Chris "Fool" McCraw's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* <Your Favorite Programming Language> Loses

Every programming language ever created has some horrible mistakes: your favorite is no exception. We'll talk about some fundamental principles of PL design and how they fail to play out in various real languages.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Dark Arts of Data Storage: What's Your Filesystem up to?

Ever wonder what happens to your data between the write() call and the disk drive? Or feel the need to scrape your bits off the drive after an accident? If so, this talk is for you! Come learn the dark art of how filesystems work.
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* Design and Command Line Applications

Design has permeated our culture and our tools, but the software you're building doesn't have a graphical interface. That doesn't exempt you from thinking about user experience design! Learn how UX principles apply to even basic command line scripts.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Free for Open Source: Marketing to Developers

Developers, like hipsters are simultaneously dead simple and infuriatingly difficult as marketing targets. Learn how supporting open source can be used as a tool to entice developers into your product's world.
Business
Michael Bleigh

* Future of Wearable Computing: Constraint, Context and Location

Google will release a wearable heads up display this fall, and it may help to usher in a new era of augmented reality and wearable computing. What does this mean for us? How do we build for the next generation of machines? Who was here before us, and how can we learn from them?
Hacks
Amber Case

* Go Go Gallimaufry

At one point it was popular to refer to the eyes as windows to the soul, and common wisdom accepted that you could learn a great deal about a person's inner thoughts by looking at their eyes. Then that notion fell out of fashion, except perhaps in love songs. But once we learned how to track people's eye motions, record them, and analyse the data, we realized that there may have been something to it.
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* How and When to Do It Wrong

Constraints make good art. Everyone knows the right way to design and implement software — but is the wrong way really so bad? This talk demonstrates unconventional approaches to solving common and real problems and explores their benefits and drawbacks.
Hacks
Chromatic X

* How Not to Release Software

You've seen a million best practice talks. This is quite the opposite: I'll instruct you in the ways I've failed over twenty years of software development, and advise you how not to make the same mistakes.
Business
Laura Thomson

* How to Win Collaborators and Influence Community: Encouraging (& Not Discouraging) Novice Coders

Interested in helping others learn to code? How do you help give them a running start, without throwing roadblocks in their way? Come get better at helping other people get better.
Culture
Liene Verzemnieks

* Information Radiation and You

Building your company's status board is more than just putting charts on a screen - numbers are just data, whether you write out the digits or plot a squiggly line. Learn to transform your data into information, and let that information instruct you.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Keynote by Sumana Harihareswara

Sumana Harihareswara gave our opening keynote, "Be Bold: An Origin Story".
Culture
Sumana Harihareswara

* Keynote: Fear, Uncertainty, and Dopamine

Beer, cookies, psychopathy, happiness, regret—these are all things the world's greatest scientists have studied in detail. Learn how humans work, and how to get the most out of interacting with them.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Open Education Tools for Mentoring and Learning

The internet is full of information. Some of this information was made to help people learn. A subset exists under open licenses. These open educational resources (OERs) are used all over the world for learning and teaching. This talk will cover what some of them are and explore ways they have been (and can be) used for mentors and self-learners--both as individuals and in peer-study groups.
Culture
Molly de Blanc

* Outreach Events: My Triumphs, My Mistakes

We all love sprinting with other experts, but how do you design an event effectively to reach out to and train newbies? It takes more work than you might think (publicity, prep, structure, and followup), but here's how.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Asheesh Laroia

* Painting the Bikeshed: Lessons from A Drupal 8 Initiative Lead

In March of 2011 I was named by Drupal project lead Dries Buytaert as lead of an initiative to improve configuration management for the next release. This talk will discuss how I went from lone coder to community leader and some of the lessons I learned along the way.
Culture
Greg Dunlap

* Rise of the Indie Web

Meet the pioneers of the new Indie Web, learn what's changed, and how you too can reclaim your content, your data, your online identity. Join our panelists as they debate a variety of different approaches and learn how you too can get started and join the new Indie Web.
Culture
Tantek Çelik

* Scaling Your Community by Nurturing Leaders

In this session, we’ll talk about strategies for nurturing, empowering and rewarding community leaders to help scale your open source community. Most of the examples will come from 10gen’s experience working with the community around the open source database MongoDB.
Business
Meghan Gill

* Text Lacks Empathy

Have you ever written a nice friendly email and gotten a reply that seems like they read a whole different email? Textual communication has special problems. This talk will help you mitigate them: ensuring that what you mean to say is what is understood; interpreting messages that seem totally out of whack; and increasing empathic bandwidth.
Culture
Michael Schwern, Noirin Plunkett

* The Art of Customer Engagement and Retention: Premium Support for Freemium Software

Your project won't be successful if people can't use it successfully. There are a lot of tricks to good tech support that won't break the bank.
Business
Chris "Fool" McCraw

* The Style of Style Guides

When you code, should you indent 2, 4 or 8 characters? Where should you put the braces? What should your variables and functions be named? Is it worth having an argument about any of this? This talk offers an analytical approach to deciding which elements of style will benefit your code. We'll discover which is the "best style" and which is the style you should use.
Chemistry
Michael Schwern

* Thriving in Chaos: An Introduction to Systems Thinking

For centuries we have learned to solve problems with a linear approach. This originated with Isaac Newton in the sevententh century and assumes that everything in the world is connected through cause and effect. Systems thinking throws away that assumption and examines the universe as small pieces connected into a complex network. You will learn how a systems thinking approach can be used to create robust groups that don't have leaders.
Culture
Alex Kroman

* Toward an Open Source Process for Security Vulnerabilities

Security vulnerabilities can be a source of anxiety and lost sleep, or they can be a carefully managed opportunity to bring communities together, practice safe operational practices, and prevent problems. Join me to discuss how we can all manage our security issues sanely and cooperatively, and lose less sleep!
Business
Larissa Shapiro

* What Is My Kernel Doing?

Ever wonder what your kernel is doing? We instrumented kernels on both web servers and personal workstations, and then measured to see what they're doing.
Chemistry
Randy Appleton

* Why You Need to Host 100 New Wikis Just for Yourself

The Federated Wiki offers a new form of conversation well suited for charting our collective future.
Culture
Ward Cunningham

* Wise Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

Favorite proposals for this user

* Documentation: Quick and Easy

Whether you’re just rolling out a new project, or you’re maintaining ten years and three major versions of legacy code, good documentation is vital for your users. But writing good docs doesn't need to be a long, painful process. This talk will get you started - and finished! - in no time.
Cooking 2012-03-14 01:05:02 +0000
Noirin Plunkett