Cameron Adamez's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Balloon & Kite Mapping Workshop

Low-budget, no budget, need aerial images fast? Learn to map with balloons and kites.
Hacks
Mathew Lippincott

* Designgineering

Open source software engineering and user interface design got off on the wrong foot. Sadly it’s holding our projects back from reaching their full potential. Let’s talk about how we can bring these seemingly incompatible disciplines together in perfect harmony by simply learning each other’s craft, and how to get started doing so. Whether you are an engineer or a designer you will learn where to get started and how to have fun doing it.
Culture
Trevor Parscal

* Dirty Tricks of Computer Hardware: What You Don't Know Will (Probably Not) Kill You

Ever wonder what you don't know about how your computer hardware really works? Do you tire of lying to your relatives that "gremlins" are the cause of intermittent data loss and blue screens, and not just a car from the 1970s? Let's take a journey into the wonderful world of wonky hardware and find out what can be done about it!
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* DIY Electric Vehicles

Everybody today has heard of electric vehicles, yet almost nobody has ever seen one, touched one, or driven one. I think this is a shame and would like to correct that. Come join me for 45 minutes of explanation and demonstration about the basics of electric vehicles from electric bicycles all the way to passenger vehicles. Building these vehicles at home is easily within the realm of anybody unafraid to pick up a few simple tools and learn a few basic concepts.
Hacks
Benjamin Kero

* DIY: Creativity and Open Source

Panelists will discuss their uses of open source tools in creative applications, from design to art to hardware.
Culture
Melissa Chavez, Sarah Sharp, Cloë Latchkey, Cameron Adamez

* Expanding Your Empathy

I believe empathy is the core competency that is missing from much of the efforts to push the tech community in a direction towards more diversity of all kinds. Companies, communities and conferences cannot expect everything to magically change until they're willing to go deep and examine the systemic patterns and structures that keep underrepresented communities from feeling safe and welcome in the tech space.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Failure and Wikipedia: how encyclopedias work

This talk is about my experience with promoting Wikipedia in Indian languages, OpenGLAM projects in India and the problems I've encountered. I also want to draw parallels to how the encyclopedia project itself, especially online works on notions of rough consensus, thereby articulating a specific political position for the community and reflecting a world view through the knowledge they produce.
Culture
noopur raval

* FiveUI: Open-source UX tests for the common good

Testing User Interfaces is hard! FiveUI [1] is here to help. While FiveUI happens to provide a handy framework for doing headless and interactive UI testing; it is really intended for sharing tests and sharing a framework for executing them. FiveUI consists of a browser extension (for Firefox and Google Chrome), a headless batch system, and a set of UI consistency guidelines. The guidelines are written in JSON and Javascript such that they remain readable and understandable to human developers, without being tied to a specific application. The guidelines can be checked on an individual web page by hand using the browser extensions, or on an entire website using the headless system. [1] http://galoisinc.github.com/FiveUI/
Cooking
Benjamin Jones, Rogan Creswick

* Geek Choir - Fast!

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hacking your Meatware: exercises you can do at your desk

You will learn about risks to your neck, shoulders, hips and core from sitting at a keyboard for hours at a time. Learn a quick 6-breath sun salutation, simple stretches, the need for regular movement. Discuss sitting, standing, walking, reclining. Simple, incremental, safe, easy.
Hacks
Kurt Sussman

* How My Kids Are Learning to Program By Talking

My children have patiently tolerated a number of teach-STEM-quick schemes their dad has brought home. They've taught robots to dance, created simple animations using Scratch, and, quite frankly, made a lot of poop jokes. What's missing from these programming tools was storytelling. The ones we tried focused either on easy interactivity or expressive power. If only there were a way to combine the two... oh, wait, there was—46 years ago!
Culture
Ian Dees

* Just Don't Lick the Cookie: an open discussion about organizational dysfunction

When someone claims a task and then doesn't do anything with it, we call that "licking the cookie." Nobody in their right mind would pick up and eat the licked cookie or finish the project. In this session well talk about common forms of organizational dysfunction, and then facilitate a group discussion about working around, over, under or through organizational dysfunctions you've encountered.
Culture
Kellie Brownell, Sumana Harihareswara

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Lessons From X

Lessons I've learned from 25 years of participation in perhaps the longest-running end-user-facing Open Source project.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Let The Internet Work For You

Creating a successful Open Source project isn’t intuitive, or easy. Converting a brilliant idea into a working code base, then publishing it to Github (with significant adoption) is hard enough, nevermind building an ideal development and release workflow. Sometimes, getting your OSS code out to the community is the easy part -- then the real work ensues. Juggling between the roles of; creator, maintainer and contributor while managing the interests of the group effort (IRC, mailing lists etc) and issue trackers can quickly scale from simple and exciting, to a time consuming full time job. I plan to take you on a ride, demonstrating how Open Source developers can leverage free service offerings (for open source) to make your life as a project maintainer easier and more rewarding; from development and QA automation through to continuous deployment.
Cooking
Sebastian Tiedtke

* Leveling up in DevOps: the Art of Bad Shell Scripts

What are the core differences in a DevOps intern, a beginner DevOpsian, and a senior DevOpsian?
Culture
Emily Slocombe

* Library of the future: building the Multnomah County Library website

The Multnomah County Library website has combined Drupal, Solr Search, Nginx, Varnish and a host of other technologies to build a highly scalable web infrastructure. The site takes advantage of responsive design techniques to provide patrons—the people who check out the books—with an impressive mobile experience.
Cooking
Joshua Mitchell

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Polling: It's Good Enough for the WWW & It's Good Enough for You

Lately everyone loves pushing: you get push notifications on your iOS device, cloud to device messages on your Android device, and something about web sockets. Pushing seems natural. "Hey! I have some data for you, let me send it to you," says the pusher. Too bad it doesn't scale effectively.
Cooking
Jessica Lynn Suttles

* Remote Pair Programming

Remote Pair Programming: my setup, some advice, and a live demo^H^H stress test
Cooking
Sam Livingston-Gray

* Robotron Autopsy: Learning About Hardware From Vintage Video Games

Studying and building hardware is easier than you think. Using software concepts as a metaphor, I will reverse-engineer the 1982 arcade game machine "Robotron: 2084" and reimplement it in modern hardware.
Hacks
Jared Boone

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

* Search-first writing for non-writers

Search-first writing makes you think about the structure of your document and product as a series of topics, instead of a big book. The days of linear documentation are over, or at least numbered. Users are much more likely to come to documentation through searches. As an open source creator, you may not have a writer to help you out with this, so how can you maximize their return on your minimal investment?
Cooking
Heidi Waterhouse

* Shall We Play A Game?

In just 1.5 hours, I will help you craft a computer game AI that will consistently beat you and your friends.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Sharing Beyond "Sharing": Fostering an Open Sharing Culture in the Philippines

Filipinos are known for sharing. From chain text messages, to photos, to videos, even to gossip and covering recent events in our own little communities, there seems to be an openness to sharing information: in fact, the Philippines is the so-called "social networking capital of the world". But can this openness to sharing information translate into the open source movement? I seek to provide possible answers to that question.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Study Design: the best model for a cat is... a cat!

With good study design you can state how confident you are that you have a cat. You can hypothesis test your cat--is my cat like other cats or is it a dog? You can even design an experiment to determine the correct feeding time for your cat.
Chemistry
Mary Anne Thygesen

* Test Driven Development with AngularJS

Learn how to practice test driven development in JavaScript using AngularJS
Cooking
Joe Eames

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Using Secure Boot for the powers of good

Secure Boot is a technology for limiting the files that computers will boot. Used wrongly, it restricts user freedom and turns computers into appliances. How can we use it for real improvements in security without losing the ideals of general purpose computing?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

Favorite proposals for this user

* A/B Testing How-To for Web Applications

Multivariate Testing (also called A/B or Split Testing) lets you determine the best "choice" by showing each choice to a subset of your customers and measuring the results. Of course, you've already heard about it since Google has been doing these sorts of experiments for years, but how to begin? I'll show you the tools you'll need and code you'll write, with plenty of examples. I'll share tips and tricks from the trenches to improving your customer experiments.
Cooking 2013-02-25 19:18:55 +0000
Howard Abrams

* Agile Crafting

Estimating the time a project will take is pretty much the hardest thing in software, and I don't think that's any different for any other crafting deliverable. Of course, sometimes we have done something so often that we KNOW it takes 50 minutes to make a batch of raspberry jam, but that's not the same as estimation. So if we can't rely on our own estimation, or that of others, what can we do? We can timebox from the other direction. Instead of trying to figure out how long something will take, we can decide how long we have to spend on it. After all, you are the boss of your creative experiences. If you don't deliver on time, it's disappointing, but probably not the end of your career.
Hacks 2013-03-01 20:20:52 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* cassis.js: Code That Runs in both JS & PHP - Natively

This talk is about how I use language hacks to run the same code natively on PHP and Javascript (JS), which I call CASSIS for Client And Server Scripting Implementation Subset. I'll describe how I discovered CASSIS, how to use the open source library cassis.js to write middleware logic once for both client & server, and real-world use cases including where I've successfully deployed cassis.js for years (even as an essential part of my own site tantek.com).
Hacks 2013-03-22 00:13:53 +0000
Tantek Çelik

* Come Make a Map: Completely Custom, Open Source Maps with TileMill

Map making doesn't have to be hard. Anyone can do it. And we'll show you how, using the open source design studio TileMill. Come make a map!
Cooking 2013-03-22 19:03:44 +0000
Justin Miller

* Cryptography: Demystified

Understanding and Trusting Cryptography
Cooking 2013-02-17 23:26:22 +0000
Renning Bruns

* Driving Open Data - Dragging 20th Century Institutions into the 21st Century

Most open data comes from organizations that are already open, or want to be open. How do we access the massive amount of data locked in institutions with no incentive for openness?
Business 2013-03-23 06:20:53 +0000
Ryan Urabe

* Fluff: Collaborating to Publish a Fiberarts Magazine Using Open Source Tools

The handspinning community needed an online magazine; we're using open source software to make it happen
Culture 2013-03-24 02:59:06 +0000
Rose White

* Getting more women to be a part of FOSS

The FOSS statistic of male vs female contributors is really shocking and for absolutely no definite reason should this be so. Wouldn't it be fair for all and a great thing to happen if the ratio could be brought close to 50-50? Why so less number of female contributors in FOSS? What are they scared about?
Culture 2013-01-20 07:12:07 +0000
Priyanka Nag

* Guerrilla Open Source

Come hear tales of how Open Source can survive, and even thrive, within the confines of some of the world's largest technology companies.
Business 2013-03-09 08:50:29 +0000
Joshua Ballanco

* Hack Your Health With Open Source Tools

The DIY Health Manifesto is an empowerment manual to your own wellness minus the fear mongering and red tape of the American health care establishment. Let's examine the many ways we can measure, control and improve our own health, right here and now, using open source tools and a host of other accessible methods.
Culture 2013-03-21 22:47:47 +0000
Domenika Radonich Leto

* Hacking Conference Tshirts

Know how you get all those great free tshirts at conferences? Don't you hate how they never seem to fit your feminine figure? Or worse yet, all that's left is sizes that are too big or too small! This talk will show easy modifications and alternative uses for those awesome conference tshirts!
Hacks 2013-02-08 17:30:25 +0000
Augustina Blair

* Janus wasn’t a bad guy: Solving real problems using a key-value store inside a relational database.

We demonstrate how we used hstore inside a Postgres database to elegantly solve the problem of generating solid business-intelligence from the dregs of emailed PDF and Excel files.
Chemistry 2013-03-11 20:18:46 +0000
Laurie Kemmerer, Dave Miller, Ravi Gadad

* Licensing Your Open Source Project

What are the differences between the MIT license and the BSD license? How do you know whether the GPL is compatible with your project and its libraries? What license should you pick for contributors and users? Learn the differences between the major open source licenses and their uses, plus the one license that you shouldn't use if you want major adoption of your work.
Culture 2013-03-06 16:36:49 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Linux Containers: You probably didn't need a VM anyway

Containerization is an often overlooked option for when one needs to solve a problem typically involving the need to create temporary machines to test things or to logically separate machines. I'm here to show you how you can do all this from your laptop without burning your lap, requiring an hour and a half for installation, or filing bugs against IT folks or forking over cash for more cloud instances. Let me explain why LXC is the best option for testing new software and is also an excellent option for taking advantage of production hardware. Topics covered will be basic concepts, installing, cloning, and destroying containers as well as advanced concepts and stupid tricks.
Cooking 2013-03-10 04:26:42 +0000
Benjamin Kero

* Noise detected using arduino

Getting Started with Arduino using Linux, controling LEDs and sense.
Hacks 2013-02-27 20:24:03 +0000
Julita Inca

* On Freelancing: Opensource == Food?

We all love great opensource projects and great food, and luckily one can make the other for us!
Business 2013-03-05 13:44:17 +0000
Martha Chumo

* Open Sourcing Book Publishing

You've got a great idea for a book. You write a publisher. You get accepted! Then you find out that they'll pay you $500 and a 10% royalty for your book rights, in exchange for your heart and soul over the next six months. You're crushed. Is there a better way? There certainly is!
Business 2013-03-06 16:40:03 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Opposing Authority in Open Source

In this talk I'll showcase insights we can garner from left wing anti-establishment movements such as community radio stations, unions and cooperatives and how you can use those techniques to grow, scale and manage open source communities, while still dismantling the authority.
Culture 2013-03-08 22:08:57 +0000
Francesca Krihely

* Pinoccio - Building an Open Hardware Company, Year 1

From starting an open-hardware business, to designing user-centric products, to running a successful crowdfunding campaign, to managing manufacturing and fulfillment. There are lots of unknowns. We'll cover all the gory details of how we started Pinoccio, including lucky breaks and silly mistakes.
Business 2013-03-20 18:22:29 +0000
Eric Jennings, Sally Carson

* Put people first: Navigating the bazaar of open source libraries

npm has almost 25,000 packages. CPAN has over 114,000 modules. Drupal has over 20,000 add-ons, and there are 23,000+ plugins just at Wordpress.org. Where does one start? Put people first.
Culture 2013-03-10 05:12:51 +0000
Rob Martin

* Put the "Ops" in "Dev": What Developers Need to Know About DevOps

With so many tools to insulate us, its difficult to see that luxury can come with hidden costs. Those hidden costs may include security, performance, scalability and maintainability. Startups may let developers lay down the infrastructure which can create some major headaches down the road if done incorrectly.
Culture 2013-03-11 00:24:12 +0000
Lance Albertson, Kenneth Lett, Justin Dugger, Rudy Grigar

* The Case for Everyday Crypto

Personal encryption is dearly needed in an increasingly surveilled world. I will talk about the user experience problems and lack of education that prevent widespread adoption and habit-forming of secure communication and circumvention software tools.
Culture 2013-03-30 23:53:18 +0000
Wesley Chen

* The Fourth 'R'

As technology continues to grow at an increasing rate, why is our educational system stuck in a pre-technology age? Why is programming rarely taught even at the higher levels of schooling? Why do stereotypes of the isolated, nerdy programmer continue to linger, driving away smart, creative people from computer science degrees?
Culture 2013-03-24 05:17:42 +0000
Davy Stevenson

* The Social Web has become a Hostile Web and How We Start Fixing That

There's a bodega across the street from the loft where my partner and I live. To get there, I walk out the door and up to a crosswalk, there's a button that activates warning lights indicating that someone's in the crosswalk which I press, and then cross the busy street. I walk into the market, get a six pack of my favorite IPA, pay cash for it, and return home. Now, let's go shopping online! Here's a suggested list of steps for using a browser safely as given by the CTO of a security company. And this list only covers browsing, not shopping. # Uninstall client-side Java. # All browser plugins should NOT auto-run, instead configured to "click-to-play." # Install security and privacy protecting add-ons including Adblock, Disconnect, Ghostery, Collusion, and NoScript. # this list continues for several more steps... I'd also suggest installing some software that alerts you to unexpected outgoing requests your computer is making. And all of this before typing anything into the URL bar, or the search box (by the way, did you turn autocomplete off?) All of those steps are like having to put on body armor, hard hat, safety googles, and goalie pads just to cross the street to my local market. Worst of all, I have to understand the underpinnings of the web to see why I'd want to take those steps. Something's gone terribly wrong with the web.
Business 2013-03-24 00:22:42 +0000
Bill Humphries

* Thinking inside the box: Using Things of the Internet to monitor the Internet of Things.

Why use closed source or closed platform tools to monitor the "Internet of Things" when the sysadmin community has been using open source monitoring tools for years?
Cooking 2013-03-24 04:29:14 +0000
Donald Delmar Davis

* What Hath Von Neumann Wrought?

I've sub-titled this presentation "skeptical musings of a reluctant cyborg." I'm mostly going to talk about computational journalism, but don't be surprised if some science fiction finds its way into the discussion.
Culture 2013-03-24 03:38:55 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Why Should a Student Click that "EDIT" Button?

Why should a student click that EDIT button? I would like to discuss how contributing to various Wikimedia Project benefits the students and why they should care about it.
Culture 2013-03-15 19:05:36 +0000
Arnav Sonara

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Snapshot of Open Source in West Africa

Ever wonder why Wikipedia fund raising focuses that much on Africa? Are you curious about what Open Source means for West Africans? What it is used for and where it is going? Join to hear real world examples about us trying to build communities and businesses around open source in West Africa.
Business
Renaud Gaudin

* Accessibility in Mobile Platforms: Bridging Divides

Mobile devices are changing the way we interact with the web, both as media consumers and social beings. We will explore the opportunities and challenges this change brings to users with disabilities.
Chemistry
Eitan Isaacson

* Anti-Censorship Best Practices: How to Make Keeping it up Easy and Taking it Down Hard

What do bananas have to do with censorship? What do polyamorous people have in common with fax machines? How can you help your ideas have cyber-sex? In this far-reaching seminar, join Social Justice Technologist and free software developer maymay as he explains the 101's of how to make keeping your content up easy and taking it down hard. More important than merely a crash-course on tools, learn the fundamentals of how to build anti-censorship techniques directly into your publishing process using nothing more technologically complex than copy-and-paste. Whether you're a non-technical individual or a savvy multi-national organization, you'll discover how you can put data portability, distributed publishing, and censorship circumvention tactics to use right away in order to stay one step ahead of those who would call you "obscene."
Culture
Meitar Moscovitz

* Building the Open Source Battle Rifle

A look at the technical and legal issues surrounding home construction of firearms, focusing on semi-automatic AK-47 style rifles.
Hacks
Beth Flanagan

* Cutting Through the Crap: The Essence of Content on the Future Web

The mobile revolution has shown us that our content management and web publishing technologies are entangled and flawed. But by thinking deeply and re-examining the essence of our content, we can help to architect a flexible future for the web.
Chemistry
Lyza Gardner

* Design and Command Line Applications

Design has permeated our culture and our tools, but the software you're building doesn't have a graphical interface. That doesn't exempt you from thinking about user experience design! Learn how UX principles apply to even basic command line scripts.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Don't Fear Unicode

Unicode isn’t new, but it still seems hard when your starting at the beginning and haven’t even been told the difference between a glyph, a codepoint, a character and a byte. Every year there are talks and tutorials at conferences about it, but if you haven’t grasped the basics, you can feel frustrated and lost much too quickly. This talk will cover the essentials of Unicode, locale and how they affect things like regular expressions, reading and writing files and sending data out to the world. Perl will be the programming language used to demonstrate these ideas, but much of the content should be accessible to all programmers.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson

* How and When to Do It Wrong

Constraints make good art. Everyone knows the right way to design and implement software — but is the wrong way really so bad? This talk demonstrates unconventional approaches to solving common and real problems and explores their benefits and drawbacks.
Hacks
Chromatic X

* How Much Work Does it Take and What Is it Like to Integrate an Android SW Stack on a Gadget?

We all know about the Android Open Source project and that in theory anyone can make an android device with their very own customised AOSP ROM. But, what is it like to work on something using AOSP. How deep is that rabbit hole anyway?
Hacks
Mark Gross

* How to Encrypt Your Content on Any Website: Privly

Privly lets you post content on the web (Facebook, Gmail, Twitter, Diaspora, ..., everywhere) without letting host sites have access to your data. Come find out how to un-send emails and manage your data across many websites simultaneously.
Hacks
Sean McGregor, Sanchit Karve, Jennifer Davidson

* Keynote: Fear, Uncertainty, and Dopamine

Beer, cookies, psychopathy, happiness, regret—these are all things the world's greatest scientists have studied in detail. Learn how humans work, and how to get the most out of interacting with them.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Logic Lessons That Last Generations

In the 1980s, my grandfather reached onto the bookshelves of his cigar-smoke-seasoned garage laboratory and pulled down a three-ring binder that would change my life. Come hear how a 50-year-old introduction to binary logic has managed to stay relevant after all these decades, and what it means for our own efforts to teach and document technical subjects.
Culture
Ian Dees

* Lye: How a Musician Built a Music Box

Musicians tend to demand specialized tools for computer-aided music generation. Come listen to me dissect a tool I wrote to satisfy my needs.
Chemistry
Corbin Simpson

* Model Data Without Making Tables — A Pervasive Linked Data Stack

Want to be agile? Why bother modeling your data with a static table, declaring classes, and setting up mapping from tables to objects and finally to HTML and back again? The linked data standard presents a more powerful data model, and lets you use your website itself as a database.
Chemistry
Leif Warner

* Open Education Tools for Mentoring and Learning

The internet is full of information. Some of this information was made to help people learn. A subset exists under open licenses. These open educational resources (OERs) are used all over the world for learning and teaching. This talk will cover what some of them are and explore ways they have been (and can be) used for mentors and self-learners--both as individuals and in peer-study groups.
Culture
Molly de Blanc

* Open Source and Intellectual Property - Busting [some of] the Myths

"If it's open source, that means it's public domain, right?" "Well, it's fair use if you only copy 5% of it." "I know, let's get a trademark and then nobody can use our idea!" A discussion of common myths about intellectual property and how it applies to open source.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen

* Pro-Style Code Review

Code review is awesome. Do more of it.
Business
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Rise of the Indie Web

Meet the pioneers of the new Indie Web, learn what's changed, and how you too can reclaim your content, your data, your online identity. Join our panelists as they debate a variety of different approaches and learn how you too can get started and join the new Indie Web.
Culture
Tantek Çelik

* Text Lacks Empathy

Have you ever written a nice friendly email and gotten a reply that seems like they read a whole different email? Textual communication has special problems. This talk will help you mitigate them: ensuring that what you mean to say is what is understood; interpreting messages that seem totally out of whack; and increasing empathic bandwidth.
Culture
Michael Schwern, Noirin Plunkett

* The Art of Open Source DJing

Conditions are rough for an aspiring DJ. More and more venues are starting to care if their performers have a license for their music, and the cost of software, hardware, and music is often more than they would care to spend. Thankfully one does not have to sacrifice on quality when replacing two of these with gratis components.
Hacks
Benjamin Kero

* The Bacomatic 5000: Migrating from Arduino/AVR to ARM Using Libmaple

Using open source hardware and software I will present migration paths from the Arduino to a more powerful architecture without significant cost increase or having to relearn everything.
Chemistry
Donald Davis

* Thriving in Chaos: An Introduction to Systems Thinking

For centuries we have learned to solve problems with a linear approach. This originated with Isaac Newton in the sevententh century and assumes that everything in the world is connected through cause and effect. Systems thinking throws away that assumption and examines the universe as small pieces connected into a complex network. You will learn how a systems thinking approach can be used to create robust groups that don't have leaders.
Culture
Alex Kroman

* Understand "Inform 7" as Teh Awesome.

Y'know those "Interactive Fiction" (IF) text-adventure thingies? Inform 7 is a language for writing IF in the style of English prose. It's also a neat idea for general modeling. Let's build a simple world together while learning some of what Inform 7 is about.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Using XMonad for a No-Nonsense, Highly Productive Linux Desktop Experience

Many Linux desktop environments try to be easy to use for the average user, but that's not you. You're at your computer all day writing code; you don't want to mess around with *dragging windows* or (ugh) watching *animated transitions*. David Brewer will demonstrate how by using xmonad, a tiling window manager, you can free yourself from the tyranny of the mouse.
Cooking
David Brewer

* When Google Maps Gives You Lemons, Make Lemonade

Make your life sweeter by replacing Google Maps with open-source alternatives.
Cooking
Wm Leler

Favorite proposals for this user

* Stack up the Stacks: a Comparison of Modern Web Development Tools.

Comparing RoR, Node.js, Django, Lift, and Spring MVC in code.
Chemistry 2012-03-28 15:12:03 +0000
Nick Muhonen

* Dear Lazyconference, let's talk about your favorite web application framework.

Me: experienced Symfony 1 developer trying to decide whether to make the jump to Symfony 2 or to another web application framework. You: opinionated and passionate users of other MVC-style frameworks. Together we'll form an impromptu un-panel to compare and contrast our toolkits.
Cooking 2012-03-13 19:57:26 +0000
David Brewer

* Fighting meatware bit-rot at your desk

Sitting with your arms and attention forward shortens and tightens your pectorals, and doing nothing with your upper back unbalances the muscles that keep the bones in your shoulders and arms aligned. This makes your shoulders easier to to injure during your frisbee golf game. So let's do something to engage your upper back. This will also give you a sense of how your back and shoulders might feel when your upper body posture is aligned...
Culture 2012-01-19 18:19:21 +0000
Kurt Sussman

* Handcrafted Code: The Device Paradigm and Implications for Developers

The Technological Age has seen the reshaping of the physical and social realities of our world like no other. Since the dawn of the Enlightenment, modern technology (before it even existed) has been heralded as our salvation from a variety of evils (disease, starvation, burdensome labor, boredom, etc...). The philosophy of technology seeks to understand this trend and the relation of technology to science, culture, and nature.
Culture 2012-03-30 00:43:20 +0000
Jonathan Lipps

* I own that file. I can prove it.

Scenario: You're the lead in a team software project for school. One week from the deadline, you get a call from the Dean. Somebody's taken your project requirements document and uploaded it to rent-a-l33t-coder.com. Your fingerprints are all over the doc. You're accused of cheating and threatened with expulsion from school. What do you do?
Hacks 2012-03-14 23:28:51 +0000
Daniel Sauble

* Life, Zen, and the API

The concept of the API, we all know it, we all use it, but do we really understand it? This talk seeks to deconstruct the API and discuss it's usefulness for everything from your web app, to your coffee, to your marriage
Chemistry 2012-02-11 00:48:14 +0000
John Metta

* Opening Open Source: Making Your Project Friendly to Everyone

Many open source projects run into the question: how do we get more people involved? How do we grow our contributors? How do we make our community more diverse?
Culture 2012-02-28 19:38:27 +0000
Pam Selle

* Pirate Radio and Open Source: The power of subversive technology

Running a radio station is hard, but OSS software helps to fill the gaps. Hear about how House of Sound, Portland's largest free-form radio station (with around 40 DJs per week) uses open source software to solve hard problems like archiving shows, doing playback, improving audio quality, and streaming to the masses on a budget. I'll also talk about the share culture of pirate radio, how it's similar to OSS, and why I think the pirate radio movement has a very important role in the future of our culture.
Culture 2012-03-30 18:56:04 +0000
Kyle Drake

* Reading Rainbow: How to Read Code and Documentation

One of the best methods for learning new coding techniques is to read open source code. However, unlike normal books, code isn't meant to be read from top to bottom, beginning to end. Instead, code is more like a choose-your-own-adventure book, where each function can take you down a different path. I'll highlight some well documented open source projects, what makes them easy to get started for readers, and how to get started learning a new technology. For veteran developers, this talk will point out common pitfalls in documentation and how to avoid them for beginners.
Culture 2012-03-21 18:30:03 +0000
Jerry Cheung

* Small business mistakes

You have a great business idea and your friends and colleagues are supportive and tell you that you can do it. The forms have been filled in, you've said goodbye to your rat-race job, and you're investing your energy into getting things done. Still, despite how compelling your idea is, you're not making any money and your savings are dwindling. What are you doing wrong? Come to this talk to find out a list of common small business mistakes.
Business 2012-03-27 05:18:07 +0000
Jacinta Richardson

* Take a code break, and hack your brain with a foreign language!

How I used free, available and Open Source technology for 1 year and 3 months to teach myself a conversational level of German. It can be applied to learning any foreign language, and anyone can do it!
Hacks 2012-03-31 01:15:55 +0000
Adam Christian

* The Mathematics of Human-Computer Interaction

Why do most computer interfaces flop? Why do so few succeed? Is it magic, or is there a method to the madness? Learn about some of the mathematical underpinnings of human-computer interaction, starting with Fitts' law in one-dimension and ending with the Accot-Zhai steering law in two.
Chemistry 2012-03-14 22:30:54 +0000
Daniel Sauble

* What Open Education Can Learn From Open Source

While FLOSS projects aim to acquire contributors, Open Education projects look to acquire users. This talk will look at the current state of Open Education, FLOSS projects are successful in both open and functional contexts, and what FLOSS can do for open education.
Culture 2012-03-30 16:39:40 +0000
Molly de Blanc