VM Brasseur's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* Care and Feeding of a Healthy Job Hunt

A job hunt can be a demoralizing and dehumanizing process, but there are a lot of things which you can do to make it more productive and less stressful.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Cassandra at the Keyboard: Whistleblowing at all scales

What do you do if you see something that needs change in your organization. How do you "say something" for your "see something"? What are the benefits and drawbacks of even minor whistleblowing?
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Failing With Grace

One of the biggest challenges of building distributed systems is dealing with failure. In this talk we'll explore how distributed systems fail and then once we're good and scared, we'll cover a number of approaches and tools to help you deal with failure.
Cooking
Sean O'Connor

* GeekChoir 2015

In this session, we'll continue the grand Open Source Bridge tradition of learning how to increase team cohesion, identity, and collaboration through music, joining our voices (in our uniquely geeky way) in harmony.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal and social identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* How to Really Get Git

You already know how to use “git status”, “git push”, and “git add” for your personal projects. You know how to work on a team project with git version control. How do you achieve the next level of git mastery and fix mistakes? We’ll cover how to set up your git environment for a productive workflow, different ways to undo your mistakes in git, and finally, how to use the IPython notebook to automate an entire git workflow.
Hacks
Susan Tan

* Learning and Knowing with Federated Wiki

@AlysonIndrunas RT @Bali_Maha's wonderful beautiful thoughtful #fedwiki succinct summary "it is a new approach to looking at knowledge we construct together"
Culture
Ward Cunningham

* Leveraging Docker to Enable Learning

When giving workshops or presenting online tutorials, it's frequently the case that the system setup can take longer than the actual learning exercises. Using Docker to provide a learning sandbox solves this problem while avoiding changing the learner's system in potentially destructive ways.
Cooking
Kirsten Hunter

* Making Docker Actually Work

Workflow and tools to make Docker work the way it should, in production and in development
Cooking
Simon McFarlane

* Probably

If you want to understand probability better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Through the Warp Zone: Hacking Super Mario Brothers

Discover new worlds in Super Mario Brothers even the creators never saw!
Hacks
Emily St., Shawna Scott

* Trustworthy software in the real world

Software is made of bugs, yet software is controlling a growing part of our physical world. As bugs and security holes become potentially life-threatening, what can we do to make our software worthy of the trust we're placing in it? Take quadcopters, for example. Toy vehicles are not just in specialty hobby shops but even in supermarkets; sports stadiums and the White House are trying to find ways to keep them out; and everyone from agriculture startups to Amazon wants to use them commercially. Quadcopters are becoming safety and security critical systems, but how are we going to make them truly safe and secure? I'll present SMACCMPilot, a BSD-licensed high-assurance quadcopter autopilot, and the new tools and technologies that make it feasible to trust a large piece of software.
Hacks
Jamey Sharp

* When Your Codebase Is Nearly Old Enough To Vote

What do you do when your project is so old that technology has changed around you? (Or, how do you future-proof a project that you've just started so that when it gets that old, you'll be ready?) Come hear a case study of Dreamwidth Studios, a fifteen-year-old web app with a codebase consisting of a quarter million lines of legacy Perl and a mission to modernize ... if it doesn't break everything.
Chemistry
Denise Paolucci

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* A short examination on the intersection of security and usability (or How usable security could save us all)

This talk is geared for people with minimal experience with usability and some experience with security
Chemistry
Morgan Miller

* An Adventure in Data Modeling: The Entity-Attribute-Value Model

A case study on the trials of Emma's performance when implementing the Entity-Attribute-Value data model on their PostgreSQL database systems.
Chemistry
Mark Wong

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor

* Crash Course in Tech Management

Managing is a skill which you can master just as you did programming. This session will introduce you to many of the skills and resources you’ll need to become a successful tech manager (and keep your team from wanting to string you up).
Business
VM Brasseur

* Distributed Agile Development or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Remoties

This is the story of how the mobile web engineering team at the Wikimedia Foundation became an extremely high-functioning and successful agile team: by embracing - rather than shying away from - a distributed model. This talk will explore the agile team's journey and how we cope with the inherent tension of remoteness and the agile principle, 'The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation'.
Culture
Arthur Richards

* DIY User Research for Open Source Projects

Open source is only about open code, right? Wrong. Interviews, questionnaires, quick usability tests, and many other research types all have a place in the open source development process. With a few easy steps and a set of scripts to follow, your community can make user research an easy and essential component of your open source project.
Culture
Erin Richey

* Don't Let Your Tests Flake Out

The build's red with a test failure. You re-run the tests and suddenly all is well. What's going on?
Cooking
Jason Clark

* From the Bottom Up: Building Community-Owned and -Operated Mesh Networks

This panel highlights the work of a few folks representing part of a broad, international movement consisting of network engineers, community change makers, researchers, architects, and thinkers who are building decentralized and autonomous communications infrastructure. We know that the Internet is deeply broken, and we are rebuilding, from the inside out. We mitigate the ills of interception and interference on the net by facilitating networks that are owned, operated, and governed by the people that use them.
Culture
Jenny Ryan, Mitar Milutinovic, Marc Juul, Russell Senior

* Geek Choir

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* How to make generics in C: an adventure in sorting

This will be a talk on how to hack C to get generics-like support, which we used to make a super-fast C sorting library, all in headers. We'll also talk about sorting in general, and the various kinds of sorting algorithms, and why this hack helps so much.
Hacks
Christopher Swenson

* Internet Archive: More than the Wayback Machine

In this session we will: * Give you a tour of Internet Archive and its collections * Introduce you to the APIs and tools you can use to access and contribute to the Archive * Show examples of how other people and institutions are using the Archive
Chemistry
VM Brasseur, Alexis Rossi

* Intro to the IndieWeb: How Far Can We Go?

What happens when an online service you use freezes your account, loses your data, or goes out of business? Have you ever used a service by a company that suddenly went under, stranding your data? Do you own your own identity or does somebody else? What happened to the web in 2003, and how did we get where we are today? This talk will teach you how to post on your own site and optionally syndicate to other sites (POSSE), how to authenticate with your own domain (IndieAuth) and steps to take data ownership back into your own hands.
Chemistry
Amber Case

* Introduction to Scala

Scala is an up-and-coming language, used by companies like Twitter and LInkedIn. This talk will give an overview of Scala and introduce basic language features.
Chemistry
Todd Lisonbee

* Knitting for programmers

Yeah, you've seen us knitting during talks. I promise we're paying more attention than the people with their laptops open. Well, now learn how we do what we do... the programmer way. I'll start with the topology of individual stitches and go through geometry to design patterns, and by the end of it you'll know how to knit a sweater.
Hacks
Alex Bayley

* Know Thy Neighbor: Scikit and the K-Nearest Neighbor Algorithm

This presentation will give a brief overview of machine learning, the k-nearest neighbor algorithm and Scikit-learn. Sometimes developers need to make decisions, even when they don't have all of the required information. Machine learning attempts to solve this problem by using known data (a training data sample) to make predictions about the unknown. For example, usually a user doesn't tell Amazon explicitly what type of book they want to read, but based on the user's purchasing history, and the user's demographic, Amazon is able to induce what the user might like to read.
Cooking
Portia Burton

* Learning Open Source as a course in Africa University

PHP, MySql, PhoneGap, PrestaShop, Magento, Wordpress, Drupal.
Culture
Olainiyan Adewale

* Math vs. Mathematics

Most people got through their high school math classes by memorizing nonsensical statements and regurgitating them on command. If you came out of that class hating math, no one would blame you, especially not a mathematician. However, that class didn't teach Intro to Algebra, it taught Intermediate Following Instructions.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh, Jenner Hanni

* Modern Home Automation

There are a few different options available to you to control your home automation system. Many manufacturers make it convenient to use their system by not only making a convenient to install their products and use their interface, but will actually host all the software portions for you. Many provide apps for your IOS or Android device and have web interfaces for your laptop as well, making the control of these devices very streamlined and simple, especially if there are many devices to be managed. Other more DIY-approach solutions also have interfaces to control your automation, although require a bit more setup. For example, with the power strip in the previous example, you first need to connect it to your wireless network, and then you'll be able to use the supplied phone/tablet app to toggle the ports on/off. As with anything DIY: The sky's the limit, although it requires more technical understanding of what's going on.
Cooking
Ben Kero

* NerdCred++; How to Customize your Bash Prompt

The terminal is a powerful tool on any developer’s belt. The command line interface provides extensive functionality via simple entry of commands. In this workshop we will customize the development experience by adding personal ⭐︎flair⭐︎ and making the most of limited screen real estate. Customizing the prompt provides additional information and functionality with the bonus of flair. Participants will be able to take pride in custom craftsmanship with the result.
Hacks
Pamela Ocampo, Rachel Walker

* Open Hardware from Breadboard to PCB

So you've built a breadboard circuit with wires everywhere. What's next? A printed circuit board! I'll talk about your open hardware development options through the lens of my recent project turning a breadboard prototype into a finished Arduino shield for a curing oven at Portland State.
Cooking
Jenner Hanni

* Open source software could save libraries! Maybe!

There are opportunities for open source to help save the day for libraries, ending many of librarians' and library users' woes.
Business
Coral Sheldon-Hess

* Random

If you want to understand randomness better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* REI's Expedition into Open Source

The software engineers at REI build, maintain, and operate the cooperative’s digital retail infrastructure, from our mobile apps to REI.com, and it runs on open source. We see many benefits to open sourcing our code, but it’s uncharted territory for REI. This is our journey preparing the cooperative to contribute our code back to the open source community. Will we be successful? What have we learned? You’ll find out!
Business
Rob McGuire-Dale

* Replacing `import` with `accio`: Compiling Pythons with Custom Grammar for the sake of a joke

In Python, overwriting builtin functions is fairly easy. You can even do it in the interpreter! But can you overwrite a statement, like import, just as easily? Let's go on an adventure, discovering how the import statement works, and how Python statements are defined in the CPython source code. We'll face some consequences of bootstrapping, and, to get our custom Harry Potter-themed Grammar to work, we'll have to compile a Python to compile a Python.
Chemistry
Amy Hanlon

* Rocket Science On Github

Git isn't just for code. What about CAD files? Experimental test data? How do you manage a multidisciplinary project with git? Last year Portland State Aerospace Society, a relatively large open source rocketry project, moved all their work onto github. I'll share my experience with the switch from a few self hosted git repos to a full fledged github presence. What worked, what hasn't, github's features for non coders, and a little on the future of open science.
Culture
Nathan Bergey

* Scottish Folk Dance: If you can follow code, you can dance!

Can you follow and write code? Do you participate in the ebb and flow of open source communities? Does pivoting those skills into a social form of exercise appeal to you? If so, then Scottish folk dancing might be for you!
Culture
Darrick Wong

* Slytherin 101: How To Win Friends and Influence People

Do you wish that you were better at getting people to do what you need them to do? Do you keep getting put in charge of things and then get stuck wondering how the heck you're supposed to get things done? Do you keep getting into conflicts with other people because of stuff you've said, and you aren't entirely sure why? Fortunately, Slytherin House has you covered. Come to this talk and learn the basics of how to hack human relationships, using the tools of cunning and ambition to achieve inter-House harmony. As long as you promise not to use these techniques to support the next Dark Lord, of course.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* SQL Utility Belt

SQL is an incredibly powerful language, but it can be difficult sometimes to advance beyond the basics. In this session, we will go over several tricks and tips to expand your SQL tool kit.
Cooking
Michael Alan Brewer

* Supporting communities with Gittip

There are lots of people doing good work in the world, and while there seems to be a myriad of ways to provide financial "donations", few of them provide a way to do so in a sustainable manner. We're going to look at Gittip, a freedom loving platform to provide a sustainable, predictable income to those making the world a better place.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* The 20,000km view: How GPS works

GPS is more than just letting your phone tell you where you are. I believe GPS is a contender for "most amazing piece of engineering in the history of humanity", and I'll show you why.
Chemistry
Jamey Sharp

* The Promise of Collaborative Magic

Open source thrives on the idea of people helping one another in reaching their project's goals. But is it working the way that it's supposed to be? This session hopes to discuss the importance of constructive collaboration in our communities, how we encourage them, and what we can do if they're not working out the way they're supposed to.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Trust, Community, and Automatic Updates

WordPress shipped in October what is perhaps its most polarizing feature ever — automatic updates in the background of self-hosted web software, on by default and no easy way to turn it off. In most open source communities, this would be cause for open revolt. Learn how through trust, communication, and a steadfast commitment to its philosophies, the WordPress core team convinced a skeptical community to go along, even if it meant users giving up some control.
Culture
Andrew Nacin

* Utilizing open source medical systems to reach the next 33 million

There is an increase in double burden of diseases in developing countries accruing from the rise of non communicable and infectious diseases. This situation is worsened by lack of adequate financing, inadequate infrastructure for delivering health care, low health literacy and inadequate personnel. Health information systems drive the global health agenda , and huge investments are continuously being made to bridge the digital divide to improve health care delivery. 1. What are the opportunities to effectively deploy open source technologies in developing countries? 2. How do we create ownership, partnerships and collaborations that support scaling open source medical records system 3. What are the effective design thinking techniques that drive development of open source record systems
Business
judy wawira

* Vim Your Way

You’ve learned to do things Vim’s way; now it’s time for Vim to learn to do things your way. We'll learn more about customizing Vim to fit your needs and workflow.
Cooking
Emily St.

* When Firefox Faceplants - what the fox says and who is listening

Ever seen Firefox crash and hesitated to press that 'Send the Report' button because you don't know what would happen next? This is what happens next.
Chemistry
Lars Lohn

* When Many Eyes Fail You: Tales from Security Standards and Open Source

It's often said that "given many eyes, all bugs are shallow" and open source proponents love to list this as a reason that open source is more secure than its closed-source relatives. While that makes a nice sound bite, the reality of security with many eyeballs doesn't fit so nicely into a tweet. This talk will explore some of the things that surprised me in going from academic security research to industry security research in open source and open standards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* Who broke the code? Finding problems quickly in a quickly evolving opensource project

In this talk, we will overview the 0day kernel test infrastructure, an Intel project where the goal is to ensure the quality of Linux upstream and developmental kernels. The project runs 7x24 tests on bleeding edge code from 300+ kernel git trees.
Chemistry
Timothy Chen

Favorite proposals for this user

* Applied Machine Learning

Are you intrigued by Machine Learning but don’t know how to actually use it? This talk will focus on a specific case, solving a large scale Entity Resolution (De-Duplication) problem with an open source Support Vector Machine (SVM).
Cooking 2014-04-05 05:19:59 +0000
Clayton McClure

* Apprenticeships: I implore you!

Talk Outline: My background pre-programming Attending gSchool (6 month Ruby on Rails program), hired as an apprentice Why we need apprenticeships What senior developers and teams get out of apprenticeships What you can do / My suggestions for working with apprentices
Culture 2014-03-12 20:14:09 +0000
Jennifer Eliuk

* Audience controlled games using the Kinect

How do you keep a crowd engaged? In this never been done before talk I'm going to use the Kinect and some other cool software tricks to keep the crowd engaged for 45minutes.
Cooking 2014-04-12 03:23:50 +0000
Justin Woo

* Balancing Corporate Need and Community Good: Thoughts from the Xen Project

When you have a project with strong corporate interest, how do you safeguard the Open Source community life and values? How do you keep Open Source from being simply another corporate development methodology when it is, in fact, the key to geek empowerment?
Culture 2014-03-17 15:01:51 +0000
Russell Pavlicek

* Beyond Feature Requests: what do users really want?

Moving from pie-in-the-sky feature requests to an actionable set of staged designs buildable on a non-profit's budget. We sat down with power users of our tools to figure out what the actual use cases for the map data they generated were and how our software could be re-designed around it. I'll discuss the design research, moderated discussions, and data narrative creation with our user community to imagine version 2.0 of our application Mapknitter.
Culture 2014-04-11 23:08:08 +0000
mathew lippincott

* Blueflood: A case study in open-sourcing a large piece of infrastructure software

The hardest nut to crack in most open sources projects is usually not technical. Figuring out the right ingredients to a successful community is often the difference between successful and less-successful open source projects.
Culture 2014-03-24 14:41:16 +0000
Gary Dusbabek

* Bonnie and Vinson Help with Data Visualization

Everyone and their dog are turning out graphs of social networks. My helpers are Bonnie and Vinson. With their help I will construct visualizations of interesting data using R and its libraries.
Chemistry 2014-04-02 23:18:49 +0000
Mary Anne Thygesen

* C++11 From the Trenches

"I'm from the C++ standards committee, and I'm here to help." Are they really? The 2011 revision of the language contains a ton of changes that are supposed to help us solve problems. But which problems, and why? In this presentation, we're going cut through the bullet lists and get right to the parts of C++11 that can actually make life easier for programmers.
Cooking 2014-04-11 18:33:53 +0000
Ian Dees

* Cooking with Camlistore

Learn to store, search, share, and organize your data using Camlistore, the open source personal storage system.
Cooking 2014-04-04 22:01:12 +0000
Eric Drechsel

* Deploy a highly available message bus with ActiveMQ and Zookeeper

How to deploy ActiveMQ and Zookeeper using LevelDB in a Master/Slave/Slave global configuration.
Cooking 2014-04-03 04:49:35 +0000
Michael Ewan

* Deploying Perl Applications with Carton

Carton is Bundler for Perl. It allows installing a consistent set of modules local to an application. We use it to deploy large Perl applications
Cooking 2014-04-12 03:04:28 +0000
Ian Burrell

* Eat your open source software

A whirlwind tour of open source software (and open hardware, open data, and other open stuff) related to growing, distributing, cooking, and eating food. From seedbanks to recipes to food co-ops, there's open source alternatives to almost every part of the food system.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 16:39:18 +0000
Alex Bayley

* etcd: distributed locking and service discovery

etcd provides easy to use distributed locking and service discovery. It has an accessible HTTP+JSON API that exposes a powerful set of primitives inspired by projects like Google's Chubby and Apache Zookeeper. This talk will cover the underlying consensus algorithm, the architecture of the code, introduce the API and survey the libraries and tools that have been built by the etcd community.
Chemistry 2014-04-08 06:09:21 +0000
Brandon Philips

* Fennec, the ultimate testers toolbox

Fennec ties together several testing related modules and enhances their functionality in ways you don't get when loading them individually. Fennec makes testing easier, and more useful. Areas Fennec affects are Concurrency, State, Workflow, Tools, and Mocking.
Cooking 2014-03-24 15:26:50 +0000
Chad Granum

* Fix Code, Delete Docs

Educators, authors, and co-workers are constantly demanding more code comments and documentation, yet none of them ever update it. The comments lie, the documentation exists in three variants, and still nobody knows how to make the code do the right thing.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 08:03:19 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* Hacking Autism with the Kinect

I'll show a cool hack we did with the Kinect for kids with Autism
Hacks 2014-04-12 02:26:05 +0000
Justin Woo

* Hacking the DevOps Talent Pipeline

The Open Source Lab at Oregon State University constantly struggles to produce enough students to fulfill companies' recruiting demands. As part of our recent transition into the school of computer science at OSU, we've started a DevOps training program. We're teaching open source systems administration and software development skills to all interested students, regardless of experience level. This talk will discuss what we've done, our results, and what you can learn from our experiences.
Cooking 2014-04-05 04:58:52 +0000
E. Dunham, Dean Johnson

* High Failability

Want to hear real-world, sanitized tales of failed website launches? We could just talk launch success, but that's just not as interesting. Fire and brimstone with a positive spin. Educational pain.
Chemistry 2014-04-08 00:19:15 +0000
howard draper, Emily Slocombe

* How "Open" Changes Product Development

There's a lot of speculation about open source product development. How can a product with "no IP" be competitive? What are the viable business models, when the code is freely available? And how am I supposed to build and take a viable product to market if my company is focused on services, not products? The truth is, you can build -- and successfully take to market -- an open source product. But the rules are different, and must not be ignored.
Business 2014-04-11 23:56:43 +0000
Karen Borchert

* How to be a functional programmer without being a jerk about it

It's OK to admit it: All your friends are coming in to work in the morning talking about that wicked sweet algorithm they wrote in like 3 lines of OCaml, and you're a little jealous. You went and downloaded haskell and started playing around and then: "OH GOD HOW DO I WRITE A LOOP WAIT WHY?". Come learn the principles of functional you can apply in any language without the condescension.
Culture 2014-04-11 13:09:12 +0000
Nathan Dotz

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Culture 2014-04-11 20:18:02 +0000
Edward Finkler

* How we run Python

The Python Software Foundation runs a number of services for the Python community. Come learn how we do it, and how you can help.
Cooking 2014-04-05 03:33:13 +0000
Noah Kantrowitz

* Learn by Making: How We Construct Our Knowledge and Skills

We learn by making things, sharing them, discussing them, and reflecting on them. Let's talk about the intersection of making and education, including constructionism, sharing what you make online, and more.
Culture 2014-03-06 00:25:24 +0000
Josh Bancroft

* Leaving the Web: Portable, Distributed, Programming Without HTML, CSS, or JavaScript

If we could roll back the clock and reinvent the Web platform, what might we come up with?
Chemistry 2014-04-12 06:37:32 +0000
Josh Juran

* Lessons Learned From The Apache Way

The Apache Way is common phrase for the small, but important, list of basic community and development tenets that ensure FOSS project success.
Culture 2014-04-04 17:34:01 +0000
Jim Jagielski

* Minding Bee

We made it to 1000 improvements in 1000 days, then slipped up and actually paid $1000 to one of our users.
Hacks 2014-04-05 06:55:55 +0000
Bethany Soule

* Monitoring and Metrics with Puppet

As your infrastructure grows, so does the complexity of your monitoring and metrics needs. In heterogeneous environments many machines will require different monitoring checks depending on their role in the infrastructure and often times on their physical hardware or lack thereof. The answer to which checks go where is already in your configuration management.
Cooking 2014-03-19 05:29:23 +0000
William Van Hevelingen

* Open Infrastructure for an Open Company

Balanced is opening its infrastructure to the community, learn how and why.
Business 2014-04-05 03:28:45 +0000
Noah Kantrowitz

* Open Source is Enabling us to Tell Better Stories

The conversation in today's media world is shifting away from "how much content can we publish, and how fast?" and toward "how can we provide in-depth engagement with single pieces of content." The emerging realm of digital storytelling means that "messages are not only heard and understood, but inspire, motivate and elicit action." Open source is adding fuel to this fire, and it is getting brighter.
Chemistry 2014-04-11 23:43:55 +0000
Karen Borchert, Chris Strahl

* Rethinking the Single Page Web Application

We were promised a glorious future with RESTful APIs, clients with lighting fast JavaScript engines, and an end to sending UI from the server. Now your project is late, the technical debt is piling up, and you're thinking that hey, Rails wasn't awful. Let's talk about when it's a good idea to build a single page, client side app, and when it's not. I'll be drawing from my experience building a single-app to manage an enterprise software as a service product. Before you jumped into Backbone, Ember, or Angular, you needed to think through the APIs you have, and still had to build. You need to look at the interactions in your UI. You need to figure out where and how your users will access the application.
Cooking 2014-04-11 08:57:43 +0000
Bill Humphries

* Sane Database Change Management with Sqitch

Sqitch is the sane database schema deployment tool. It doesn't care what programming language you use, what framework, or what database engine. Its focuses on tools to facilitate iterative development and ease of deployment, and otherwise stays out of your way. This session provides a technical introduction to Sqitch, with detailed usage examples to help get you started.
Cooking 2014-04-05 23:51:09 +0000
David Wheeler

* Selling Open Source Inside and Out

It is important for us as members of open source communities to not just promote the adoption of open source inside of the companies we work with, but to promote and develop ways for those companies to contribute back to their communities.
Business 2014-04-12 00:07:04 +0000
Chris Strahl

* Slower is Better

One of the most common reasons a team ultimately decides to develop software behind closed doors, rather than using an open-source model, is because they believe working in the open will slow them down. And, frankly, they're right. It really does slow you down. But that is perhaps the best thing that could happen to your project.
Culture 2014-04-12 04:29:14 +0000
Kurt Griffiths

* Stewardship of Open Source Microprojects

System administrators and devops engineers today are writing, sharing, and contributing back to more code than ever before. This has given rise to a new class of Open Source project: the open source microproject.
Culture 2014-04-04 05:31:31 +0000
William Van Hevelingen, Spencer Krum

* Systems programming as a swiss army knife

Why understanding some systems programming basics will make you a better developer.
Cooking 2014-03-28 03:12:24 +0000
Julia Evans

* Teaching Open Source Development in the College Classroom

Having attended the Open Source Bridge the last few years and contributed to open source myself, it is clear that there is a disconnect between open source development and the academic Computer Science world. Students are often intimidated by open source projects because they are run so differently and require a different set of skills than academic projects. This Fall, I will be teaching a course on Open Source development at Pacific University. I want to lay out for you the activities, topics, and projects that I plan on covering to see if these mesh with your experience as open source developers.
Culture 2014-03-21 23:19:26 +0000
Chadd Williams

* The Coder as Artist: Painting with Pixels and Numbers

Popular culture would have us believe that programming and art are polar opposites. In reality, code is just another medium with which we are creating art every day. Learn how embracing code as our art and artists as our community will help us create a more beautiful and accessible world.
Culture 2014-04-05 05:06:15 +0000
Shawna Scott

* Typographical Hacks for LibreOffice

Office suites are as old as the personal computer. Yet, after more than thirty years, few of us have bothered to learn how to use them. Oh, we have learned how to get things done in them. Most of us can format a document and print it out, after a fashion. But what we haven't learned is to do these things efficiently, taking advantage of all the tools that are available. It is as if we have learned enough about cars to go down hill in them and coast across level ground, but never learned about the ignition. We get things done, but with more effort and less efficiency that we should. Some tasks, like going uphill, we don't imagine are even possible because of our limited view. Using any office suite to its full potential means knowing how to design your documents – and nine-tenths of design is knowing how to use styles and templates. Knowing how to use styles and templates is the equivalent of being handed the key to that coasting car and shown the gas pedal – suddenly, you can take full control of the vehicle, instead of getting by on clumsy makeshifts.
Hacks 2014-03-22 03:53:25 +0000
Bruce Byfield

* Unsuck Your Job

There is no reason you have to put up with a job which is unnecessarily stressful, unfulfilling, or just wrong for you. You have the power to make things better. I'm here to show you how.
Business 2014-03-27 04:10:43 +0000
VM Brasseur

* What the WITH? Care and feeding of CTEs

Have you tried some recursion in your SQL? In this session, we will go over the concept of Common Table Expressions (CTE), also known as WITH queries. We will explore syntax, features, and use cases for this powerful SQL construct.
Cooking 2014-04-02 21:36:11 +0000
Michael Alan Brewer

* When Harry Met Iannis - 2014

An exploration of music composed and synthesized by open source software. This piece has been through three incarnations - 2001 (Perl and Sfront), 2004 (Lisp and MIDI) and 2009 - back to Perl and Sfront (https://soundcloud.com/znmeb/sets/when-harry-met-iannis-2009). It's time to revisit 'When Harry Met Iannis' - better algorithms, more modern languages, and more complex instruments.
Cooking 2014-04-12 06:00:39 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Writing Tests To Be Read

Good unit tests can help ensure that your code doesn't break; Great unit tests can teach people how to use it. In this session, you'll learn some tips for making tests readable enough that developers consult them as documentation.
Cooking 2014-04-05 02:56:16 +0000
Moss Collum

* You can be a kernel hacker

Writing operating systems sounds like it's only for wizards, but it turns out that operating systems are written by humans like you and me. I'm going to tell you what a kernel is and why you should care. Then we'll talk about a few concrete ways to get started with kernel hacking, ranging from the super-easy to the terrifyingly difficult.
Chemistry 2014-03-06 17:42:15 +0000
Julia Evans

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* Cool Features of the Z Shell (zsh)

Z Shell is a UNIX shell with a bunch of cool features. Learn about installing and configuring zsh with some of my favorite features.
Cooking
Michael Pigg

* debugging without borders

Debuggers are great when you have intimate access to your codebase, server, and network. Sometimes, all you have is a web browser and some intuition, and you still have a problem to solve. What then?
Cooking
chris mccraw

* Designgineering

Open source software engineering and user interface design got off on the wrong foot. Sadly it’s holding our projects back from reaching their full potential. Let’s talk about how we can bring these seemingly incompatible disciplines together in perfect harmony by simply learning each other’s craft, and how to get started doing so. Whether you are an engineer or a designer you will learn where to get started and how to have fun doing it.
Culture
Trevor Parscal

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* FirefoxOS

FirefoxOS is Mozilla's response to the problems that it sees with the mobile space. Walled gardens, platform fragmentation, and single-purpose SDKs in non-web programming languages threaten to close off the open web from the mobile space. In this presentation I will be covering the basics of FirefoxOS, and how it is the only mobile OS that answers to nobody but you.
Chemistry
Benjamin Kero

* Geek Choir - Fast!

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hacking the academic experience

When I was asked to teach Ruby on Rails at Columbia University I observed that a significant number of the skills required to become a successful professional in the industry are acquired on the job and aren’t being taught in school.
Culture
Emily Stolfo

* Hacking your Meatware: exercises you can do at your desk

You will learn about risks to your neck, shoulders, hips and core from sitting at a keyboard for hours at a time. Learn a quick 6-breath sun salutation, simple stretches, the need for regular movement. Discuss sitting, standing, walking, reclining. Simple, incremental, safe, easy.
Hacks
Kurt Sussman

* How to multiply small integers while <del>Markus</del> human

Thank you! I'm glad someone read the description of this talk on line and remembered to answer Aardvark -- if you hadn't done that, the excerpt wouldn't have actually been part of the talk, and the very fabric of reality could have been threatened!
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Lessons From X

Lessons I've learned from 25 years of participation in perhaps the longest-running end-user-facing Open Source project.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Library of the future: building the Multnomah County Library website

The Multnomah County Library website has combined Drupal, Solr Search, Nginx, Varnish and a host of other technologies to build a highly scalable web infrastructure. The site takes advantage of responsive design techniques to provide patrons—the people who check out the books—with an impressive mobile experience.
Cooking
Joshua Mitchell

* Metrics - What's your code actually doing?

Metrics tell us what our code and our systems are doing and how well they are performing. Proper instrumentation of our systems allows developers and sysadmins to have a better understanding of how code works in production settings.
Cooking
James Burkhart

* Moonlighting in Sunlight

How to deal with legal issues around having a day job and working on open source projects on the side.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Pro Bash Development; Way Beyond Shell Scripting

All Unix/Linux users know a little shell scripting, even if they're unaware of it. Pipes, for example, are a part of the Bash/sh language. Bash/sh, i.e. shell scripting, is usually treated as just that: shell scripting. But if you're crazy enough, you can develop full-blown profession, modular, and tested (yes, tested!) programs in Bash. It takes a little finesse, but I'll show you how, and you just might think twice about using Bash--really using it--in the future.
Hacks
Daniel Nichter

* Product Management in the Open (Source) - community and direction

Product Management is a generally well defined discipline inside large corporate organizations. But how does it work in the open source world? Do we need it? How does product consensus happen in open source?
Business
Larissa Shapiro

* Running with Scissors: Open Source Team Dynamics

Team dynamics are tricky. They're different when you're volunteering your time, when you're working for someone, or when you're trying to build something and invite someone else to build other good things too.
Culture
Amye Scavarda

* Simple Questions Should Have Simple Answers

What happens when a project begins to embrace the philosophy that simple questions should have simple answers? Q: Simple to whom? A: Simple to the person asking the question. "Simple questions should have simple answers" has given me a lot of design clarity in my projects. I hope to convince you of its beneficial effects.
Culture
Michael Schwern

* Smart Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Switching Teams: Moving an Application from MySQL to PostgreSQL

The true life story of switching database backends in our application.
Hacks
Julie Baumler

* The Future of Ruby

What will Ruby, the programming language and community, look like in 2 years?
Culture
Brian Shirai

* The problem with passwords on the web and what to do about it

Handling user passwords safely is hard, but replacing passwords on the web in a reasonable way is even harder. Really, this should have been in the browser all along. This is where Persona comes in.
Chemistry
François Marier

* Unicode Best Practices

Developing applications to handle the natural languages and written scripts of the world—or even a small handful of them—is an impressively large task. Fortunately, Unicode provides tools to do just that. It’s more than just a character set, it’s a collection of standards for working with the world’s textual data. The problem is: Unicode itself is complex!
Cooking
Nova Patch

* What Is That Process Doing?

We're surrounded by programs we didn't write. Inevitably they eventually do the wrong thing, or they just don't do what we need, and we want to find out what they are doing. Learn how to spy on the processes you run.
Chemistry
Greg Price

Favorite proposals for this user

* A Geek's Guide to Race Walking

"It's like the gods descending from Mt. Olympus!" Okay, so your reaction to seeing race walkers might not be as dramatic as Hal's on "Malcolm in the Middle." But from the unconventional gait to the plethora of statistics, there's plenty about this sport to delight geeks. In this session, we'll tell you all about it.
Culture 2013-02-27 19:05:07 +0000
Carmen Jackinsky, Ian Dees

* A Year with Mojolicious, the Perl Web Framework

Mojolicious is a relatively new web framework written in Perl, but I've been using it for a year to power a REST API, two web apps, and a website. In this talk I introduce Mojo and discuss its fun and not so fun parts, particularly in view of using it as the sole backend for a real SaaS-based, PaaS-deployed business. Join this talk and learn about Mojolicious--a fun, new Perl web framework--from someone who's spent a year in the field with it.
Cooking 2013-03-09 01:37:51 +0000
Daniel Nichter

* A/B Testing How-To for Web Applications

Multivariate Testing (also called A/B or Split Testing) lets you determine the best "choice" by showing each choice to a subset of your customers and measuring the results. Of course, you've already heard about it since Google has been doing these sorts of experiments for years, but how to begin? I'll show you the tools you'll need and code you'll write, with plenty of examples. I'll share tips and tricks from the trenches to improving your customer experiments.
Cooking 2013-02-25 19:18:55 +0000
Howard Abrams

* Agile Crafting

Estimating the time a project will take is pretty much the hardest thing in software, and I don't think that's any different for any other crafting deliverable. Of course, sometimes we have done something so often that we KNOW it takes 50 minutes to make a batch of raspberry jam, but that's not the same as estimation. So if we can't rely on our own estimation, or that of others, what can we do? We can timebox from the other direction. Instead of trying to figure out how long something will take, we can decide how long we have to spend on it. After all, you are the boss of your creative experiences. If you don't deliver on time, it's disappointing, but probably not the end of your career.
Hacks 2013-03-01 20:20:52 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Conference Presentation Mind Control

Have you been at a talk which sounded great on paper, but was lackluster in delivery? Have you discovered that some presenters can seem to make *anything* interesting? Do you want to know how to hack audiences to convince them that your talk is *freakin' amazing* even though it's content-challenged? Want to use your conference presentation skills to kickstart your career in world domination? BYO tinfoil hat.
Hacks 2013-03-10 05:06:32 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Digital Nomad: How to stay connected anywhere in the world

For some of us staying connected to the internet is an imperative, and while traveling to foreign lands it can sometimes be difficult to remain connected. Let me share with you some of the techniques that I've discovered for remaining connected while abroad.
Cooking 2013-03-10 04:48:51 +0000
Benjamin Kero

* Fluff: Collaborating to Publish a Fiberarts Magazine Using Open Source Tools

The handspinning community needed an online magazine; we're using open source software to make it happen
Culture 2013-03-24 02:59:06 +0000
Rose White

* Geek Choir - Extended!

An extended, hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture 2013-03-24 02:30:00 +0000
Michael Alan Brewer

* Getting Faster: 5 People Who Sped Up Our World

Everywhere we look our world is speeding up. We have "fast food" and "speed dating". In technology we talk of "sprints", and "continuous deployment". But the search for speed is not a new one and has been going on for centuries. Spanning 300 years we'll discuss 5 people who have spent their lives making things faster and learn how we can apply these concepts to the work we're doing today.
Culture 2013-03-23 18:56:20 +0000
Alex Kroman

* Guerrilla Usability Toolkit

In the age of Agile, it's important for teams to get quick feedback on designs to keep sprints moving, but Omnigraffle wireframes are no match for the rich interactions of the modern web. This represents an opportunity for smart developers to create prototypes with working functionality that can be rapidly tested and changed based on incoming data from teammates and users.
Hacks 2013-03-09 00:00:00 +0000
Chris Watson, Alex Cone

* Hack Your Health With Open Source Tools

The DIY Health Manifesto is an empowerment manual to your own wellness minus the fear mongering and red tape of the American health care establishment. Let's examine the many ways we can measure, control and improve our own health, right here and now, using open source tools and a host of other accessible methods.
Culture 2013-03-21 22:47:47 +0000
Domenika Radonich Leto

* Hacking Conference Tshirts

Know how you get all those great free tshirts at conferences? Don't you hate how they never seem to fit your feminine figure? Or worse yet, all that's left is sizes that are too big or too small! This talk will show easy modifications and alternative uses for those awesome conference tshirts!
Hacks 2013-02-08 17:30:25 +0000
Augustina Blair

* Handcrafted Code? The Programmer in the Age of the Artisan

Culture is diverging in serious and interesting ways. Mass-production is at an all-time high, but a parallel development praises traditional, pre-technological production practices. We lust after devices too shiny to have been made by human hands, and use them to snap photos of organic coffee we insist be roasted less than a mile away. What is the future for programmers in this age? Are we to be replaced eventually by automation, or will there always be a place for "handcrafted code"?
Culture 2013-03-09 23:42:44 +0000
Jonathan Lipps

* Highly Functional Programming (with a Semblance of Reason)

Functional programming is procedural programming without the imperative. Wolf eats the lambda.
Chemistry 2013-03-23 22:41:25 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* Introducing Open Companies

Learn about open companies, a new way to organize work that combines the best of companies with the best of open source.
Business 2013-03-08 21:23:40 +0000
Chad Whitacre

* Lessons Learned from starting an Open Source Office

Twitter recently created an Open Source Office. Throughout this adventure, many lessons were learned and should be shared.
Business 2013-01-22 22:25:05 +0000
Chris Aniszczyk

* Licensing Your Open Source Project

What are the differences between the MIT license and the BSD license? How do you know whether the GPL is compatible with your project and its libraries? What license should you pick for contributors and users? Learn the differences between the major open source licenses and their uses, plus the one license that you shouldn't use if you want major adoption of your work.
Culture 2013-03-06 16:36:49 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Open Source Doesn't Have To Mean Free

At some point in the past, somehow the idea of open source began to mean that it had to be free. Yet some of the best businesses on the web are built on open source technologies and they earn a decent profit. Is this idea at odds with the open source philosophy? In a word, no. Learn why earning a profit from open source isn't bad, and what you should do to make sure your company is a good open source citizen.
Business 2013-03-06 14:48:44 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Open Sourcing Book Publishing

You've got a great idea for a book. You write a publisher. You get accepted! Then you find out that they'll pay you $500 and a 10% royalty for your book rights, in exchange for your heart and soul over the next six months. You're crushed. Is there a better way? There certainly is!
Business 2013-03-06 16:40:03 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Pinoccio - Building an Open Hardware Company, Year 1

From starting an open-hardware business, to designing user-centric products, to running a successful crowdfunding campaign, to managing manufacturing and fulfillment. There are lots of unknowns. We'll cover all the gory details of how we started Pinoccio, including lucky breaks and silly mistakes.
Business 2013-03-20 18:22:29 +0000
Eric Jennings, Sally Carson

* Put the "Ops" in "Dev": What Developers Need to Know About DevOps

With so many tools to insulate us, its difficult to see that luxury can come with hidden costs. Those hidden costs may include security, performance, scalability and maintainability. Startups may let developers lay down the infrastructure which can create some major headaches down the road if done incorrectly.
Culture 2013-03-11 00:24:12 +0000
Lance Albertson, Kenneth Lett, Justin Dugger, Rudy Grigar

* Scientific Computing With Perl

Perl is use widely by scientists and engineers to solve various scientific computing problems, including linear algebra, differential equations and various kinds of minimization problems. In this talk, we will show how to solve various common problems with CPAN modules along with suggestions for best practices. This allows rapid development while avoiding the need to manage memory.
Cooking 2013-03-24 03:49:29 +0000
Duke Leto

* Ten years of FOSS hosting at the OSU Open Source Lab

For the past ten years the OSU Open Source Lab has provided hosting for 150 open source projects from around the world. This session will cover a historical background of the past ten years, an overview of the types of projects we host, what types of hosting we provide, what tools we use and how we provide the hosting. Our audience should be people interested in what's happening at the OSUOSL.
Culture 2013-02-16 05:45:59 +0000
Lance Albertson

* The Apache Way

The Apache Software Foundation is likely the most successful Open Source community out there. In this session, Jim will describe the basic tenets of how Apache projects work: The Apache Way
Culture 2013-03-09 16:04:56 +0000
Jim Jagielski

* The Case for Everyday Crypto

Personal encryption is dearly needed in an increasingly surveilled world. I will talk about the user experience problems and lack of education that prevent widespread adoption and habit-forming of secure communication and circumvention software tools.
Culture 2013-03-30 23:53:18 +0000
Wesley Chen

* The Tao of Project Management (It's Not About The Tools)

It's generally agreed that successful project management is part science, part dark art. This talk gets deeper into the types of people and processes at work that make a project successful.
Business 2013-02-18 23:00:19 +0000
Adam Edgerton

* Unicode Regular Expressions

Modern regular expression engines have been rapidly adding new features for matching and parsing Unicode strings, providing powerful new tools to add to your toolkit.
Chemistry 2013-03-10 07:59:06 +0000
Nova Patch

* What Hath Perl Wrought?

When was the last time you looked at some Perl code? Was it readable? Was it like an archeological expedition, traveling back in time to 1994? Modern Perl is very different from the Perl of our ancestors, and if you've been away for a while, the tools that are available now will blow your mind.
Chemistry 2013-02-19 19:29:48 +0000
Mike Friedman

* What Science Fiction Can Teach Us About Building Communities

Helpful tips about participating in and building open source communities as told through examples of what we can learn about communities from science fiction.
Culture 2013-03-13 15:11:44 +0000
Dawn Foster

* What the Hell Just Happened? How to kill great ideas and alienate everyone by mismanaging your project.

You had the best idea ever. You even had everyone convinced it was the best idea ever. You had a proven plan for project management strategy. But now your best idea is smoldering on the ground, and everyone is running for the exits. What the hell just happened?
Business 2013-03-20 22:27:58 +0000
Chris Chiacchierini

* WHO GIVES A BRAND? What the big fuss is and some branding tools to help you kick ass

Authentic branding that truly communicates your team’s personality, philosophy, and mission connects with your user base in an authentic way. Learn a sure-fire process to uncover your brand and “target audience”.
Business 2013-03-19 22:02:25 +0000
Alicia Nagel