Igal Koshevoy's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Crash Course in Tech Management

'Programmer' and 'Manager' are two different titles for a reason: they're two different jobs and skill sets. If you have managerial aspirations (or have had them foisted upon you), come to this session to learn some of the tricks of the managerial trade.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Adventures in Hipster Programming: Solving a Math Puzzle Using a Genetic Algorithm Programmed in OCaml

I heard Will Shortz pose a mathematical puzzle on NPR on a Sunday Morning in January and I thought, "Hey, I can solve that with a genetic algorithm!" In OCaml. I'll show you how in this talk.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* An Introduction to Luvit

Luvit is a new open source asynchronous framework. We will dive into what this project does, how it works, and what the goals are for the future.
Chemistry
Brandon Philips

* Bring Out the GIMP, Open Source Art Programs and Their Value in Both Tech and the Professional Artist Community

We have come to a point where nearly everyone is expected to have at least cursory knowledge of graphics applications, and rather than shell out $650 for a program you’re primarily interested in using for editing screenshots many in the tech community knows to download GIMP and use that $650 to fuel their caffeine and online gaming addictions. Unfortunately this is not the case with artists. From the moment you enter art school you’re chained to proprietary applications and I know I don’t have to proselytize to you lot about that. So we end up with one group of people being paid to use a free program for the most rudimentary of tasks and we have a second group of people who could be exploiting the most bleeding edge features of that program, but who are instead spending money they don’t have on products they may not need. There’s also the option to pirate those applications, but that’s a whole other talk.
Culture
Cloë Latchkey

* Building Developer Platforms

How do you transform your site or service into a platform others build on top of? How do you clear the path, lower the barriers, and make it easy for new developers to get started?
Chemistry
Scott Becker

* Building the Open Source Battle Rifle

A look at the technical and legal issues surrounding home construction of firearms, focusing on semi-automatic AK-47 style rifles.
Hacks
Beth Flanagan

* Building Web Apps with Clojure

Get ready for a whirlwind tour of the current Clojure ecosystem of web app technologies. This talk will demonstrate how fast, responsive apps can be built on this up-and-coming functional language, which is based on Lisp and runs on the JVM.
Cooking
Scott Becker

* Comparing Open Source Private Cloud Platforms

Private cloud computing has become an integral part of global business. While each platform provides a way for virtual machines to be deployed, implementations vary widely. It can be difficult to determine which features are right for your needs. This session will discuss the top open source private cloud platforms and provide analysis on which one is the best fit for you.
Chemistry
Lance Albertson

* Cutting Through the Crap: The Essence of Content on the Future Web

The mobile revolution has shown us that our content management and web publishing technologies are entangled and flawed. But by thinking deeply and re-examining the essence of our content, we can help to architect a flexible future for the web.
Chemistry
Lyza Gardner

* Data-driven Interfaces on the Web Using Clojure

C2: A declarative visualization library written in Clojure for building interactive, data-driven interfaces on the web
Chemistry
Kevin Lynagh

* Dread Free Continuous Deployment Using Dreadnot

Learn how to use Dreadnot, an open source deployment orchestration tool creating using Node.js and Twitter Bootstrap, to integrate with a variety of integration and infrastructure tools to enable rolling deployments with the click of a button.
Cooking
Russell Haering

* Experiences from Building a Science Cloud with OpenStack

How to tame your OpenStack installation for a production environment.
Chemistry
Chris Hoge

* Forking and Refining Data on the Open Web

Github has revolutionized social coding but where does social data stand in relation?
Chemistry
Max Ogden

* Future of Wearable Computing: Constraint, Context and Location

Google will release a wearable heads up display this fall, and it may help to usher in a new era of augmented reality and wearable computing. What does this mean for us? How do we build for the next generation of machines? Who was here before us, and how can we learn from them?
Hacks
Amber Case

* Go Go Gallimaufry

At one point it was popular to refer to the eyes as windows to the soul, and common wisdom accepted that you could learn a great deal about a person's inner thoughts by looking at their eyes. Then that notion fell out of fashion, except perhaps in love songs. But once we learned how to track people's eye motions, record them, and analyse the data, we realized that there may have been something to it.
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* How and When to Do It Wrong

Constraints make good art. Everyone knows the right way to design and implement software — but is the wrong way really so bad? This talk demonstrates unconventional approaches to solving common and real problems and explores their benefits and drawbacks.
Hacks
Chromatic X

* Identity, Reputation and Gratitude: Designing for a Community

How is Wikipedia designing its user experiences? In a larger sense, how do you design for a collaborative community -- the type of social network where people make things together? Brandon Harris, senior designer for the Wikimedia Foundation, explains.
Chemistry
Brandon Harris

* Libuv: The Power Underneath Node.js

Learn about the magic that powers nodejs and has enabled other projects to do cross platform non blocking io goodness.
Chemistry
Brandon Philips

* Machine Learning in the Open

Machine learning and data mining methods underlie many exciting products and services, but their underlying workings remain opaque to many, even developers. I will provide a brief tutorial on some of the most important concepts and methods from machine learning and data mining, with motivating examples and illustrations from open source tools. Particular emphasis will be placed on learning methods and their appropriate use.
Cooking
John Taylor

* Outreach Events: My Triumphs, My Mistakes

We all love sprinting with other experts, but how do you design an event effectively to reach out to and train newbies? It takes more work than you might think (publicity, prep, structure, and followup), but here's how.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Asheesh Laroia

* Practical Lessons from Exotic Languages

Esoteric programming languages never really get the attention they deserve in the mainstream programming culture. We'll examine idioms from several exotic languages and explain how they can improve the quality of more common codebases.
Cooking
Corbin Simpson

* Pro-Style Code Review

Code review is awesome. Do more of it.
Business
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Put the "Ops" in "Dev": What Developers Need to Know About DevOps

How thinking about operations can help you make your code better, stronger, and faster.
Cooking
Greg Lund-Chaix, Lance Albertson, Rudy Grigar, Kenneth Lett

* Text Lacks Empathy

Have you ever written a nice friendly email and gotten a reply that seems like they read a whole different email? Textual communication has special problems. This talk will help you mitigate them: ensuring that what you mean to say is what is understood; interpreting messages that seem totally out of whack; and increasing empathic bandwidth.
Culture
Michael Schwern, Noirin Plunkett

* The Style of Style Guides

When you code, should you indent 2, 4 or 8 characters? Where should you put the braces? What should your variables and functions be named? Is it worth having an argument about any of this? This talk offers an analytical approach to deciding which elements of style will benefit your code. We'll discover which is the "best style" and which is the style you should use.
Chemistry
Michael Schwern

* Wireless Communication with an Open Source Software Radio

You use wireless technology every day. Do you want to know how it works?
Chemistry
Jared Boone

Open Source Bridge 2011 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* DevOps, Cloud, Automation and more! (Part 1 of 2)

Lightning talks and discussions on devops best practices, cloud infrastructures, and automation tools.
BOF
Igal Koshevoy, James Turnbull, James Loope

* DevOps, Cloud, Automation and more! (Part 2 of 2)

Lightning talks and discussions on devops best practices, cloud infrastructures, and automation tools. [continuation of earlier BoF]
BOF
James Turnbull, Igal Koshevoy, James Loope

* Functional Languages BoF [pdxfunc]

Hang out and talk about functional languages.
BOF
Igal Koshevoy, Dan Colish, David Lazar

* Ruby BoF [pdxruby]

Lightning talks and discussions about Ruby-related libraries, projects, implementations and more.
BOF
Igal Koshevoy

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* 5 Easy Pieces: "Rabid Prototyping" With "Physical Computing" and Other Dirty Tricks.

Magic Windows, Football Field Style Bicycle Race Clocks, Talking Coffee Cups, Space Invaders Style Video Games, and A War On Christmas Lights.
Hacks
Donald Davis

* A Tangled Tale

Forum-based interactive learning is an important open tech community activity. We will look at a storytelling-based example from the past.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Beaming Up With Alien and Lua

lua is an extension language that is used in everything from mail filters to World of Warcraft. Learn how you can script C libraries with lua and alien.
Chemistry
Brandon Philips

* Cloud Scaling: High Performance Even in Virtualized Environments.

Virtual hosting providers are particularly enticing for startups and new opensource projects, but they come with large and sometimes unexpected drawbacks. Learn what to expect and how to mitigate the worst performance issues you’ll face deploying your services in the cloud.
Hacks
Gavin McQuillan

* Composing Software Systems

If you can't reproduce your work reliably then you can't maintain it. You may get by for a while with ad-hoc build/release/deployment processes, but sooner or later they'll bite you. We'll present a new practical approach to assembling both software products and installed systems, drawing inspiration from sources including the functional programming community, commercial software projects, large IT deployments, and Linux distributions like Debian. Slides available at http://apters.com/osbridge2011.pdf
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Cookies are Bad for You: Improving Security on the Web

Almost every web application relies on cookies to authenticate each request after the user logs in. Cookies are vulnerable to cross-site request forgery and session hijacking. It is time to explore better, more secure alternatives that are now possible thanks to practical in-browser cryptography.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* Doing NoSQL with SQL

How to use the new NO-SQL MariaDB features from SQL.
Chemistry
Sarah Novotny

* Drizzle, Virtualizing and Scaling MySQL for the Future

Ever wondered what would happen if you could rethink a decade worth of design changes? Drizzle is a redesign of the MySQL server targeted at web development and optimized for Cloud applications.
Hacks
Brian Aker

* Gearman: From the Worker's Perspective

Many people view topics like Map/Reduce and queue systems as advanced concepts that require in-depth knowledge and time consuming software setup. Gearman is changing all that by making this barrier to entry as low as possible with an open source, distributed job queuing system.
Chemistry
Brian Aker

* Getting Started with FPGAs and HDLs

Lots of attention has been given to GPUs for speeding up certain types of computations. While GPUs are very well suited for vector operations, there are other things they are not so well suited for. FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) are not used as widely yet, but they offer a much more flexible computing fabric than GPUs. You can implement a GPU in an FPGA, for example, or you could implement your own custom processor optimized for very specialized tasks. The barrier to entry can be high for FPGAs: how does a person with a software development background get started using them? And what about HDLs (Hardware Description Langauges) used to program FPGAs? What's the difference between simulation and synthesis? What kinds of tools are freely available? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this session.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* GraphViz: The Open-Source Body Scanner for Code, Systems, and Data

Do you generate, manage, or analyze a lot of data? Do you develop software? Do you like pretty pictures? If your answer was "yes" to zero or more of these questions, this talk is for you.
Chemistry
Matt Youell

* Growing Food with Open Source

Open source folks are naturally lazy. Anything mundane task they can automate, they will. So what does an open source developer do when faced with planning, planting, and tediously watering a garden? Automate!
Hacks
Sarah Sharp

* Have Your Cake and Eat It Too: Meta-Programming Techniques for Java

You’ll learn about the techniques needed to transform classes at runtime, adding new behaviors and addressing cross-cutting concerns. The presentation will discuss a new framework for this specific purpose, but also draw examples from the Apache Tapestry web framework, which itself is rich in meta-programming constructs.
Cooking
Howard Lewis Ship

* How 5 People with 4 Day Jobs in 3 Time Zones Enjoyed 2 Years Writing 1 Book

Hear how a distributed team tackled a big project (a book about a large open source project) in our spare time. Along the way, we encountered tools, techniques, and working styles that may be useful to you in your own career—or at least serve as a humorous warning.
Business
Ian Dees

* How to Ask for Money

Have a project that just needs some cash to get off the ground? Need someone to fund beer and food for an event? Have a great idea and want to get paid for implementing it? Come find out how we did it.
Business
Selena Deckelmann, J Chris Anderson, Teyo Tyree

* Improving Estimates for Web Projects

How many times have you received an email or phone call from a potential client who describes their project in a few sentences and expects a formal proposal the next day? This session will address this seemingly impossible task by going over the method we have created at OpenSourcery to estimate web projects. This method has helped us work with clients to prioritize functionality, set realistic schedules, and has improved our ability to close sales.
Business
Alex Kroman

* JavaScript Up and Down the Stack

From the Browser to node.js all the way to the database you can use and share your JavaScript!
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* Learn Tech Management In 45 Minutes

It took me two years to get a master's in tech management. I save you $40K and give you the short version.
Business
Sumana Harihareswara

* Marketing: You're Soaking In It!

Come join me as I dispel some of the clouds of pollution which obscure the name of marketing, show how it can help your projects, reveal how--whether you realize it or not--you already use marketing every day and how that's a very good thing indeed.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Massively Scaling Django for a Global Audience with Playdoh

Django is a great web application framework that allows for rapid web app development out of the box. Since Mozilla picked up Django in 2009, they've started over a dozen Django-based projects. For these sites to scale to an international audience of millions of users, bells and whistles were needed that a stock Django instance does not offer. Playdoh combines the experience of these projects into a template that contains various fixes and add-ons to make professional Django apps fast, featuring aggressive caching, instant localization support, and bullet-proof security.
Cooking
Frederic Wenzel

* Morning Keynote - Hacking for Freedom

The last year has shown the Internet and computers to be a major force for freedom and self-determination around the world. The presenter discusses his work as a hacktivist. Working with Anonymous and Telecomix, he has helped organized protests in support of WikiLeaks, provided communications support to Egypt and the Middle East, and generally fought the good fight.
Culture
Peter Fein

* No More Joins

Everything you learned about database modeling is wrong. At least for document databases like CouchDB and MongoDB. Learn about these differences, the trade-offs, the use cases, and put it all in practice in a discussion about a real-life document database problem. Unlearn SQL habits and relax.
Cooking
Nuno Job, J Chris Anderson, Roger Bodamer

* Open Source Communities Panel

Learn from open source community leaders who work on projects big and small.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Asheesh Laroia, Noirin Plunkett, Jane Wells, Chris Strahl

* Put THAT in Your Pipe and Deploy It!

A deployment pipeline combines several development best practices, fully automated and taken to their logical extreme. The result is almost magical: changesets go in one end, and fully-tested software packages come out the other. We'll take a tour of the components of a deployment pipeline, with concrete examples showing how to use Hudson, Rake, and Puppet to deploy PHP projects.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Qs on Queues

Not sure what queuing system to use for your next project? How about the differences between broker vs direct queue services? What is a good fit for cloud vs your own data center? This session gathers information from open source queuing projects to help answer these questions and more. Queues are part of almost every scalable website and application, it's time to find the best fit for yours.
Chemistry
Eric Day

* Run Your Javascript Everywhere, with Jellyfish.

In a world where Javascript is everywhere; your browser, server, database, mobile device -- you want and need code reuse to speed up development. In order to do this, you need to know that code works in all the environments you care about. Jellyfish is a node project focused on provisioning different environments and making it easy for you to execute your JS and get the results.
Cooking
Adam Christian

* Sales-fu

Tricky to master. Sometimes the last thing you care about. (Let me code already, dammit.) However, a small amount of work on your sales-fu will pay off. So let's do this thing.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* Snooze, the Totally RESTful Language

As you can see we get a "403 Forbidden" in response to our "POST /integer/5/increment"...can anyone tell me why? It worked when we did "PUT /variable/x/let/integer/5" followed by "POST /variable/x/increment", so why can't we do it directly?
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* Testing Antipatterns

Tests are great - except when they aren't. Learn how to avoid writing tests that are more trouble than they're worth.
Cooking
Matt Robinson

* The History of Concurrency

With node.js brining callbacks back into fashion and new languages like Go baking concurrency primitives directly into the language syntax, it can be difficult to keep straight what different concurrency approaches offer, what their shortcomings are, and what inspired them.
Chemistry
Michael Schurter

* Turning Mediocre Products Into Awesome Products

A holistic approach to design for people through sketching, product blueprints, and team overlap (used by Apple and others).
Business
Jeremy Britton

* Write better Javascript with RequireJS

Web frameworks have done a good job of organizing the server side code in our web applications. But that doesn't help with Javascript. RequireJS helps you solve this problem.
Cooking
Chris Pitzer

Open Source Bridge 2010 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Civic Engagement Meetup

Come talk to other Portland software developers about how to engage with each other, the city of Portland, the Portland Development Commission.
BoF
Christie Koehler, Audrey Eschright

* Open Data BoF

A gathering for all those interested in open data, including government data, open data APIs, geodata, open social data, and more.
BoF
Kirrily Robert

* Ruby meetup

Join your fellow Rubyists to talk about fun things you're working on.
BoF
Audrey Eschright, Igal Koshevoy, Reid Beels

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Open Source Rockets

PSAS is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We're building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today.
Hacks
Nathan Bergey, Andrew Greenberg

* (CANCELLED) Getting Started with FPGAs and HDLs

Lots of attention has been given to GPUs for speeding up certain types of computations. While GPUs are very well suited for vector operations, there are other things they are not so well suited for. FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) are not used as widely yet, but they offer a much more flexible computing fabric than GPUs. You can implement a GPU in an FPGA, for example, or you could implement your own custom processor optimized for very specialized tasks. The barrier to entry can be high for FPGAs: how does a person with a software development background get started using them? And what about HDLs (Hardware Description Langauges) used to program FPGAs? What's the difference between simulation and synthesis? What kinds of tools are freely available? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this session.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* A Cloud To Call Your Own - Building Services On Open Nebula

Cloud computing, it's not all just hype! This presentation will highlight the benefits of an application centric view of infrastructure and operations and include a live demo building cloud infrastructure and providing services using Open Source tools. Starting with bare Linux images, Open Nebula will be automatically installed and configured on a cluster, while walking through the tools, architecture and resources you need to do the same thing.
Cooking
Andrew Clay Shafer, Keith Hudgins

* A day in the life of Facebook Operations

A look at the tools and practices used at Facebook to support the #2 site in the world.
Cooking
Tom Cook

* Agile User Experience Design

Agile processes can be very successful for both clients and developers, but the rapid pace and the lack of detailed long-term plans can make it difficult to design and build high quality user experiences. We'll talk about good ways to do that.
Cooking
Randall Hansen

* Best Practices for Wiki Adoption

Wikis are easy as pie to install, edit, and even to develop. The real challenge they present is in bringing together the right people in the right way to make things happen. There are ways to tackle that challenge that can give your open source community a fighting chance.
Cooking
Steven Walling, Ted Ernst

* Building A Mesh Network Wireless Temperature Sensor

The problem: My HVAC system is not balanced. Easy but boring solution: Hire a qualified contractor to fix it. More interesting solution: Use knowledge from dusty undergrad degree in electronics to cobble together some simple wireless temperature sensors using XBee modules and distribute them around the house. Then use Java programming knowledge to build up a monitoring system using open source software. Attempt to use readings from temperature sensors to figure out what's going on and fix it. This presentation will delve into the hardware and software aspects of the system, although with more emphasis on the software and the role that packages such as Apache Felix and Apache Mina play in the system.
Hacks
Michael Pigg

* Cassandra: Strategies for Distributed Data Storage

Cassandra is an open source, highly scalable distributed database that brings together Dynamo's fully distributed design and Bigtable's ColumnFamily-based data model. In this talk we'll discuss the strategies Cassandra employs to provide an eventually consistent data model.
Chemistry
Kelvin Kakugawa

* Connecting to Web Services on Android

This presentation will show how to connect to REST-based web services from an Android application. We'll discuss HTTP programming as well as XML and JSON libraries. This presentation will include a live demo of an Android application.
Cooking
Sean Sullivan

* Considering in-house automated web testing?

Interested in setting up your own test automation infrastructure? This is what you need to know.
Chemistry
Adam Christian

* Copyright lawyers can Gödel

"This compression algorithm is of course very inefficient, at least when applied to a small collection of documents. But if you were to apply it to a larger collection, say, all the music ever recorded and all movies ever made, some gains may be realized...
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* CouchApp Evently Guided Hack with CouchDB

Learn to hack Evently jQuery CouchApps -- p2p web applications that can be deployed anywhere there's a CouchDB.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Creating a low-cost clustered virtualization environment using Ganeti

Creating a redundant yet scalable virtualization environment is often difficult and expensive. Ganeti is an open source project which offers many solutions to simplify a clustered virtual machine environment while enabling you to use low cost hardware. This session will walk through Ganeti covering its basic design goals/features, installation architecture, and production implementation.
Chemistry
Lance Albertson

* Developing Replication Plugins for Drizzle

The Drizzle Project is a fork of the MySQL 6.0 server. One of the many goals of Drizzle is to enable a large plugin ecosystem by improving, simplifying, and modernizing the application programming interfaces between the kernel and the modules providing services for Drizzle. This tutorial serves to showcase the new APIs for Drizzle's replication through a series of in-depth examples.
Chemistry
Padraig O'Sullivan

* Drizzle, Scaling MySQL for the Future

Current state of Drizzle.
Hacks
Brian Aker

* eBooks, ePub, iPad, Kindle, o-my

Print is dead. Well, not dead yet. But it'll be stone dead in a moment.
Chemistry
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Efficient Multi-core Application Architectures

This session examines common application architectures in regards to threading and I/O handling. Various threading models are described and weighed, explaining the pros and cons of each. For I/O, topics such as the the c10k problem and buffering are discussed with solutions. A C++ framework is introduced as an example, but the concepts are applicable to other languages as well.
Chemistry
Eric Day

* Foundations, Non-profits, and Open Source

Should you start a foundation? Should you start a nonprofit? What's the role of non-profits in the Open Source community today? How can you be a good citizen in the Open Source arena with a foundation to support?
Business
Carol Smith

* Free Content for Good: Producing 30 Hour Day

30 Hour Day was the first web-based live streaming telethon of its kind, designed to raise money for local charities in Portland and beyond. In this presentation, I'll share my "eureka moment" when I realized that 30 Hour Day could be the lightening rod for smaller charities in local communities around the world to use our content to raise money and awareness. We'll also have a preview of the next 30 Hour Day (July 2nd & 3rd at Pioneer Courthouse Square) and how you can get involved!
Culture
doc normal

* Functional Requirements: Thinking Like A Pirate

Creating functional requirements as a part of the planning process is like creating a treasure map. You want to get compensated for the value your cool built-with-open-source-thing is providing to your clients. Your clients want it to work better than what they originally had in mind. If you do the work upfront, you'll know when you've hit the X marks the spot.
Business
Amye Scavarda, Bill Fitzgerald

* Give a Great Tech Talk

Why do so many technical presentations suck? Make sure that yours doesn't. Josh Berkus and Ian Dees will show you how to share your ideas with your audience by speaking effectively and (when the situation warrants it) showing your code.
Culture
Josh Berkus, Ian Dees

* Hacking Space Exploration

From creating remote-sensing CubeSats to analyzing aerogel: how the public is hacking into open source space exploration.
Culture
Ariel Waldman

* Hair and Yak Again -- A Hacker's Tale

API design, parallelism, automated testing, parallel automated testing, deployment, build tools, meta programming, GUI design and construction, hardware interfaces, network protocols, databases, change tracking, file formats, and why simple software becomes an epic journey.
Chemistry
Eric Wilhelm

* HipHop for PHP

HipHop transforms PHP source code into highly optimised C++ and then compiles it using g++. It allows developers to continue writing complex logical directly with PHP but leverages the speed benefits of using C++. Currently, HipHop powers the majority of Facebook servers, making this more than just a theoretical exercise. This session will cover how HipHop works, how to setup HipHop and the small changes that may be required to applications to allow it to work with both PHP and HipHop.
Chemistry
Haiping Zhao

* Housetruck: Building a Victorian RV

As a "software person," I found the hard technologies of building with steel and wood made for a very different creative and hacking process. At the same time, I discovered many parallels to software development, embedded hardware, and even open-source philosophies.
Hacks
John Labovitz

* How to write quality software using the magic of tests

Writing quality software is a worthwhile challenge. Learn how to harness the magic of testing to create better software. This presentation will provide you with an overview of the different kinds of tests, show code using different testing tools, and help you decide when and how to apply these to your projects
Cooking
Igal Koshevoy

* Infrastructure as Code

Learn how to manage your infrastructure as source code - from provisioning to application deployment and everything in between.
Cooking
Adam Jacob

* Introduction to MongoDB

MongoDB is an open source, high-performance, schema-free, document-oriented database that is rapidly gaining in popularity among web developers. In this talk we'll introduce MongoDB and the features that make it great choice for your web applications.
Cooking
Michael Dirolf

* JIT-Compiling Domain Specific Languages

During this talk, we will survey real-world implementations of JIT-compiled embedded DSLs and their applications.
Hacks
Jeremy Voorhis

* libcloud: a unified interface into the cloud

What is possible when you can consume servers on various hosting providers with nothing more than a python script? This talk will discuss libcloud, an Apache Incubator project dedicated to building standard interfaces into the cloud.
Cooking
Alex Polvi

* Lightning Talks

LIGHTNING TALKS!
Hacks
Peter Fein

* Making Drupal Go Fast with Varnish and Pressflow

You've launched your new web site and it's starting to get some attention. You've tuned your database and optimized your HTTP daemon, but what if it's not enough to keep up with all the hits you're getting? We'd like to introduce you to your two new best friends: Varnish and Pressflow.
Cooking
Greg Lund-Chaix, Rudy Grigar

* Making Robots Accessible to Everyone

I've been looking for an affordable, flexible, easy to learn robotics platform for years that I could use to teach kids the basics of programming/electronics/robotics. Last Fall, I finally found it.
Culture
Brett Nelson, Jim Larson

* Multicore Haskell Now!

Multicore computers are here: is your programming language ready?
Hacks
Don Stewart

* Node.js and you

Node.js is one of the most exciting things to happen to server-side development in the last few years. Here you'll find out why Node.js is a perfect fit for your next project and a better fit than existing languages for modern web development.
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* Non-visual location-based augmented reality using GPS data

Augmented Reality and Geolocation have been hot topics this year, but there has often been a confusion between aesthetics vs. practicality, and fantasy vs. reality. This presentation will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of visual and non-visual augmented reality. We'll tell stories from our experiences building location-aware social networks with custom proximity notification.
Hacks
Aaron Parecki, Amber Case

* OAuth: an Open Specification for Web Services

Curious about OAuth? Ever wondered why OAuth has steadily gained popularity among major API providers such as Google and Twitter? Ever wondered how OAuth helps streamline consuming data from other providers? Learn more about OAuth the specification and how to implement OAuth with PHP5. The session will cover the basics of OAuth, and follow up with an OAuth implementation using php.net/oauth.
Hacks
John Jawed

* Open Source and the Open Social Web

Open Source software has been instrumental in the development of every revolutionary communications technology on the Internet. The Open social Web is no different.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* Open Source Storage Solutions and Next Generation Linux File Systems

Unlike most areas of enterprise IT, open source solutions in the storage industry have remained in the background. In 2010 this situation is going to change dramatically with new open source storage solutions, next-generation Linux file systems, and emerging cloud offerings making significant inroads.
Cooking
Anand Babu (AB) Periasamy

* Organizing user groups, a panel discussion

User groups are a vital part of the open source community. Learn more about how to start a group, keep it going, and make an existing group better from a panel of experienced user group organizers.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Jesse Hallett, Eric Wilhelm, Christie Koehler, gabrielle roth, Audrey Eschright, Sam Keen

* Practical Facebook stalking with Open Source tools

Facebook are full of juicy information about your friends and strangers alike! Learn how to use some simple open source tools and techniques to learn more about them.
Hacks
Paul Fenwick

* Professional JavaScript

JavaScript is a unique and powerful language. Its ubiquity in the browser and its elegant concurrency model make JavaScript an ideal tool in a number of situations. Learn about the best ways to use and to understand this language from a full-time JavaScript professional.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* Puppet for Beginners

Puppet is a powerful configuration management tool that makes life easier for people managing systems and applications. This tutorial gives you an in-depth and hands-on introduction to Puppet that is ideal for beginners to Puppet and configuration management.
Cooking
Teyo Tyree

* Speeding up your PHP Application

Is your Wordpress site too slow? What's this HipHop PHP thing? How do I write really fast PHP apps? Drop by to get the answers to these questions.
Hacks
Rasmus Lerdorf

* Sphinx - the ultimate tool for documenting your software project

Open source software projects can succeed or fail based on their documentation. Thanks to Sphinx, open source developers now have a "documentation framework" that provides convenient indexing and automatic syntax highlighting, integrates your documentation with your code, and can automatically generate a beautiful manual as a PDF document.
Cooking
Nate Aune

* Stacks of Cache

This talk focuses on adapting and augmenting interfaces to memcache in order to overcome some of its limitations and to better utilize available resources. Then we'll talk about combining those interfaces in a simple, snap-together fashion.
Cooking
Duncan Beevers

* SuperSpeed me: USB 3.0 Open Source Support

USB 3.0 promises a 10x speedup and better power management than USB 2.0. But how do these devices actually work? Is there open source support for them? Come learn about these fast new devices that are finally hitting the market.
Chemistry
Sarah Sharp

* Teach your class to fish, and they'll have food for a lifetime.

You have so much you want to teach, how do you structure it so that your training course is both interesting and challenging? How much theory can you squeeze into an hour before your attendees have forgotten where you started? How do you structure your course to account for classes which move slower or faster than average? This talk will cover all of these answers and more.
Business
Jacinta Richardson

* The Fine Line Between Creepy and Fun

Social software is kind of a big deal right now. In the open-source spirit of transparency and dissection, let's talk about what makes social technology creepy, what makes it fun, and how to hack things to maximize your desired outcome.
Hacks
Audrey Eschright

* The Open Geo Stack

Location and mapping are making a huge impact on the web and mobile. Open Source is right there. Learn the elements of the geo stack, from mapping APIs to geo databases.
Cooking
Adam DuVander

* The Return of Command-Line Kung Fu

A follow-on to last year's highly popular presentation, Hal Pomeranz returns with another super-size helping of command-line madness!
Cooking
Hal Pomeranz

* The symfony framework behind the scenes at museum installations

The symfony framework is a full-stack web framework for PHP. It's great for building websites, but you might be surprised where else it comes in handy. David Brewer shows how Second Story uses symfony to build custom content management and delivery systems powering interactive installations ranging from collections of Disney memorabilia to maps plotting every monument at Gettysburg.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* When Everything Looks Like A Nail

Markus: Nautilus? I thought you said noodle house! Matt: Wait, wait, I think I see her head!! Markus: Are you sure? Matt: Maybe It's Not Her Head...
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

* Why the Sysadmin Hates Your Software

You've worked really hard on your software. It's stable and has lots of nice features and users love it. But your sysadmin hates it and complains about how hard it is to install, configure, and manage. What's up with that?
Chemistry
Steve VanDevender

* X Marks the Spot: Applying OpenStreetMap to the High Seas

The United States has a treasure trove of nautical charts in digital form, including plots of shipwrecks, navigation buoys, coastal and river depths, and other fine booty. OpenStreetMap is an open source, open format collaborative project for building a free map of the world. Join this session to find out more of the marine secrets of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), OpenSeaMap's plans to extend OSM to the high seas, and splicing the two (and your mainbrace) together. We'll use the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL), OGR, Python, and the OSM API.
Hacks
Liz Henry, Danny O'Brien

* You Shall Not Pass: Managing Expectations and Boundaries with Clients

Open Source is great fun, even in the area of professional services. But sometimes, you want to be able to pay the bills with your awesomeness too. One of the areas of difficulty is setting boundaries with clients, even though you really just want to write amazing stuff.
Business
Amye Scavarda, Chris Strahl

* Your Internets are Leaking

Using your computer on a public network is like having a conversation on a city bus: people you don't know can hear everything you say. They'll probably be polite and ignore you, but you still might not want to shout out your credit card number. Yet this is what your computer does. All the time. And you don't know it.
Cooking
Reid Beels, Michael Schwern

Favorite proposals for this user

* 'Open Source Business Models' and other mythical creatures

A humorous look at the taxonomy of Open Source ecosystems and the businesses that support/are supported by them based on one person's reflections and observations on a two years spent building an open source business and selling 'free'.
Business 2010-03-26 03:25:34 +0000
Andrew Clay Shafer

* 21 Rules for Software Consulting

Do you have what it takes to succeed as a software consultant? Or will you crash and burn out in an avalanche of missed deadlines, overdue bills and litiginous former clients? Learn the 21 rules and you have a much better chance of surviving, or even succeeding.
Business 2010-03-14 05:01:40 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Automating Flex/Flash with Windmill or Selenium

Get automated tests up and running for your Flex or Flash application in minutes.
Cooking 2010-03-24 18:20:20 +0000
Adam Christian

* Behaviour Driven Infrastructure

Does Behaviour Driven Development have a role in the infrastructure world? Enter Behaviour Driven Infrastructure where systems administrators can apply BDD principles to make infrastructure management more powerful, more insightful and deliver more value to their customers.
Cooking 2010-03-25 23:22:35 +0000
James Turnbull

* Building a GNU Cross-Compiler Toolchain for Microcontrollers

What pieces do you need to build code for ARM, AVR and similar microcontrollers? How do you put them together? Why might you do that, instead of just loading a package?
Hacks 2010-03-25 20:28:50 +0000
David Madden

* Building a platform from open source at Yahoo!

Join us for a case study on using open source tools to build a platform for enterprise web applications with symfony. The focus of this session will be on how Yahoo! has built web applications that scale with open source tools.
Chemistry 2010-02-24 22:12:54 +0000
Dustin Whittle

* Clojure: Towards The Essence Of Programming

You may know Java or C# ... but do you own it? Can you add new language features to suit your needs? Of course not ... but with Clojure, you can! Clojure is more than a powerful language, it's a powerful language toolkit.
Chemistry 2010-03-24 23:44:10 +0000
Howard Lewis Ship

* Constructing Effective Arguments

Ever find yourself having difficulty convincing others on the mailing list that your idea is the "right way" to do things? How about convincing your manager that it really is a great idea to run Open Source software? Need to get that patch accepted upstream? Come learn how to construct an effective argument, and increase your powers of persuasion.
Cooking 2010-03-30 06:04:11 +0000
Jennifer Redman

* Data Visualization For Fun and Profit

How to improve your software (and your business) using a bit of math, some Python code, and R, the world's best free statistics software.
Cooking 2010-02-22 20:53:57 +0000
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Dealing the scaling: Goat Rodeo

Join David Pollak, Goat Rodeo's founder, to learn more about how to model your applications using the Goat so that your app can scale from the developers desktop to production to planet-scale without change to the app logic.
Hacks 2010-03-15 21:11:25 +0000
David Pollak

* Developing easily deployable PHP Applications

Talks about how to develop PHP applications that can be deployed on many different platforms with ease.
Chemistry 2010-03-15 02:09:08 +0000
John Mertic

* Django 102 - past the introduction

You've been through the tutorials on Django, and now you want to deploy a real site in it - and you're lost. Let's fix that.
Cooking 2010-03-26 00:06:35 +0000
Chris Pitzer

* Everything you ever wanted to know about Amazon EC2

Amazon Web Services makes it possible to build scalable systems easily with very little upfront capital. Come to this session to learn about what's so cool about cloud computing, and how Amazon's suite of elastic cloud computing tools make your job easier.
Cooking 2010-03-26 03:39:34 +0000
Nate Aune

* Fiddling with Linux

A violin is an analog instrument beloved throughout the world. I started playing at the end of 2009 and will spare sharing my skills but, I will share Linux tools, scripts and hardware I use to help learn and play.
Hacks 2010-03-26 05:38:45 +0000
Brandon Philips

* From the Ashes of MetroFi

The Personal Telco Project has been offered a portion of the wireless gear abandoned by the MetroFi muni-wifi failure. We are working on extracting the maximum public benefit from what we ultimately receive.
Hacks 2010-02-24 09:04:44 +0000
Russell Senior

* Get organized: Emacs a la org-mode

Have you ever finished a day and wondered where the time went? Need to bill customers but only have a vague idea of your actual effort? Get back on track with a heaping scoop of org-mode!
Cooking 2010-03-16 14:00:16 +0000
Brandon Philips

* Grails for Switchers

Come on. You know you want to.
Cooking 2010-03-03 23:20:21 +0000
Matt Woodward

* Harnessing Java with Scala

We provide you an introduction to the Scala programming language through its powerful capabilities to integrating with Java. We will demonstrate how Scala can be an effective means of exploring Java libraries such as JAXB, HttpClient and Hibernate. We will show why Scala is our preferred harness, with capabilities beyond Java, Beanshell or Groovy.
Cooking 2010-03-22 03:19:50 +0000
Thomas Lockney, Trenton Lipscomb

* How to build a simple website in Drupal in an hour -ish

Drupal has a steep learning curve for non-developers. Learn how to get started and build a simple website in an hour (or as long as you allow).
Cooking 2010-03-26 05:50:58 +0000
VJ Beauchamp

* Interacting with a group of servers in real-time with MCollective

Today we have tools like cfengine, puppet, and chef to help automate server deployment, configuration, and maintenance. However, its been difficult to interact with those same servers in real-time. MCollective is a framework which allows you to interact with small to very large clusters of servers in real-time. This session will cover its features, common uses, and extending its functionality.
Cooking 2010-03-24 23:26:36 +0000
Lance Albertson

* Introduction to SnapLogic

SnapLogic is an open source platform for building system integrations that can be scripted or extended in Python and Java. With SnapLogic, complex integrations are broken down into discrete components that act upon data streams. Using this framework, it is possible to build conduits among homogenous SaaS systems, databases, etc. In this session, we'll introduce the system and walk through the code to create a new integration target: a SaaS system with an XML API.
Cooking 2010-03-17 00:02:19 +0000
Dylan Reinhardt

* Javascript, the One True Language

JavaScript has long been considered a toy language, but new project focusing on server-side JavaScript the language could be the best choice for new development.
Cooking 2010-02-24 19:02:14 +0000
Stephen Woods

* Lessons Learned from Open Source Development

Two decades worth of lessons learned around open source development.
Culture 2010-03-25 06:56:50 +0000
Brian Aker

* Meta-Programmng Java with Tapestry 5

Why code when you can meta-code? Learn how you can leverage Tapestry's built-in aspect oriented technologies to eliminate cut-and-paste coding (and ugly inheritance hierarchies) with simple declarative annotations.
Cooking 2010-03-24 23:49:51 +0000
Howard Lewis Ship

* Nothing But Nines: Achieving %99.999 Uptime with Open Source High Availability Clustering

Achieve the ultimate in business continuity and productivity by eliminating downtime. As of Linux 2.6.33, Distributed Replicated Block Device (DRBD) is mainline. Find out what it is, what it does, why its awesome and how it can be coupled with Pacemaker to ensure your services remain highly available.
Cooking 2010-03-25 00:54:06 +0000
Adam Gandelman

* Open Source business from the trenches

Using lessons learned from founding Opscode as a background, we'll talk about the different considerations and stages in building an open source business - from licensing and lawyers to funding and fostering a health community.
Business 2010-03-26 03:05:22 +0000
Adam Jacob

* Open Source Ethernet I/O Convergence in the Data Center with Open FCoE, iSCSI and Data Center Bridging as building blocks of The Cloud

That LAN port on your server just got sexy with high speed 10 Gigabit Ethernet and storage protocols providing the building blocks for data center LAN/SAN protocol convergence. We'll explore the protocol stacks, code resources and the application of these technologies in virtualized data centers. We'll also talk about the "big iron" IT vendor’s application of I/O convergence and how you as an open source developer can contribute.
Chemistry 2010-03-26 06:01:19 +0000
doc normal

* perl5i: Perl 5 Improved

perl5i is a single module bringing together the best magic Perl programmers have to offer catapulting the basic language forward. Suddenly everything is an object! Functions return objects and throw exceptions! You don't have to load six modules to work with files! Perl 5 is fun again!
Hacks 2010-03-26 00:52:24 +0000
Michael Schwern

* PHP for professional folks

Join this session if you are interested in learning about the latest and greatest tools and techniques available to the PHP community.
Cooking 2010-02-24 22:21:13 +0000
Dustin Whittle

* PostgreSQL Techniques for Django Developers

With support right out of the box, Django is one of the most efficient ways of deploying a PostgreSQL-backed web application. We'll discuss techniques to get maximum efficiency out of PostgreSQL using Django, including schema design tips, Django ORM techniques, transaction management, and extending PostgreSQL.
Cooking 2010-03-30 06:46:45 +0000
Christophe Pettus

* Server optimization for high traffic web systems using multiple retry and learning timeout patterns

A webpage typically will be as slow as the slowest request in the page. So if for a high traffic website like Yahoo! frontpage has lots of such possibly slow external apis, it could hold webserver processes and also effect user experience. Multiple Retry is a feature meant to optimize server resource utilization and efficiently use webserver processes/threads.
Chemistry 2010-03-26 18:24:10 +0000
Jayadev Chandrasekhar

* Slideware

When you're giving a technical talk, you're the star---but the code you're presenting is your most important prop. We're going to discuss ways to show your code to an audience. You'll come away with tips that will save you time and help you communicate your ideas clearly.
Cooking 2010-03-10 20:44:58 +0000
Ian Dees

* Software is Culture

Software development requires not only technology, but also an understanding of engineering economics and human interactions. Engineering economics is the obtaining, allocating and deploying of resources, including individuals with specific skills and temperament, to efficiently develop software that meets the needs and expectations of its users. Programming is considered a technical activity but it is first and foremost a human activity whose success is determined by emotional intelligence, innate talents, personality and communications.
Culture 2010-03-24 23:44:50 +0000
John Prohodsky

* Stoking the fires: How to sell your work without selling your soul

This presentation will compare and contrast the "open core" and "open complement" models with a third model called “open infrastructure” (evident in Linux, JBoss, Apache, and Subversion), in which infrastructure is open sourced as a platform for other companies’ commercial products.
Business 2010-03-24 00:18:26 +0000
Jack Repenning

* SugarCRM - Your next open source business application framework

This talk will explore using SugarCRM outside of it's normal usage as a CRM application, instead using it as an open source business application platform.
Cooking 2010-03-15 02:08:02 +0000
John Mertic

* Test Driven Database Development

Learn how to apply the principals of test-driven development to developing a database schema.
Cooking 2010-03-21 01:02:05 +0000
David Wheeler

* The Future of Mobile: Learn to Build W3C Widgets and Device APIs with PhoneGap

We know the future of the web is mobile, but what's the future of mobile? In this session, you'll learn how to step-up mobile app development with widgets and device APIs. Add these two technologies to your toolbox to begin building next-gen mobile apps today.
Hacks 2010-02-24 22:47:21 +0000
Brian LeRoux

* Theme any website in two hours with Deliverance

Imagine if you could take any website design and use it as-is with any website or web application? Well, you can with Deliverance!
Cooking 2010-03-26 03:44:12 +0000
Nate Aune

* Understanding and building scalable software paradigms

The road lay ahead, success or failure, and how you respond early will help determine your outcome. With much planning, thought, and expense you've built the greatest tribute to innovation, Solving a problem, filling a need or answering the call of excellence. All worthy pursuits in the attempt to obtain your goals and roll out your product or solution. Success!! People are using it. One problem, people are using it.
Cooking 2010-03-18 06:25:10 +0000
Dan Wade

* Using virtualization and automation to improve your web development workflow

Large-scale web projects use sophisticated staged deployment systems, but the prospect of setting these up can be daunting. Using virtualization and automated configuration puts the benefits within easy reach even for small projects. David Brewer explains how Second Story uses Linux, VMware Server, and AutomateIt to grease the wheels of development on their museum-sector projects.
Cooking 2010-03-29 15:42:24 +0000
David Brewer

* Write a Linux Device Driver: Flipping bits, blinking lights and crashing Kernels

Curious what makes your hardware tick? Itching to crash your system in a indiviualized way? Then you should try your hand at writing a device driver for Linux.
Chemistry 2010-03-26 05:31:26 +0000
Brandon Philips

Open Source Bridge 2009 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Creating conference sites with OpenConferenceWare

OpenConferenceWare is the application running this site. The software is themeable, customizable and open sourced: anyone can use it to run their own conference site. OpenConferenceWare's developers would like to talk with users about making the software better, organizers about using it for other events, and with those interested in joining the development team.
BoF
Igal Koshevoy, Reid Beels

* PDXCritique

PDXCritique is an open forum where anyone who makes things can get constructive criticism on their work from their peers.
BoF
ben hengst

* PostgreSQL BOF

PDXPUG will host the PostgreSQL BOF.
BoF
gabrielle roth

* Puppet Q&A

Ask the main Puppet developers about the state of the software, its roadmap, or anything else you're interested in.
BoF
Luke Kanies, James Turnbull

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* An Introduction to Computer Vision

Learn about several computer vision techniques and how to put them together to form an entry-level object classifier.
Chemistry
Matthew Dockrey

* Assholes are killing your project

The strength of your community is the best predictor of your project's long-term viability. What happens when your community is gradually infiltrated by assholes, who infect everyone else with their constant negativity and personal attacks? This talk will teach you about the dramatic impact assholes are having on your organization today and will show you how you can begin to repair it.
Culture
Donnie Berkholz

* Bridging the Developer and the Datacenter

This discussion will creatively explore the fundamental technologies being used by hosting providers, and bridge these concepts with open source development and application deployment. Developers attending this discussion will be provided with examples of where failure can occur, and what questions to ask their provider to ensure optimal uptime for their applications.
Business
Thomas Brenneke

* Building Open-Source Desktop Apps with the Titanium Platform

The open-source Titanium platform allows developers to use their existing knowledge of rich web application technologies – JavaScript, Python, Ruby, HTML and CSS – to build desktop applications. In this presentation we'll go from start to finish building a desktop application using Titanium.
Cooking
Marshall Culpepper, Martin Robinson

* Building Scale Free Applications with Hadoop and Cascading

A rapid introduction to Hadoop architecture, MapReduce patterns, and best practices with Cascading.
Cooking
Chris Wensel

* Configuration Management Panel

Configuration management tools are finally coming into their own. Powerful, automated infrastructure management is now available in a wide variety of open source tools. Tools written in different languages, using varying operational methodologies and embracing differing philosophies. Come meet some of the creators and maintainers of these cutting edge tools like cfengine, Puppet, AutomateIT, Chef, and bcfg2 and quiz them in the why and hows of their tools and the philosophies behind them.
Cooking
James Turnbull, Igal Koshevoy, Luke Kanies, Narayan Desai, Adam Jacob, Brendan Strejcek

* Drizzle, Rethinking MySQL for the Web

Rethinking MySQL for the modern web.
Chemistry
Brian Aker

* Effective code sprinting

Code sprints are events where developers quickly complete coding tasks in a collaborative environment. A panel of skilled developers will share their experiences for organizing effective code sprints so you can better participate and organize your own. The panel members have organized and participated in over a hundred sprints (ranging from Django to JRuby) and used sprints as the primary way to develop community-oriented projects (e.g., Calagator). While most of the discussion will be about volunteer-run open source code sprints, many of the ideas will be readily applicable to improving development at your workplace. The panel will offer practical, actionable advice that you can use and answer your questions.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Reid Beels, Audrey Eschright

* Firefox Switchblade

Building novel and robust applications with Firefox
Cooking
Dietrich Ayala

* Friday Unconference Kickoff & Scheduling

Welcome to the unconference day.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Chris Messina

* How Idealist.org uses technology to change the world

Idealist.org's mission is to help change the world by providing proactive people, communities, and organizations with a forum to connect and communicate.
Culture
Michel Pelletier

* JRuby: when Ruby grows up and gets a job

Ruby has established itself as a first-tier language for developing web applications. Now it's time to think about everything else.
Cooking
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Open Source Development - The Dark Side

Navigating the Darkside of the Open Source Development Community. A decidedly sarcastic and hopefully humorous look at the dark under-belly of the Open Source Development Culture.
Culture
Jennifer Redman

* Open Source Microblogging with Laconica

Microblogging lets people share short status messages with their social network. Public Web sites like Twitter, Jaiku and Plurk are wildly popular with consumers, but Open Source programs allow a distributed social graph and implementation inside the enterprise firewall. Evan Prodromou, founder of Identi.ca, will describe the Open Source microblogging tool Laconica and its uses in the workplace and on the Public Web.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* Open Source Tools for Freelancers

As a freelancer, you must be your own IT department. You are responsible for website hosting, backups, version control, project/time-tracking and invoicing. Finding inexpensive and maintainable solutions for these needs can be quite daunting. In this session, I will present an overview open-source solutions for these needs.
Business
Christie Koehler

* Practical Paper Prototyping

Paper prototyping is the fastest, cheapest way to test your user interface designs. To prove it, in 45 minutes we'll walk through several rounds of prototyping and testing a small application.
Cooking
Randall Hansen

* Programming patterns in sed

Learn to turn line noise into clean and structured, albeit unreadable, sed programs.
Hacks
Philip Tellis

* Remember Tcl/ Tk? Grandpa might be old, but he can still kick your ass!

Rumors of its senescence -- at least lack of stylishness -- to the contrary, Tcl/Tk is still one of the best scripting environments around. I will show you why.
Hacks
Webb Sprague

* Scala for recovering Java developers

Scala is a functional/object-oriented hybrid language that runs on the JVM or the CLR. Scala is fully compatible with Java and brings many powerful features to the JVM, features such as: the ability to easily create DSL's due to Scala's ability to define methods for most operators, easily target multi-core hardware as Scala's types are immutable by default, access to the Actor based concurrency model, and expressive and concise code due to Scala's type inference and expressive syntax. All this without much of the boilerplate and cruft code that is so common in Java.
Cooking
Shawn Spooner

* Server Sky

Solar powered server and communication arrays in Earth orbit . Manufacturing, costs, environmental benefits, security, maintenance, and survivability will be discussed.
Hacks
Keith Lofstrom

* Spindle, Mutilate and Metaprogram: How far _can_ you push it before there be dragons?

Maybe the edge isn’t as close as we thought it was. Maybe you can do some really funky things with your language without accidentally summoning eldritch spirits. Or maybe not. The only way to find out is to try it—or, if you are of the more prudent proclivities, to watch someone else try it.
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

* The Linux Kernel Development model

How the Linux kernel development model works.
Chemistry
Greg Kroah-Hartman

* Using virtualization and automation to improve your web development workflow

Large-scale web projects use sophisticated staged deployment systems, but the prospect of setting these up can be daunting. Using virtualization and automated configuration puts the benefits within easy reach even for small projects. David Brewer explains how Second Story uses Linux, VMware Server, and AutomateIt to grease the wheels of development on their museum-sector projects.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Virtualize vs Containerize: Fight!

Everyone has a different reason to love virtualization: security, configuration isolation... the list goes on. But containerization offers many of the same goodies as virtualization, alongside an efficiency and performance advantage. Just what you need, more options. There's no wrong answer. Andy de la Lucha and Irving Popovetsky help you ask the right questions about what's right for your environment.
Chemistry
Andy de la Lucha, Irving Popovetsky

Favorite proposals for this user

* AutomateIt: Creating agile infrastructure through server automation

AutomateIt is an open source tool for automating the setup and maintenance of UNIX-like servers, applications and their dependencies. Compared to cfengine and Puppet, AutomateIt is easier to work with, more powerful, and uses syntax that will be immediately familiar to anyone that's written a shell script. AutomateIt's author, Igal Koshevoy, is a veteran software engineer and systems administrator that's managed hundreds of servers at a time and has over a decade of automation experience working with companies like Intel, Oracle, and many startups. He'll discuss how to effectively use server automation, and demonstrate how to use AutomateIt's features, along with code samples, that address real world automation needs.
Cooking 2009-04-11 06:53:03 +0000
Igal Koshevoy