Your Internets are Leaking

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Accepted Session
Short Form
Scheduled: Thursday, June 3, 2010 from 4:45 – 5:30pm in Morrison

Excerpt

Using your computer on a public network is like having a conversation on a city bus: people you don't know can hear everything you say. They'll probably be polite and ignore you, but you still might not want to shout out your credit card number. Yet this is what your computer does. All the time. And you don't know it.

Description

Using FTP, telnet (some of you must still be using telnet), sending mail, surfing gopher, and visiting web sites can all give away personal information and passwords.

We’ll show how easy it is for your traffic to be intercepted (using open source tools) and what you can do to protect yourself (also using open source tools).

Including such excitement as:

  • Packet sniffers and you
  • The dark and ancient magic of SSL certificates
  • Man/woman in the middle attacks
  • Working around and tunneling through insecure networks
  • Quitting passwords cold turkey with public keys and other tools
  • Charts! Graphs!
  • Public shaming!
  • (and possibly more)

Speaking experience

Speakers

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    Reid Beels

    Open Source Bridge

    Biography

    Reid Beels lives in the lovely town of Portland, Oregon where he is thrilled to be a part of a rapidly exploding technology community. He likes to design things, plan events, take pictures, bake, and ride his bike.

    In the Spring of 2008, Reid finished studying Communication Design at the Pacific Northwest College of Art and now works as a freelance design, web development and interactivity consultant.

    Current side projects include helping to organize Open Source Bridge, a new kind of developers conference, and hacking on Calagator, a wiki-like calendar aggregation platform.

    Sessions

  • Schwern round tuit oscon 2005

    Biography

    Schwern has a copy of Perl 6, he lets Larry Wall borrow it and take notes.

    Schwern once sneezed into a microphone and the text-to-speech conversion was a regex that turns crap into gold.

    Damian Conway and Schwern once had an arm wrestling contest. The superposition still hasn’t collapsed.

    Schwern was the keynote speaker at the first YAPC::Mars.

    When Schwern runs a smoke test, the fire department is notified.

    Dan Brown analyzed a JAPH Schwern wrote and discovered it contained the Bible.

    Schwern writes Perl code that writes Makefiles that write shell scripts on VMS.

    Schwern does not commit to master, master commits to Schwern.

    SETI broadcast some of Schwern’s Perl code into space. 8 years later they got a reply thanking them for the improved hyper drive plans.

    Schwern once accidentally typed “git pull —hard” and dragged Github’s server room 10 miles.

    There are no free namespaces on CPAN, there are just modules Schwern has not written yet.

    Schwern’s tears are said to cure cancer, unfortunately his Perl code gives it right back.

    Sessions

      • Title: How To Report A Bug
      • Track: Cooking
      • Room: Broadway
      • Time: 3:454:30pm
      • Excerpt:

        Bug reports drive Open Source, but too often it’s a hostile experience. As a user, how do you report a bug without being treated like you’re dumping a sack of crap on the developer’s doorstep? As a developer, how do you encourage users to report bugs? This is not a tutorial, but an examination of the social aspects of bug reporting.

      • Speakers: Michael Schwern
      • Title: Your Internets are Leaking
      • Track: Cooking
      • Room: Morrison
      • Time: 4:455:30pm
      • Excerpt:

        Using your computer on a public network is like having a conversation on a city bus: people you don’t know can hear everything you say. They’ll probably be polite and ignore you, but you still might not want to shout out your credit card number. Yet this is what your computer does. All the time. And you don’t know it.

      • Speakers: Reid Beels, Michael Schwern