Jan-Christoph Borchardt's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2012 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Portland JavaScript Admirers user group meeting

Portland's user group for all things JavaScript and ECMAscript. The topic for this meeting is Unhosted: personal data freedom.
BOF
Jesse Hallett, Jan-Christoph Borchardt

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* 29 Ways to Get Started in Open Source Today

Learn how to get started in open source. You can help your favorite open source project, even if you don't think you're "a good enough programmer". You just have to know where to start, and here you'll learn 29 different starting points where you can pitch in and make a difference in the software that you use every day.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Accessibility in Mobile Platforms: Bridging Divides

Mobile devices are changing the way we interact with the web, both as media consumers and social beings. We will explore the opportunities and challenges this change brings to users with disabilities.
Chemistry
Eitan Isaacson

* Coordinating Usability Testing in Free Software

Freedom 4: The freedom to use the program effectively, efficiently and satisfactory. For a software to truly be free, people need to be able to easily use it without help. A primer to usability testing in a distributed and independent development environment.
Cooking
Jan-Christoph Borchardt

* Design and Command Line Applications

Design has permeated our culture and our tools, but the software you're building doesn't have a graphical interface. That doesn't exempt you from thinking about user experience design! Learn how UX principles apply to even basic command line scripts.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Easy Beats Open: The Challenge of Growing Open Source

"Open Source, in its majestic equality, guarantees both programmers and non-programmers alike the right to alter and recompile their software." The battle for Open Source Legitimacy is largely over: in many sectors, it's actually the preferred alternative. In the task-focused world that most casual computer users inhabit, however, "open-ness" is a meaningless abstraction and the walled gardens of closed source competitors offer compelling advantages. In this session, I'll explore the reasons that people make their choices, point out why "moral arguments" about open source are unlikely to change those choices, and discuss ways that our communities can further the ideals of Open Source without demonizing Grandpa's iPad.
Culture
Jeff Eaton

* From OAuth to IndieAuth: Own Your Online Identity

Sick of writing sign-in code? Not sure whether to support Twitter logins, Facebook logins, or both? Try IndieAuth! IndieAuth, built on top of OAuth, is a new way to sign in to websites online using your own domain name. This talk will show how OAuth and OpenID paved the way for IndieAuth, and will provide details about how to use this on your own websites.
Hacks
Aaron Parecki

* Future of Wearable Computing: Constraint, Context and Location

Google will release a wearable heads up display this fall, and it may help to usher in a new era of augmented reality and wearable computing. What does this mean for us? How do we build for the next generation of machines? Who was here before us, and how can we learn from them?
Hacks
Amber Case

* Getting a Handle on Privacy and Security

When was the last time you read a Privacy Policy, or looked at self-signed certs in the browser? How about cookie management? I bet you have awesome passwords! Lets face it, the browser does little to help the normal user in understanding and managing their privacy and security. This talk explores some of those issues, looks at projects Mozilla is working on in the area, and hopes to get developers and user experience people engaged in improving the usability of privacy and security in the browser. Slides at https://speakerdeck.com/u/mixedpuppy/p/getting-a-handle-on-privacy-and-security
Chemistry
Shane Caraveo

* How Not to Release Software

You've seen a million best practice talks. This is quite the opposite: I'll instruct you in the ways I've failed over twenty years of software development, and advise you how not to make the same mistakes.
Business
Laura Thomson

* How to Encrypt Your Content on Any Website: Privly

Privly lets you post content on the web (Facebook, Gmail, Twitter, Diaspora, ..., everywhere) without letting host sites have access to your data. Come find out how to un-send emails and manage your data across many websites simultaneously.
Hacks
Sean McGregor, Sanchit Karve, Jennifer Davidson

* How to Win Collaborators and Influence Community: Encouraging (& Not Discouraging) Novice Coders

Interested in helping others learn to code? How do you help give them a running start, without throwing roadblocks in their way? Come get better at helping other people get better.
Culture
Liene Verzemnieks

* Identity, Reputation and Gratitude: Designing for a Community

How is Wikipedia designing its user experiences? In a larger sense, how do you design for a collaborative community -- the type of social network where people make things together? Brandon Harris, senior designer for the Wikimedia Foundation, explains.
Chemistry
Brandon Harris

* Keynote: Fear, Uncertainty, and Dopamine

Beer, cookies, psychopathy, happiness, regret—these are all things the world's greatest scientists have studied in detail. Learn how humans work, and how to get the most out of interacting with them.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Open Education Tools for Mentoring and Learning

The internet is full of information. Some of this information was made to help people learn. A subset exists under open licenses. These open educational resources (OERs) are used all over the world for learning and teaching. This talk will cover what some of them are and explore ways they have been (and can be) used for mentors and self-learners--both as individuals and in peer-study groups.
Culture
Molly de Blanc

* Open Source and Intellectual Property - Busting [some of] the Myths

"If it's open source, that means it's public domain, right?" "Well, it's fair use if you only copy 5% of it." "I know, let's get a trademark and then nobody can use our idea!" A discussion of common myths about intellectual property and how it applies to open source.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen

* Open Source Music

What kind of open source music can you make? All kinds! Let's get our feet wet and jam!
Hacks
Cameron Adamez

* Rise of the Indie Web

Meet the pioneers of the new Indie Web, learn what's changed, and how you too can reclaim your content, your data, your online identity. Join our panelists as they debate a variety of different approaches and learn how you too can get started and join the new Indie Web.
Culture
Tantek Çelik

* Web Actions: A New Building Block for the Web

A web action is the user experience, code, and service for taking a specific discrete action, across the web, from one site to another site or application. You've all seen the buttons: Share, Read later, Follow, Like, Favorite, etc. More than any one social site or service, web actions are the emergence of a whole new hypermedia building block. This talk will give an overview of the anatomy of a web action, discuss web action user flow, and highlight best practices for both publishers and service providers.
Chemistry
Tantek Çelik

* Your Open Source Startup

Are you ready to take your Open Source project to the next level? Maybe it's time for a startup.
Business
Evan Prodromou

Favorite proposals for this user

* Back to Making the Future: Recovering from Data Addiction

Spending our time consuming data lets us get really effective at it, but every optimization has a cost. By optimizing for consumption, we sacrifice our ability to create.
Culture 2012-03-16 05:42:54 +0000
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Commercial, open source and community; is it an oxymoron?

Panel discussion on the viability and strategies around commercial open source communities.
Culture 2012-03-31 03:21:05 +0000
John Mertic

* Continuous Integration for the UI

Back end developers have been reaping the benefit of using build tools to build there code and report on possible errors for ages. With the evolution of the web, we front end developers needs the same...
Hacks 2012-03-13 19:49:19 +0000
Schalk Neethling

* Education and participation: students + open source projects = win-win!

In lots of lectures, students work on imaginary projects just for the sake of learning something. Or they can choose what they work on – mostly That Popular Proprietary Software™ which does not care about their contributions. We need to change that.
Culture 2012-03-31 06:48:56 +0000
Jan-Christoph Borchardt

* Emerging Technologies for the Web

Imagine a world where a users favorite websites are integrated into their user agent, becoming a continuous part of their web experience. If that were your website, what more could you do?
Chemistry 2012-03-16 19:39:14 +0000
Shane Caraveo

* Freedom from the web’s monopolies

The web is not as open as it used to be: monopoly platforms formed new proprietary layers on top of it. Apps always have storage attached to it, forming a package deal of »you get our app, we get your data«.
Chemistry 2012-03-31 06:57:56 +0000
Jan-Christoph Borchardt

* microformats 2.0 - the next evolutionary step for web data

microformats are published on millions of sites, providing a simple API for the data on those pages with no additional URLs, file formats, callbacks etc. Similar approaches have subsequently emerged and grown as well, like RDFa and microdata. This talk discusses lessons learned in all HTML data in general, and how those lessons have been incorporated into microformats 2.0, the latest in the evolution of web data.
Chemistry 2012-04-01 20:55:15 +0000
Tantek Çelik

* Mining User Identity

Identity and social grouping are foundations of how we understand people that come to our sites and products, yet companies simply stop at implementing a flat profile. We will look into the concepts of human identity through concepts like tribalism, while using identity data mining open source initiatives, to show how integrated identity can help you understand your users to a greater degree than ever before.
Chemistry 2012-03-08 17:22:30 +0000
Jonathan LeBlanc

* Open Source As A Career Move

When we talk about contributing to open source, it is usually framed as a sacrifice, an act of altruism. Yet those generous individuals seem to land the most fabulous jobs and build excellent companies. Coincidence or a great career move?
Business 2012-03-16 18:27:22 +0000
Lorna Mitchell

* Open Source: Saving the World

Most of us get involved with open source as a way to solve the problems we face on a day-to-day basis. But technology in general, and open source software in particular, also provides the key to solving the more catastrophic problems that people face around the world today.
Culture 2012-03-14 00:37:16 +0000
Noirin Plunkett

* Open-and-Shut? A look at Open Movements

Openness is now the norm in software, what will it take to scale other domains?
Culture 2012-03-31 06:39:09 +0000
Dhananjay Keskar

* Opening Open Source: Making Your Project Friendly to Everyone

Many open source projects run into the question: how do we get more people involved? How do we grow our contributors? How do we make our community more diverse?
Culture 2012-02-28 19:38:27 +0000
Pam Selle

* The Mathematics of Human-Computer Interaction

Why do most computer interfaces flop? Why do so few succeed? Is it magic, or is there a method to the madness? Learn about some of the mathematical underpinnings of human-computer interaction, starting with Fitts' law in one-dimension and ending with the Accot-Zhai steering law in two.
Chemistry 2012-03-14 22:30:54 +0000
Daniel Sauble

* Why Can’t We Just Make It Easy For New Contributors?

During this talk I'll discuss many approaches for making it easier for new contributors to join your project. Any project which makes it easier to bring new contributors on board will find its quality and reputation improving by leaps and bounds. You'll find it’s an effort very much worth making.
Culture 2012-03-16 04:24:56 +0000
VM Brasseur