Clojure: Functional Concurrency for the JVM

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Accepted Session
Short form
Scheduled: Wednesday, June 17, 2009 from 2:45 – 3:30pm in Hawthorne

Excerpt

Talk about strange bedfellows: what happens when you mix one part Lisp (one of the oldest computer languages), one part Java (so young, yet so well adopted), a healthy serving of functional programming, and a state-of-the-art concurrency layer on top? That's Clojure, which "feels like a general-purpose language beamed back from the near future."

Description

Talk about strange bedfellows: what happens when you mix one part Lisp (one of the oldest computer languages), one part Java (so young, yet so well adopted), a healthy serving of functional programming, and a state-of-the-art concurrency layer on top? That’s Clojure, which “feels like a general-purpose language beamed back from the near future.” Clojure embraces functional programming with immutable data types and first class functions. It is fully interoperable with Java. Clojure’s approach to concurrency includes asynchonous Agents, and Software Transactional Memory. Clojure is fast, elegant, dynamic, and scalable: a language for the future, today.

Speaking experience

Speaker

  • Howard basement hands folded square

    Biography

    Howard Lewis Ship cut his teeth writing customer support software in
    PL/1. He made the jump to Object Oriented programming via NeXTSTEP
    and Objective-C before transitioning to Java. He created the initial version of
    Tapestry in early 2000, and is currently working on Apache Tapestry 5.2.

    Howard is respected in the Java community as an expert on web application development, dependency injection, Java meta-programming, and developer productivity. He is a frequent speaker at JavaOne, NoFluffJustStuff, ApacheCon and other conferences, and the author of “Tapestry in Action” for Manning (covering Tapestry 3.0).

    Howard was elected a Java Champion in February 2010.

    Howard is an independent consultant, specializing in Tapestry and Clojure training, mentoring and project work. He lives in Portland, Oregon with his wife Suzanne, a novelist, and his son Jacob.

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