Pieter van de Bruggen's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* !done - Hacking IRC Bots for Distributed Teams

When our company was acquired we needed a way to see everything that was done each day all in one place. Teams were using different methods to do this: standups, written reports, emails and meetings. Nothing stuck. Done reports introduces a simple IRC command: !done. Team members say !done and what they just did. These !dones are put into a daily report. !done becomes a part of everyday at work, not a strained task that’s easily forgotten.
Culture
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* Clone A Git Together Into Your Town

Git is used everywhere, but few structured communities or groups exist. Learn about the PDX Git Together and how to clone this community model into your town.
Culture
Duke Leto

* DIY: Creativity and Open Source

Panelists will discuss their uses of open source tools in creative applications, from design to art to hardware.
Culture
Melissa Chavez, Sarah Sharp, Cloë Latchkey, Cameron Adamez

* Expanding Your Empathy

I believe empathy is the core competency that is missing from much of the efforts to push the tech community in a direction towards more diversity of all kinds. Companies, communities and conferences cannot expect everything to magically change until they're willing to go deep and examine the systemic patterns and structures that keep underrepresented communities from feeling safe and welcome in the tech space.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* FiveUI: Open-source UX tests for the common good

Testing User Interfaces is hard! FiveUI [1] is here to help. While FiveUI happens to provide a handy framework for doing headless and interactive UI testing; it is really intended for sharing tests and sharing a framework for executing them. FiveUI consists of a browser extension (for Firefox and Google Chrome), a headless batch system, and a set of UI consistency guidelines. The guidelines are written in JSON and Javascript such that they remain readable and understandable to human developers, without being tied to a specific application. The guidelines can be checked on an individual web page by hand using the browser extensions, or on an entire website using the headless system. [1] http://galoisinc.github.com/FiveUI/
Cooking
Benjamin Jones, Rogan Creswick

* Hacking your Meatware: exercises you can do at your desk

You will learn about risks to your neck, shoulders, hips and core from sitting at a keyboard for hours at a time. Learn a quick 6-breath sun salutation, simple stretches, the need for regular movement. Discuss sitting, standing, walking, reclining. Simple, incremental, safe, easy.
Hacks
Kurt Sussman

* How to multiply small integers while <del>Markus</del> human

Thank you! I'm glad someone read the description of this talk on line and remembered to answer Aardvark -- if you hadn't done that, the excerpt wouldn't have actually been part of the talk, and the very fabric of reality could have been threatened!
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Pro Bash Development; Way Beyond Shell Scripting

All Unix/Linux users know a little shell scripting, even if they're unaware of it. Pipes, for example, are a part of the Bash/sh language. Bash/sh, i.e. shell scripting, is usually treated as just that: shell scripting. But if you're crazy enough, you can develop full-blown profession, modular, and tested (yes, tested!) programs in Bash. It takes a little finesse, but I'll show you how, and you just might think twice about using Bash--really using it--in the future.
Hacks
Daniel Nichter

* Programming Is Debugging, So Debug Better

Debugging: The schedule destroyer, the confidence sapper, the mire in which thousands of working hours are lost every day. It's time to stop staring at those four lines of code, desperately willing the bug to appear. This session is about the philosophies that will steer you around bugs, strategies for dealing with them, and tools that can shorten a four-hour debugging session to five minutes.
Cooking
Yoz Grahame

* Running with Scissors: Open Source Team Dynamics

Team dynamics are tricky. They're different when you're volunteering your time, when you're working for someone, or when you're trying to build something and invite someone else to build other good things too.
Culture
Amye Scavarda

* Simple Questions Should Have Simple Answers

What happens when a project begins to embrace the philosophy that simple questions should have simple answers? Q: Simple to whom? A: Simple to the person asking the question. "Simple questions should have simple answers" has given me a lot of design clarity in my projects. I hope to convince you of its beneficial effects.
Culture
Michael Schwern

* The Future of Ruby

What will Ruby, the programming language and community, look like in 2 years?
Culture
Brian Shirai

Favorite proposals for this user

* A Geek's Guide to Race Walking

"It's like the gods descending from Mt. Olympus!" Okay, so your reaction to seeing race walkers might not be as dramatic as Hal's on "Malcolm in the Middle." But from the unconventional gait to the plethora of statistics, there's plenty about this sport to delight geeks. In this session, we'll tell you all about it.
Culture 2013-02-27 19:05:07 +0000
Carmen Jackinsky, Ian Dees

* Conference Presentation Mind Control

Have you been at a talk which sounded great on paper, but was lackluster in delivery? Have you discovered that some presenters can seem to make *anything* interesting? Do you want to know how to hack audiences to convince them that your talk is *freakin' amazing* even though it's content-challenged? Want to use your conference presentation skills to kickstart your career in world domination? BYO tinfoil hat.
Hacks 2013-03-10 05:06:32 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Emotional barriers to getting stuff done

Sometimes you know exactly how to solve a problem, but yet you can't get started. Why is this, and what can you do about it.
Chemistry 2013-03-24 01:42:00 +0000
Daniel Johnson

* Geek Choir - Extended!

An extended, hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture 2013-03-24 02:30:00 +0000
Michael Alan Brewer

* Highly Functional Programming (with a Semblance of Reason)

Functional programming is procedural programming without the imperative. Wolf eats the lambda.
Chemistry 2013-03-23 22:41:25 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* Let's make programming ridiculously easy

(But why stop there?)
Hacks 2013-03-11 21:55:43 +0000
Joseph Corneli

* TeleHash - Replacing REST APIs With a Messaging-Passing DHT for Apps

The age of REST is in full swing for building a modern app but it's starting to show strain: increased development complexity across multiple APIs, managing state in mobile apps, and a reliance on centralizing services to solve problems.
Chemistry 2013-03-20 19:39:51 +0000
Jeremie Miller

* The Dream-Quest of libgit2

libgit2 is Git re-imagined as thread-safe library instead of a collection of command-line scripts, possibly written by the Elder Gods themselves. This talk will describe why that is so important and the various technologies it will enable in the near future in embedded and mobile devices.
Chemistry 2013-03-22 01:34:06 +0000
Duke Leto

* The Fourth 'R'

As technology continues to grow at an increasing rate, why is our educational system stuck in a pre-technology age? Why is programming rarely taught even at the higher levels of schooling? Why do stereotypes of the isolated, nerdy programmer continue to linger, driving away smart, creative people from computer science degrees?
Culture 2013-03-24 05:17:42 +0000
Davy Stevenson

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* <Your Favorite Programming Language> Loses

Every programming language ever created has some horrible mistakes: your favorite is no exception. We'll talk about some fundamental principles of PL design and how they fail to play out in various real languages.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Coordinating Usability Testing in Free Software

Freedom 4: The freedom to use the program effectively, efficiently and satisfactory. For a software to truly be free, people need to be able to easily use it without help. A primer to usability testing in a distributed and independent development environment.
Cooking
Jan-Christoph Borchardt

* Design and Command Line Applications

Design has permeated our culture and our tools, but the software you're building doesn't have a graphical interface. That doesn't exempt you from thinking about user experience design! Learn how UX principles apply to even basic command line scripts.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Developing and Using Pluggable Type Systems

A pluggable type system extends a language's built-in type system to confer additional compile-time guarantees. We will explain the theory and practice of pluggable types.
Cooking
Werner Dietl, Michael Ernst

* Dread Free Continuous Deployment Using Dreadnot

Learn how to use Dreadnot, an open source deployment orchestration tool creating using Node.js and Twitter Bootstrap, to integrate with a variety of integration and infrastructure tools to enable rolling deployments with the click of a button.
Cooking
Russell Haering

* From OAuth to IndieAuth: Own Your Online Identity

Sick of writing sign-in code? Not sure whether to support Twitter logins, Facebook logins, or both? Try IndieAuth! IndieAuth, built on top of OAuth, is a new way to sign in to websites online using your own domain name. This talk will show how OAuth and OpenID paved the way for IndieAuth, and will provide details about how to use this on your own websites.
Hacks
Aaron Parecki

* Go Go Gallimaufry

At one point it was popular to refer to the eyes as windows to the soul, and common wisdom accepted that you could learn a great deal about a person's inner thoughts by looking at their eyes. Then that notion fell out of fashion, except perhaps in love songs. But once we learned how to track people's eye motions, record them, and analyse the data, we realized that there may have been something to it.
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* How and When to Do It Wrong

Constraints make good art. Everyone knows the right way to design and implement software — but is the wrong way really so bad? This talk demonstrates unconventional approaches to solving common and real problems and explores their benefits and drawbacks.
Hacks
Chromatic X

* How Not to Release Software

You've seen a million best practice talks. This is quite the opposite: I'll instruct you in the ways I've failed over twenty years of software development, and advise you how not to make the same mistakes.
Business
Laura Thomson

* How We Went Remote

Hiring remote workers is great for filling those holes on the team...but if you don't have the correct infrastructure in place you're just setting yourself--and your remote team members--up for a world of hurt. This session will detail how our engineering department went remote and thrived because of it.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Information Radiation and You

Building your company's status board is more than just putting charts on a screen - numbers are just data, whether you write out the digits or plot a squiggly line. Learn to transform your data into information, and let that information instruct you.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Keynote by Sumana Harihareswara

Sumana Harihareswara gave our opening keynote, "Be Bold: An Origin Story".
Culture
Sumana Harihareswara

* Keynote: Fear, Uncertainty, and Dopamine

Beer, cookies, psychopathy, happiness, regret—these are all things the world's greatest scientists have studied in detail. Learn how humans work, and how to get the most out of interacting with them.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Model Data Without Making Tables — A Pervasive Linked Data Stack

Want to be agile? Why bother modeling your data with a static table, declaring classes, and setting up mapping from tables to objects and finally to HTML and back again? The linked data standard presents a more powerful data model, and lets you use your website itself as a database.
Chemistry
Leif Warner

* Practical Lessons from Exotic Languages

Esoteric programming languages never really get the attention they deserve in the mainstream programming culture. We'll examine idioms from several exotic languages and explain how they can improve the quality of more common codebases.
Cooking
Corbin Simpson

* Pro-Style Code Review

Code review is awesome. Do more of it.
Business
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Put the "Ops" in "Dev": What Developers Need to Know About DevOps

How thinking about operations can help you make your code better, stronger, and faster.
Cooking
Greg Lund-Chaix, Lance Albertson, Rudy Grigar, Kenneth Lett

Favorite proposals for this user

* Documentation: Quick and Easy

Whether you’re just rolling out a new project, or you’re maintaining ten years and three major versions of legacy code, good documentation is vital for your users. But writing good docs doesn't need to be a long, painful process. This talk will get you started - and finished! - in no time.
Cooking 2012-03-14 01:05:02 +0000
Noirin Plunkett