Ian Dees's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* !done - Hacking IRC Bots for Distributed Teams

When our company was acquired we needed a way to see everything that was done each day all in one place. Teams were using different methods to do this: standups, written reports, emails and meetings. Nothing stuck. Done reports introduces a simple IRC command: !done. Team members say !done and what they just did. These !dones are put into a daily report. !done becomes a part of everyday at work, not a strained task that’s easily forgotten.
Culture
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* Cool Features of the Z Shell (zsh)

Z Shell is a UNIX shell with a bunch of cool features. Learn about installing and configuring zsh with some of my favorite features.
Cooking
Michael Pigg

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* Geek Choir - Fast!

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hacking your Meatware: exercises you can do at your desk

You will learn about risks to your neck, shoulders, hips and core from sitting at a keyboard for hours at a time. Learn a quick 6-breath sun salutation, simple stretches, the need for regular movement. Discuss sitting, standing, walking, reclining. Simple, incremental, safe, easy.
Hacks
Kurt Sussman

* How My Kids Are Learning to Program By Talking

My children have patiently tolerated a number of teach-STEM-quick schemes their dad has brought home. They've taught robots to dance, created simple animations using Scratch, and, quite frankly, made a lot of poop jokes. What's missing from these programming tools was storytelling. The ones we tried focused either on easy interactivity or expressive power. If only there were a way to combine the two... oh, wait, there was—46 years ago!
Culture
Ian Dees

* How to multiply small integers while <del>Markus</del> human

Thank you! I'm glad someone read the description of this talk on line and remembered to answer Aardvark -- if you hadn't done that, the excerpt wouldn't have actually been part of the talk, and the very fabric of reality could have been threatened!
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Keynote — Alex “Skud” Bayley

Keynote by Alex “Skud” Bayley
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Literate Programming for the 21st Century

Knuth advocated writing programs for people, not computers. How does crafting code with literate programming play with quick iterative development? Example heavy session using org-mode's Babel project and progrmming languages with succinct syntax, like Scala and Clojure.
Cooking
Howard Abrams

* Low-Friction Personal Data Collection

Have you ever wanted to track your movements, sleep, what you eat, who you spend time with, and all sorts of other personal data? In this talk I'll describe the tools I've been able to successfully use to track aspects of my life.
Cooking
Aaron Parecki

* More Code, More Problems

Some people will tell you that you need a large, full-stack framework to do web development The Right Way. These people are wrong.
Cooking
Edward Finkler

* Morning Keynote: James Vasile

Open source!
Culture
James Vasile

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* Quick Cure for the Shame of Untested Software

As the founder of a company focused on software testing, I speak often to developers who admit in private: "Yes, testing is important... but we don't test." Reasons vary, but the basic problem is that testing is seen as too difficult and time-consuming with no apparent value for the effort. In this talk I hope to convince you that this problem is a false dilemma and show you how to get started testing software quickly and easily.
Cooking
Daniel Nichter

* Remote Pair Programming

Remote Pair Programming: my setup, some advice, and a live demo^H^H stress test
Cooking
Sam Livingston-Gray

* Shall We Play A Game?

In just 1.5 hours, I will help you craft a computer game AI that will consistently beat you and your friends.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Smart Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* The Perl Renaissance

The Perl Renaissance is in full swing. Join internationally acclaimed speaker and White Camel Award winner Paul Fenwick as we explore some of the most freakin' amazing developments in the land of Perl!
Chemistry
Paul Fenwick

* What Is That Process Doing?

We're surrounded by programs we didn't write. Inevitably they eventually do the wrong thing, or they just don't do what we need, and we want to find out what they are doing. Learn how to spy on the processes you run.
Chemistry
Greg Price

Favorite proposals for this user

* Building Google Voice with Rails, Backbone, and Twilio

Google Voice may seem like it's performing black magic, but every developer can integrate the same features into their applications today.
Cooking 2013-03-05 21:56:11 +0000
Kevin Whinnery

* Burning the Garden Wall: Usable Content Security for the Web

Want to build secure and powerful applications inside your favorite web communities? Learn about application-injection, a new augmented browsing method built into the Privly application stack.
Chemistry 2013-03-09 21:53:00 +0000
Sean McGregor

* Conference Presentation Mind Control

Have you been at a talk which sounded great on paper, but was lackluster in delivery? Have you discovered that some presenters can seem to make *anything* interesting? Do you want to know how to hack audiences to convince them that your talk is *freakin' amazing* even though it's content-challenged? Want to use your conference presentation skills to kickstart your career in world domination? BYO tinfoil hat.
Hacks 2013-03-10 05:06:32 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Developing For the Cloud...In The Cloud!

We give an indepth introduction to the cloud based developers tool kit. This allows the developer to develop code in the cloud with the code (almost) never touching the hard drive.
Cooking 2013-03-11 15:00:34 +0000
David Duggins

* Digital Nomad: How to stay connected anywhere in the world

For some of us staying connected to the internet is an imperative, and while traveling to foreign lands it can sometimes be difficult to remain connected. Let me share with you some of the techniques that I've discovered for remaining connected while abroad.
Cooking 2013-03-10 04:48:51 +0000
Benjamin Kero

* Do you wish your content management system were as complex as your code? Wish no more.

What happens when you have requirements for a CMS that don’t quite fit any off-the-shelf solutions you can find, so you let your developers run wild with the specs?
Hacks 2013-03-11 20:21:26 +0000
Laurie Kemmerer, Dave Miller, Ravi Gadad

* Earning A Living On Open Source

What if you could spend all your time working on open source technologies and still pay the bills? Sound like a dream? For many developers it's not - it's their daily reality! Learn what it takes to work on open source technologies and products day in and day out from Brandon Savage, an employee of Mozilla, arguably the world's largest open source project.
Business 2013-03-06 14:52:14 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Emotional barriers to getting stuff done

Sometimes you know exactly how to solve a problem, but yet you can't get started. Why is this, and what can you do about it.
Chemistry 2013-03-24 01:42:00 +0000
Daniel Johnson

* Evangelism and community outreach in the 1st century

How a local meetup with 13 participants spread across their known World in a few years, with little budget and gigantic enemies. Beyond miracles and beliefs: let’s look at the tactics and procedures that made the first Christians successful. A historical view of Acts of the Apostles for free software promoters and community managers.
Culture 2013-03-08 07:25:29 +0000
Quim Gil

* Getting Faster: 5 People Who Sped Up Our World

Everywhere we look our world is speeding up. We have "fast food" and "speed dating". In technology we talk of "sprints", and "continuous deployment". But the search for speed is not a new one and has been going on for centuries. Spanning 300 years we'll discuss 5 people who have spent their lives making things faster and learn how we can apply these concepts to the work we're doing today.
Culture 2013-03-23 18:56:20 +0000
Alex Kroman

* Gitolite: Git on the server

Gitolite is next generation git server software. In this talk you'll learn about basic setup and advanced configuration. Awesome things such as branch-specific access controls, ldap/puppet integration, git hook madness and integration with redmine.
Cooking 2013-03-19 02:15:31 +0000
Spencer Krum

* Guerrilla Open Source

Come hear tales of how Open Source can survive, and even thrive, within the confines of some of the world's largest technology companies.
Business 2013-03-09 08:50:29 +0000
Joshua Ballanco

* Hack Your Health With Open Source Tools

The DIY Health Manifesto is an empowerment manual to your own wellness minus the fear mongering and red tape of the American health care establishment. Let's examine the many ways we can measure, control and improve our own health, right here and now, using open source tools and a host of other accessible methods.
Culture 2013-03-21 22:47:47 +0000
Domenika Radonich Leto

* Handcrafted Code? The Programmer in the Age of the Artisan

Culture is diverging in serious and interesting ways. Mass-production is at an all-time high, but a parallel development praises traditional, pre-technological production practices. We lust after devices too shiny to have been made by human hands, and use them to snap photos of organic coffee we insist be roasted less than a mile away. What is the future for programmers in this age? Are we to be replaced eventually by automation, or will there always be a place for "handcrafted code"?
Culture 2013-03-09 23:42:44 +0000
Jonathan Lipps

* Highly Functional Programming (with a Semblance of Reason)

Functional programming is procedural programming without the imperative. Wolf eats the lambda.
Chemistry 2013-03-23 22:41:25 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* Introducing Open Companies

Learn about open companies, a new way to organize work that combines the best of companies with the best of open source.
Business 2013-03-08 21:23:40 +0000
Chad Whitacre

* Let's make programming ridiculously easy

(But why stop there?)
Hacks 2013-03-11 21:55:43 +0000
Joseph Corneli

* Linux Containers: You probably didn't need a VM anyway

Containerization is an often overlooked option for when one needs to solve a problem typically involving the need to create temporary machines to test things or to logically separate machines. I'm here to show you how you can do all this from your laptop without burning your lap, requiring an hour and a half for installation, or filing bugs against IT folks or forking over cash for more cloud instances. Let me explain why LXC is the best option for testing new software and is also an excellent option for taking advantage of production hardware. Topics covered will be basic concepts, installing, cloning, and destroying containers as well as advanced concepts and stupid tricks.
Cooking 2013-03-10 04:26:42 +0000
Benjamin Kero

* Old-school testing that is relevant today

What is an equivalence class? Imagine that you have a function that takes an integer parameter between 1 and 12. The integers from 2 to 11 are in the same class; you probably don't need to test more than one of them. 1 and 12 are boundary values, but they're at opposite ends so you should probably test both. 0 and 13 and negative integers all belong to the same class, "out of range". What other classes might be relevant when testing this function?
Culture 2013-03-09 23:02:43 +0000
Kurt Sussman

* Open Sourcing Book Publishing

You've got a great idea for a book. You write a publisher. You get accepted! Then you find out that they'll pay you $500 and a 10% royalty for your book rights, in exchange for your heart and soul over the next six months. You're crushed. Is there a better way? There certainly is!
Business 2013-03-06 16:40:03 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Publishing & Consuming microformats2

I will talk about the process of developing a microformats2 parser and how to use the tools that already exist to start publishing and consuming them today.
Cooking 2013-03-24 05:31:24 +0000
Jessica Lynn Suttles

* Pure object orientation from the backend to frontend with Rails and MongoDB

As the nature of building software evolves to favor agile development, the infrastructure programmers rely on must also change. This presentation will walk through the advantages of a document database using a Rails app backed by MongoDB as an example.
Cooking 2013-02-01 04:57:54 +0000
Emily Stolfo

* Tech, Bikes, Transit & Lifestyle Options to improve your Programming

I'll be diving deep to discuss the benefits of living well to do better programming. I'll talk about the statistics and data behind dropping the auto-dependent mindset and stepping into the world of cycling, meetups, urban living, clean eating and ways to dramatically improve your innovation, entrepreneurial activities and why these things are connected. As I like to say, "How to get and stay at 100%."
Culture 2013-01-17 22:11:34 +0000
Adron Hall

* Thinking inside the box: Using Things of the Internet to monitor the Internet of Things.

Why use closed source or closed platform tools to monitor the "Internet of Things" when the sysadmin community has been using open source monitoring tools for years?
Cooking 2013-03-24 04:29:14 +0000
Donald Delmar Davis

* What Hath Von Neumann Wrought?

I've sub-titled this presentation "skeptical musings of a reluctant cyborg." I'm mostly going to talk about computational journalism, but don't be surprised if some science fiction finds its way into the discussion.
Culture 2013-03-24 03:38:55 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* What Science Fiction Can Teach Us About Building Communities

Helpful tips about participating in and building open source communities as told through examples of what we can learn about communities from science fiction.
Culture 2013-03-13 15:11:44 +0000
Dawn Foster

* What the Hell Just Happened? How to kill great ideas and alienate everyone by mismanaging your project.

You had the best idea ever. You even had everyone convinced it was the best idea ever. You had a proven plan for project management strategy. But now your best idea is smoldering on the ground, and everyone is running for the exits. What the hell just happened?
Business 2013-03-20 22:27:58 +0000
Chris Chiacchierini

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* <Your Favorite Programming Language> Loses

Every programming language ever created has some horrible mistakes: your favorite is no exception. We'll talk about some fundamental principles of PL design and how they fail to play out in various real languages.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* A Crash Course in Tech Management

'Programmer' and 'Manager' are two different titles for a reason: they're two different jobs and skill sets. If you have managerial aspirations (or have had them foisted upon you), come to this session to learn some of the tricks of the managerial trade.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Adventures in Hipster Programming: Solving a Math Puzzle Using a Genetic Algorithm Programmed in OCaml

I heard Will Shortz pose a mathematical puzzle on NPR on a Sunday Morning in January and I thought, "Hey, I can solve that with a genetic algorithm!" In OCaml. I'll show you how in this talk.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* Building Web Apps with Clojure

Get ready for a whirlwind tour of the current Clojure ecosystem of web app technologies. This talk will demonstrate how fast, responsive apps can be built on this up-and-coming functional language, which is based on Lisp and runs on the JVM.
Cooking
Scott Becker

* Coordinating Usability Testing in Free Software

Freedom 4: The freedom to use the program effectively, efficiently and satisfactory. For a software to truly be free, people need to be able to easily use it without help. A primer to usability testing in a distributed and independent development environment.
Cooking
Jan-Christoph Borchardt

* Dark Arts of Data Storage: What's Your Filesystem up to?

Ever wonder what happens to your data between the write() call and the disk drive? Or feel the need to scrape your bits off the drive after an accident? If so, this talk is for you! Come learn the dark art of how filesystems work.
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* Design and Command Line Applications

Design has permeated our culture and our tools, but the software you're building doesn't have a graphical interface. That doesn't exempt you from thinking about user experience design! Learn how UX principles apply to even basic command line scripts.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Future of Wearable Computing: Constraint, Context and Location

Google will release a wearable heads up display this fall, and it may help to usher in a new era of augmented reality and wearable computing. What does this mean for us? How do we build for the next generation of machines? Who was here before us, and how can we learn from them?
Hacks
Amber Case

* Go Go Gallimaufry

At one point it was popular to refer to the eyes as windows to the soul, and common wisdom accepted that you could learn a great deal about a person's inner thoughts by looking at their eyes. Then that notion fell out of fashion, except perhaps in love songs. But once we learned how to track people's eye motions, record them, and analyse the data, we realized that there may have been something to it.
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* How and When to Do It Wrong

Constraints make good art. Everyone knows the right way to design and implement software — but is the wrong way really so bad? This talk demonstrates unconventional approaches to solving common and real problems and explores their benefits and drawbacks.
Hacks
Chromatic X

* How Not to Release Software

You've seen a million best practice talks. This is quite the opposite: I'll instruct you in the ways I've failed over twenty years of software development, and advise you how not to make the same mistakes.
Business
Laura Thomson

* Information Radiation and You

Building your company's status board is more than just putting charts on a screen - numbers are just data, whether you write out the digits or plot a squiggly line. Learn to transform your data into information, and let that information instruct you.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Keynote: Fear, Uncertainty, and Dopamine

Beer, cookies, psychopathy, happiness, regret—these are all things the world's greatest scientists have studied in detail. Learn how humans work, and how to get the most out of interacting with them.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Logic Lessons That Last Generations

In the 1980s, my grandfather reached onto the bookshelves of his cigar-smoke-seasoned garage laboratory and pulled down a three-ring binder that would change my life. Come hear how a 50-year-old introduction to binary logic has managed to stay relevant after all these decades, and what it means for our own efforts to teach and document technical subjects.
Culture
Ian Dees

* Practical Lessons from Exotic Languages

Esoteric programming languages never really get the attention they deserve in the mainstream programming culture. We'll examine idioms from several exotic languages and explain how they can improve the quality of more common codebases.
Cooking
Corbin Simpson

* Pro-Style Code Review

Code review is awesome. Do more of it.
Business
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Solving Interesting Problems by Writing Parsers

What do you do when you have to parse weird message formats? You write parser! Or, in this case a regular expression. See how I make a moderately challenging problem easy for everyone.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson

* The Art of Customer Engagement and Retention: Premium Support for Freemium Software

Your project won't be successful if people can't use it successfully. There are a lot of tricks to good tech support that won't break the bank.
Business
Chris "Fool" McCraw

* The Art of Open Source DJing

Conditions are rough for an aspiring DJ. More and more venues are starting to care if their performers have a license for their music, and the cost of software, hardware, and music is often more than they would care to spend. Thankfully one does not have to sacrifice on quality when replacing two of these with gratis components.
Hacks
Benjamin Kero

* The Style of Style Guides

When you code, should you indent 2, 4 or 8 characters? Where should you put the braces? What should your variables and functions be named? Is it worth having an argument about any of this? This talk offers an analytical approach to deciding which elements of style will benefit your code. We'll discover which is the "best style" and which is the style you should use.
Chemistry
Michael Schwern

* Thriving in Chaos: An Introduction to Systems Thinking

For centuries we have learned to solve problems with a linear approach. This originated with Isaac Newton in the sevententh century and assumes that everything in the world is connected through cause and effect. Systems thinking throws away that assumption and examines the universe as small pieces connected into a complex network. You will learn how a systems thinking approach can be used to create robust groups that don't have leaders.
Culture
Alex Kroman

* Understand "Inform 7" as Teh Awesome.

Y'know those "Interactive Fiction" (IF) text-adventure thingies? Inform 7 is a language for writing IF in the style of English prose. It's also a neat idea for general modeling. Let's build a simple world together while learning some of what Inform 7 is about.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Using XMonad for a No-Nonsense, Highly Productive Linux Desktop Experience

Many Linux desktop environments try to be easy to use for the average user, but that's not you. You're at your computer all day writing code; you don't want to mess around with *dragging windows* or (ugh) watching *animated transitions*. David Brewer will demonstrate how by using xmonad, a tiling window manager, you can free yourself from the tyranny of the mouse.
Cooking
David Brewer

* What the Hell Is Wrong with You People? Pushing Change Across an Organization from the Basement Office

You have a great idea, perhaps the best idea ever, but you work with a bunch of know-it-alls, scaredy cats, well poisoners and lazy asses. You need a project management cycle that praises, emboldens, listens and inspires. You need a project management cycle that works.
Business
Chris Chiacchierini, Chris Langford

* What We Talk About When We Talk About Project Management

We ask for a lot of things under the heading of 'project management'. This leads to pain and suffering when we are not clear for what we are asking for, or we're not set up to support what we're asking for. This is particularly special in open source companies and projects.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* When Google Maps Gives You Lemons, Make Lemonade

Make your life sweeter by replacing Google Maps with open-source alternatives.
Cooking
Wm Leler

* Why You Need to Host 100 New Wikis Just for Yourself

The Federated Wiki offers a new form of conversation well suited for charting our collective future.
Culture
Ward Cunningham

* Wise Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

Favorite proposals for this user

* Documentation: Quick and Easy

Whether you’re just rolling out a new project, or you’re maintaining ten years and three major versions of legacy code, good documentation is vital for your users. But writing good docs doesn't need to be a long, painful process. This talk will get you started - and finished! - in no time.
Cooking 2012-03-14 01:05:02 +0000
Noirin Plunkett

Open Source Bridge 2011 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Women (and their friends) in Tech Go Drinking

Code N Splode is a local user group that supports the participation of women in the Portland tech community. We'd like to go out for drinks with you while you're at OS Bridge!
BOF
Addie Beseda

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* Composing Software Systems

If you can't reproduce your work reliably then you can't maintain it. You may get by for a while with ad-hoc build/release/deployment processes, but sooner or later they'll bite you. We'll present a new practical approach to assembling both software products and installed systems, drawing inspiration from sources including the functional programming community, commercial software projects, large IT deployments, and Linux distributions like Debian. Slides available at http://apters.com/osbridge2011.pdf
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Control Emacs with Your Beard: the All-Singing All-Dancing Intro to Hacking the Kinect

See! The Amazing Future of Human-Computer Interaction! Behold! The Awesome Power of Open-Source Libraries and Cheap Video-Game Accessories! Fake Beards!
Hacks
Devin Chalmers, Greg Borenstein

* Data Science in the Open

Data Science promises to transform ubiquitous and cheap data into insights with the potential for great social, scientific and personal value. I will provide a lightning tour of high level theory, concepts, and tools to extract knowledge and value from data.
Cooking
John Taylor

* Data Warehousing 101

ETL. OLAP. BIDW. ELT. M/R. MPP. Windowing. Matviews. Data Marts. Column Stores. Are you at sea in a tidal surge of arcane terminology, trying to cope with big data problems?
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* Geek Fitness: Your Body is not Just Transportation for Your Brain

Optimize your productivity by keeping your body healthy. Learn how to prevent 'laptop back' and RSI; extend your workday by taking care of your body.
Chemistry
Kurt Sussman

* Getting Started with FPGAs and HDLs

Lots of attention has been given to GPUs for speeding up certain types of computations. While GPUs are very well suited for vector operations, there are other things they are not so well suited for. FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) are not used as widely yet, but they offer a much more flexible computing fabric than GPUs. You can implement a GPU in an FPGA, for example, or you could implement your own custom processor optimized for very specialized tasks. The barrier to entry can be high for FPGAs: how does a person with a software development background get started using them? And what about HDLs (Hardware Description Langauges) used to program FPGAs? What's the difference between simulation and synthesis? What kinds of tools are freely available? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this session.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* Give a Great Tech Talk

Why do so many technical presentations suck? Make sure that yours doesn't. Josh Berkus and Ian Dees will show you how to share your ideas with your audience by speaking effectively and (when the situation warrants it) showing your code.
Culture
Ian Dees, Josh Berkus

* GraphViz: The Open-Source Body Scanner for Code, Systems, and Data

Do you generate, manage, or analyze a lot of data? Do you develop software? Do you like pretty pictures? If your answer was "yes" to zero or more of these questions, this talk is for you.
Chemistry
Matt Youell

* How 5 People with 4 Day Jobs in 3 Time Zones Enjoyed 2 Years Writing 1 Book

Hear how a distributed team tackled a big project (a book about a large open source project) in our spare time. Along the way, we encountered tools, techniques, and working styles that may be useful to you in your own career—or at least serve as a humorous warning.
Business
Ian Dees

* Kick Asana

"Yoga for Geeks", sometimes known as "Yoga for Long-Haul Travelers", returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* King of the Data Jungle

In this puppet show, a wise lion coaches an eager but inexperienced mouse through the process of normalization and (equally important) denormalization.
Cooking
Melissa Hollingsworth

* Modern Perl Made Painless

Improvements in Perl 5 over the past several years allow great programmers to do great things with less code. You too can turn your Perl 5 code from mere scripting into powerful, clear, and modern programming--with help from a few tools the world's best Perl programmers already know and love.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* Morning Keynote - Hacking for Freedom

The last year has shown the Internet and computers to be a major force for freedom and self-determination around the world. The presenter discusses his work as a hacktivist. Working with Anonymous and Telecomix, he has helped organized protests in support of WikiLeaks, provided communications support to Egypt and the Middle East, and generally fought the good fight.
Culture
Peter Fein

* Open Source GIS Desktop Smackdown

See the leading open source GIS desktop systems solve real world problems.
Chemistry
David Percy, Darrell Fuhriman, Christian Schumann-Curtis

* Preventing Runtime Errors at Compile Time

Are you tired of null pointer exceptions, unintended side effects, SQL injections, concurrency errors, mistaken equality tests, and other run-time errors that appear during testing or in the field? A compile-time tool named the Checker Framework has found hundreds of such errors. Oracle plans to include it in the Java 8 javac, but you can use it today to improve your code and avoid errors.
Cooking
David Lazar, Michael Ernst, Werner Dietl

* Snooze, the Totally RESTful Language

As you can see we get a "403 Forbidden" in response to our "POST /integer/5/increment"...can anyone tell me why? It worked when we did "PUT /variable/x/let/integer/5" followed by "POST /variable/x/increment", so why can't we do it directly?
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* Technical Debt

Technical debt is something that most project teams or independent developers have to deal with - we take shortcuts to push out releases, deadlines need to be met, quick fixes slowly become the standard. In this talk, we will discuss what technical debt is, when it is acceptable and when it isn't, and strategies for effectively managing it, both on an independent and team level.
Cooking
Elizabeth Naramore

* Testing Antipatterns

Tests are great - except when they aren't. Learn how to avoid writing tests that are more trouble than they're worth.
Cooking
Matt Robinson

Favorite proposals for this user

* "You want me to test this !?!?" - Lessons learned from testing legacy code

In this talk I'll explore stategies for getting testing going inside your project, drawing upon experiences of making legacy code more testable.
Cooking 2011-02-02 04:22:53 +0000
John Mertic

* <Your Favorite Programming Language> Loses

Every programming language in wide use has some horrible mistakes: your favorite is no exception. We'll talk about some fundamental principles of PL design and how they play out in various real languages.
Chemistry 2011-03-14 05:26:26 +0000
Bart Massey

* An Exploration of Hardware and what it Portends for Open Source Software

From the early PC to today's laptop we have a million times the memory, a million times the disk storage, and similar increases in processing capabilities. What problems/opportunities does another million fold increase in raw computing bring?
Chemistry 2011-03-14 20:33:43 +0000
Robert Thilsted

* Cloud9 IDE

We believe that the browser is the future; therefore we have always seen the Open Web as a robust platform for application development. We are building Cloud9 IDE as a SaaS service with an open source foundation.
Cooking 2011-02-17 13:42:40 +0000
Rik Arends

* Forge.mil: What the Department of Defense can teach us about Community Development

Since its launch in 2009, Forge.mil, the Department of Defense’s groundbreaking collaborative software development platform, has quickly garnered over 8000 members and over 400 projects. Its utilization of open-source principles has improved the ability of the military to rapidly deliver dependable software. Its efficient use of scarce resources provides a model of collaborative cooperation that can benefit all communities in and out of the government.
Culture 2011-03-09 18:26:23 +0000
Guy Martin

* Geek Choir 3.0 (Short Form)

Geek Choir - The Return!
Culture 2011-02-11 21:51:53 +0000
Michael Alan Brewer

* GNOME 3 - A New Desktop Experience

GNOME 3 was released in April 2011. A presentation on the thought process in innovating a different user experience on the desktop.
Cooking 2011-02-16 06:20:07 +0000
Sriram Ramkrishna

* GovHub - Sustainable open source projects through government bids

Much of the difficulty for open source developers who try to work on civic or government apps is getting past the RFP process and convincing analysts and procurement officers that their projects have long term value and support. We hope to supply details on how to find and respond to the RFP process as well hints on how to work outside the process.
Business 2011-03-08 10:02:14 +0000
Greg Lind

* Hacking the Wet/Fleshy Processor — Meditation for Coders to access both sides of the brain.

Sherri & Faddah Yuetsu will offer basic techniques and provide suggestions (and further reading) on how meditation can be useful tool not only to center, but to make those creative leaps into the beyond in one's coding.
Culture 2011-03-09 16:02:05 +0000
Sherri Koehler

* Henry Ford product development

10-steps to build great web products like Henry Ford built Model T's
Cooking 2011-01-20 05:39:33 +0000
Chris McCoy

* Running an Open Source Project in a Closed Source Community

How do you go about building an open source project in a community known for waiting on the Mothership to bless them with new code?
Culture 2011-02-17 07:57:21 +0000
John Sheehan