in doing this great thing"? A workshop on asking for donations from individuals

If you care about a project or cause, but fear adding individual fundraising to your business plan, come to this long-form workshop. By the end, you will enthusiastically seek out opportunities to ask for money and know how to build a strong community of support over time.
Business
Kellie Brownell

* Beginning Functional Programming in Scala

Have you heard about functional programming but not sure what all the fuss is about? Learn about the basic concepts of functional programming, writing functions in Scala, and the functional approach to working with collections supported by Scala's collections library. Learn about the benefits of a functional approach to programming even when you're not fully adopting a functional style. Scala is a language that allows mixing the object-oriented and functional approaches. No prior knowledge of Scala is required to enjoy this talk.
Chemistry
Michael Pigg

* Data journalism

We're creating educational materials for the next generation of news-application developers to dig into open data and open government.
Culture
DAVID STANTON

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* Leveling up in DevOps: the Art of Bad Shell Scripts

What are the core differences in a DevOps intern, a beginner DevOpsian, and a senior DevOpsian?
Culture
Emily Slocombe

* More Code, More Problems

Some people will tell you that you need a large, full-stack framework to do web development The Right Way. These people are wrong.
Cooking
Edward Finkler

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* Cloud Scaling: High Performance Even in Virtualized Environments.

Virtual hosting providers are particularly enticing for startups and new opensource projects, but they come with large and sometimes unexpected drawbacks. Learn what to expect and how to mitigate the worst performance issues you’ll face deploying your services in the cloud.
Hacks
Gavin McQuillan

* Geek Fitness: Your Body is not Just Transportation for Your Brain

Optimize your productivity by keeping your body healthy. Learn how to prevent 'laptop back' and RSI; extend your workday by taking care of your body.
Chemistry
Kurt Sussman

* How 5 People with 4 Day Jobs in 3 Time Zones Enjoyed 2 Years Writing 1 Book

Hear how a distributed team tackled a big project (a book about a large open source project) in our spare time. Along the way, we encountered tools, techniques, and working styles that may be useful to you in your own career—or at least serve as a humorous warning.
Business
Ian Dees

* How to Ask for Money

Have a project that just needs some cash to get off the ground? Need someone to fund beer and food for an event? Have a great idea and want to get paid for implementing it? Come find out how we did it.
Business
Selena Deckelmann, J Chris Anderson, Teyo Tyree

* Inclusive Design From The Start

More and more FOSS projects are benefiting from a formal design process. This is an opportunity to see accessibility as a design requirement and integrate into earlier stages of the project's cycle as opposed to the afterthought it often is. In this talk we will see what a design process that integrates universal design looks like, and open the floor to discussion about inclusivity in design.
Cooking
Eitan Isaacson

* JavaScript Up and Down the Stack

From the Browser to node.js all the way to the database you can use and share your JavaScript!
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* No More Joins

Everything you learned about database modeling is wrong. At least for document databases like CouchDB and MongoDB. Learn about these differences, the trade-offs, the use cases, and put it all in practice in a discussion about a real-life document database problem. Unlearn SQL habits and relax.
Cooking
Nuno Job, J Chris Anderson, Roger Bodamer

* Open Source: Open to whom?

What makes the culture of open source so hostile to women and how can we as individuals act to change it?
Culture
Valerie Aurora

* Parrot: State of the VM

Parrot is an ambitious and long-lived project that aims to be a VM for interoperable dynamic language implementation. We'll take a look at what Parrot's developers have been doing of late, what kind of awesome goodies we've plundered from the OSS world and where we want to go in the next year.
Chemistry
Christoph Otto

* Run Your Javascript Everywhere, with Jellyfish.

In a world where Javascript is everywhere; your browser, server, database, mobile device -- you want and need code reuse to speed up development. In order to do this, you need to know that code works in all the environments you care about. Jellyfish is a node project focused on provisioning different environments and making it easy for you to execute your JS and get the results.
Cooking
Adam Christian

* Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls

Developing more effective habits isn't just for the good guys. We'll discuss seven methodologies that make trolls more effective---and tell you what you can do about it.
Culture
Bart Massey, Selena Deckelmann, Duke Leto

* Similar, But Not The Same: Designing Projects Around Three Open Datasets

The traits of an 'open' dataset -- factors like accuracy, geographic scope and copyright entanglements -- shape the development process in profound ways. I'll share what I've learned building projects around heritage trees, public art and poetry posts in Portland, and extrapolate a blueprint for evaluating and planning open data projects.
Cooking
Matt Blair

* Snooze, the Totally RESTful Language

As you can see we get a "403 Forbidden" in response to our "POST /integer/5/increment"...can anyone tell me why? It worked when we did "PUT /variable/x/let/integer/5" followed by "POST /variable/x/increment", so why can't we do it directly?
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* Technical Debt

Technical debt is something that most project teams or independent developers have to deal with - we take shortcuts to push out releases, deadlines need to be met, quick fixes slowly become the standard. In this talk, we will discuss what technical debt is, when it is acceptable and when it isn't, and strategies for effectively managing it, both on an independent and team level.
Cooking
Elizabeth Naramore

* Testing Antipatterns

Tests are great - except when they aren't. Learn how to avoid writing tests that are more trouble than they're worth.
Cooking
Matt Robinson

* The Current State of OAuth 2

If you've ever written any code to authenticate wtih Twitter, you may have been confused by all the signature methods and base strings. You'll be happy to know that OAuth 2 has vastly simplified the process, but at what cost?
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* The Independent Software Developer

So you love open source? Spend more time doing what you love: go into business for yourself.
Business
Peat Bakke

* Turning Mediocre Products Into Awesome Products

A holistic approach to design for people through sketching, product blueprints, and team overlap (used by Apple and others).
Business
Jeremy Britton

Open Source Bridge 2010 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* PDXPHP meetup / Details of HipHop for PHP from the source: Haiping Zhao of Facebook

PHP Meetup with Haiping Zhoa, Rasmus and others.
BoF
Sam Keen, Haiping Zhao

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Cloud To Call Your Own - Building Services On Open Nebula

Cloud computing, it's not all just hype! This presentation will highlight the benefits of an application centric view of infrastructure and operations and include a live demo building cloud infrastructure and providing services using Open Source tools. Starting with bare Linux images, Open Nebula will be automatically installed and configured on a cluster, while walking through the tools, architecture and resources you need to do the same thing.
Cooking
Andrew Clay Shafer, Keith Hudgins

* Being a Catalyst in Communities - The science behind the open source way

How does Red Hat have wild success with Fedora and other FLOSS projects? By following a method firmly rooted in humanism, practice, and science. Learn in this session how to be an effective catalyst in communities of users, contributors, and businesses.
Culture
Karsten Wade

* Building Interactive Displays with Touchscreen 2.0

Touchscreen is a platform for creating interactive kiosk and dashboard displays. It powers presentations for visitors to the Open Source Lab's data center and the network operations center. Come learn how touchscreen works and how to use it for your own display screens.
Cooking
Peter Krenesky, Rob McGuire-Dale

* CouchApp Evently Guided Hack with CouchDB

Learn to hack Evently jQuery CouchApps -- p2p web applications that can be deployed anywhere there's a CouchDB.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Drizzle, Scaling MySQL for the Future

Current state of Drizzle.
Hacks
Brian Aker

* Fixing SSL security: Supplementing the certificate authority model

The most common way of using SSL/TLS encryption relies on a public-key infrastructure that puts near-absolute trust in a large number of entities around the world, any one of which could accidentally or deliberately empower anyone to impersonate any site or service and spy on all of our communications. We've seen that these certificate authorities can make mistakes. We need new mechanisms to meaningfully double-check that they're doing the right thing.
Hacks
Seth Schoen

* Foundations, Non-profits, and Open Source

Should you start a foundation? Should you start a nonprofit? What's the role of non-profits in the Open Source community today? How can you be a good citizen in the Open Source arena with a foundation to support?
Business
Carol Smith

* Free Content for Good: Producing 30 Hour Day

30 Hour Day was the first web-based live streaming telethon of its kind, designed to raise money for local charities in Portland and beyond. In this presentation, I'll share my "eureka moment" when I realized that 30 Hour Day could be the lightening rod for smaller charities in local communities around the world to use our content to raise money and awareness. We'll also have a preview of the next 30 Hour Day (July 2nd & 3rd at Pioneer Courthouse Square) and how you can get involved!
Culture
doc normal

* HyperCard 2010: Why Johnny Can't Code (and What We Can Do About It)

Thomas Jefferson envisioned a nation of self-sufficient citizen farmers; programmers like Alan Kay and Bill Atkinson tried to help us code as easily as we might hang a poster on the wall. What happened to the HyperCard ideal? Have we settled for consumption over creation? I will explore the question through a case study, surveying the state of citizen programming in 2010 — from CouchApps to Shoes to plain-jane HTML5+JS to HyperCard 2.4 — and try to convince all comers that realizing the dream of the citizen coder is vital to continuing the ideals of open source.
Culture
Devin Chalmers

* iizip: Hacking together your own Dropbox

Dropbox, the leader in online storage and synchronization, is good, but not good enough. Find out how you can hack together your own equivalent that's more flexible, secure and convenient.
Hacks
Ben Dechrau

* Infrastructure as Code

Learn how to manage your infrastructure as source code - from provisioning to application deployment and everything in between.
Cooking
Adam Jacob

* Legal Difficulties Involving Open Source Companies and How to Avoid Them

The laws have changed and the open source community should take note.
Business
Martin Medeiros

* libcloud: a unified interface into the cloud

What is possible when you can consume servers on various hosting providers with nothing more than a python script? This talk will discuss libcloud, an Apache Incubator project dedicated to building standard interfaces into the cloud.
Cooking
Alex Polvi

* Listening to Data - Sonification Using Open Source Tools

Hearing your data - exploratory data analysis by way of algorithmic composition
Hacks
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Moonlighting in Sunlight – How to work on independent projects and have a day job.

Best practices for employers, employees and open source projects to coexist without legal conflicts.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen, Marc Alifanz

* Node.js and you

Node.js is one of the most exciting things to happen to server-side development in the last few years. Here you'll find out why Node.js is a perfect fit for your next project and a better fit than existing languages for modern web development.
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* Open Source and the Open Social Web

Open Source software has been instrumental in the development of every revolutionary communications technology on the Internet. The Open social Web is no different.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* Organizing user groups, a panel discussion

User groups are a vital part of the open source community. Learn more about how to start a group, keep it going, and make an existing group better from a panel of experienced user group organizers.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Jesse Hallett, Eric Wilhelm, Christie Koehler, gabrielle roth, Audrey Eschright, Sam Keen

* Puppet for Beginners

Puppet is a powerful configuration management tool that makes life easier for people managing systems and applications. This tutorial gives you an in-depth and hands-on introduction to Puppet that is ideal for beginners to Puppet and configuration management.
Cooking
Teyo Tyree

* Relational vs. Non-Relational

What kind of database do you need? Thanks to new database projects like CouchDB, TokyoCabinet, Solr and others, there are more non-relational database options available than ever for developers. Yet good information on how to choose what kind of database you need is still scarce. We'll cure that in this talk.
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* SELECT * FROM Internet Using YQL

Treating the internet and all its sources as a database, YQL seeks to allow developers to explore government, social, api and all other external data in a standardized way. Further allowing developers to manipulate this data and mash different sources together, YQL works to open up the web and all its sources.
Chemistry
Jonathan LeBlanc

* Sphinx - the ultimate tool for documenting your software project

Open source software projects can succeed or fail based on their documentation. Thanks to Sphinx, open source developers now have a "documentation framework" that provides convenient indexing and automatic syntax highlighting, integrates your documentation with your code, and can automatically generate a beautiful manual as a PDF document.
Cooking
Nate Aune

* The Fine Line Between Creepy and Fun

Social software is kind of a big deal right now. In the open-source spirit of transparency and dissection, let's talk about what makes social technology creepy, what makes it fun, and how to hack things to maximize your desired outcome.
Hacks
Audrey Eschright

* The Story of Spaz: How to Give Away Everything, Make No Money, and Still Win

What motivates us as developers? How do we define success? Throughout the development of Spaz, we've learned a lot about what works, what doesn't, and what really matters. Come to hear the story, and participate in the discussion of how we define success in open source.
Business
Edward Finkler

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* XHP for PHP

XHP is a PHP extension which augments the syntax of the language such that XML document fragments become valid PHP expressions. It fits somewhere between a templating language and a programmatic UI library. XHP allows you to use PHP as a stricter templating engine and offers a very straightforward way of implementing reusable, extensible components.
Cooking
Bob Baldwin

Favorite proposals for this user

* 'Open Source Business Models' and other mythical creatures

A humorous look at the taxonomy of Open Source ecosystems and the businesses that support/are supported by them based on one person's reflections and observations on a two years spent building an open source business and selling 'free'.
Business 2010-03-26 03:25:34 +0000
Andrew Clay Shafer

* CRUD for the Web: OData, GData, and You

Why do you have to relearn yet another API every time you want to really use someone's data source on the Web? It's time we moved beyond just consuming feeds -- we need full-function data access APIs! That's what the Open Data Protocol (OData) and the Google Data Protocol (GData) aim to do. Learn about these efforts, how they are used, and why you should adopt them for your next web API.
Chemistry 2010-03-25 18:54:32 +0000
Jason Mauer

* Data Visualization For Fun and Profit

How to improve your software (and your business) using a bit of math, some Python code, and R, the world's best free statistics software.
Cooking 2010-02-22 20:53:57 +0000
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Debt-Free: Technical Debt In Open Source Projects

Ship or fix? This choice presents itself to open source projects every day, and the consequences can be considerable. Learn how to control this "technical debt" in open source projects.
Cooking 2010-03-15 14:30:18 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Developing easily deployable PHP Applications

Talks about how to develop PHP applications that can be deployed on many different platforms with ease.
Chemistry 2010-03-15 02:09:08 +0000
John Mertic

* Geohacking: 2010 Edition

Here's a laundry list of tips, tricks, and hacks you can do with geolocation on the Web today ranging from the mundane to the insane. From viewing multiple datasets on a map to integrating GPS data into a video feed for simultaneous position tracking, you're bound to learn something to improve your stalking... er, I mean build better map-savvy apps.
Hacks 2010-03-25 19:04:19 +0000
Jason Mauer

* Grails for Switchers

Come on. You know you want to.
Cooking 2010-03-03 23:20:21 +0000
Matt Woodward

* Harnessing Java with Scala

We provide you an introduction to the Scala programming language through its powerful capabilities to integrating with Java. We will demonstrate how Scala can be an effective means of exploring Java libraries such as JAXB, HttpClient and Hibernate. We will show why Scala is our preferred harness, with capabilities beyond Java, Beanshell or Groovy.
Cooking 2010-03-22 03:19:50 +0000
Thomas Lockney, Trenton Lipscomb

* Javascript, the One True Language

JavaScript has long been considered a toy language, but new project focusing on server-side JavaScript the language could be the best choice for new development.
Cooking 2010-02-24 19:02:14 +0000
Stephen Woods

* Lessons Learned from Open Source Development

Two decades worth of lessons learned around open source development.
Culture 2010-03-25 06:56:50 +0000
Brian Aker

* Open Source IT Security: Tools and Tricks

An overview of current IT Security threats and the Open Source tools that can be used to protect, detect and remove them.
Cooking 2010-03-22 19:36:01 +0000
Jay Allen

* Please Pirate: Intellectual Unproperty

Information is *already* free! Renounce your rights! Please Pirate is an alternative to copyright.
Culture 2010-03-17 22:12:23 +0000
Peter Fein

* Put Down the Superglobals! Secure PHP Development with Inspekt

Inspekt is a filtering and validation library for PHP. With a focus on ease of use, Inspekt makes writing secure PHP applications faster and easier. This talk covers the Inspekt library and the "input cage" concept, best practices when utilizing the library, and how to integrate Inspekt with existing applications and popular frameworks.
Cooking 2010-02-21 03:16:33 +0000
Edward Finkler

* Real Time Data Stream Visualization

A customer calls with a simple question, "is everyone down, or is it just us?" Your stomach turns. "Uhhh, I don't know, can I call you right back after I check a few things?!" Don't find yourself in this uncomfortable situation. We have the technology to watch our data in real time in ways that make the health of our systems immediately obvious.
Hacks 2010-03-26 04:35:46 +0000
Tim Freund

* REPENT!!! FOR THE END OF THE UNIX EPOCH IS NIGH!!!

SINNERS!! HEAR ME!! For too long have you lain contented and SLOTHFUL in the illusion that time is infinite! SOON the UNIX EPOCH will END and numbers will OVERFLOW their confines CLEANSING all in a flood the likes we have not seen since 1901!!! The SINS of your 32 BITS will chase your children and your children's children unless you REPENT NOW and cleanse your code of the 2038 BUG!!
Chemistry 2010-03-26 00:33:39 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Security vs Usability vs Privacy

Within five years from now the internet as we know it will end. Freedom will no longer be a right, as it will be only available to those who know how to conceal themselves. The media landscape will have changed as well. But there is hope. For every step one takes towards Security one risks loosing out on privacy and usability. But there is hope.
Culture 2010-03-17 12:11:30 +0000
naxxatoe (Sebastian Graf)

* Should there be a free software app store?

Since free software "is a matter of liberty, not price", developers and distributions are allowed to ask users to pay for free software (though most users can easily choose not to). Musicians like Radiohead have experimented with asking, but not requiring, users to pay for music (by choosing their own price, which could be $0). What would happen if we did this for free software?
Business 2010-03-26 00:53:46 +0000
Seth Schoen

* Stoking the fires: How to sell your work without selling your soul

This presentation will compare and contrast the "open core" and "open complement" models with a third model called “open infrastructure” (evident in Linux, JBoss, Apache, and Subversion), in which infrastructure is open sourced as a platform for other companies’ commercial products.
Business 2010-03-24 00:18:26 +0000
Jack Repenning

* The Future of Mobile: Learn to Build W3C Widgets and Device APIs with PhoneGap

We know the future of the web is mobile, but what's the future of mobile? In this session, you'll learn how to step-up mobile app development with widgets and device APIs. Add these two technologies to your toolbox to begin building next-gen mobile apps today.
Hacks 2010-02-24 22:47:21 +0000
Brian LeRoux

* Theme any website in two hours with Deliverance

Imagine if you could take any website design and use it as-is with any website or web application? Well, you can with Deliverance!
Cooking 2010-03-26 03:44:12 +0000
Nate Aune