How Can I Contribute?

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Accepted Session
Short Form
Beginner
Scheduled: Wednesday, June 21, 2017 from 2:30 – 3:15pm

Excerpt

This talk is for you, the documentarian, developer, student, or community member wondering what you can contribute to open source and how to get started. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you're contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request.

Description

Contributing to open source is a great way to give back to a project you care about, grow a community around software, and help make a project more useful. But often those who want to contribute have a few assumptions or misconceptions that prevent them from making that first pull request, including:

  • I’m not a good enough programmer to contribute to open source
  • I don’t know the repo well enough to contribute
  • I don’t write code, so I have nothing to contribute
  • I’m just a student / community member / manager / llama, I don’t have anything to contribute
  • Contributing to open source is hard
  • Contributing to open source doesn’t benefit me at all

If those sound familiar, this talk is for you. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you’re contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request. The truth is that everyone who uses a technology can help that technology, whether by submitting a bug report, correcting a spelling error in documentation, submitting a patch to fix a bug, adding unit tests, updating dependencies. . .the list goes on.

Topics include:

  • Common things a repository may need help with (legal, documentation, bug reporting, updates, etc.)
  • Skills you have, and how to use them to help a project
  • Determining what a repository needs
  • What to look for in a repository when you’re thinking of contributing
  • How to submit your first contribution

Tags

git, Open Source, contributing, diversity, inclusion

Speaking experience

I have a range of speaking experience, from conferences to coding bootcamps to online technical courses. Here are some highlights:
* 'How Can I Contribute?' OSCON 2017
* 'Linux Jargon' SeaGL 2016
* 'Modifying the Kernel: A How-to' SCaLE 2016
* 'Introduction to Sass' Udemy, https://www.udemy.com/intro-to-sass/learn/v4/
* 'Sass: What it is, how it's used, and why it's so syntactically awesome' OSCON 2015
* 'Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Pelican: A Comparison of SSGs' OSBridge 2015, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKidi3KAvZ0
* 'Single System Fundamentals' Linux Fest NW 2015, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqTyua5wk3k

Speaker

  • Me

    Lucy Wyman

    Puppet

    Biography

    I’m a Quality Assurance Engineer for Puppet Labs, where I automate tests and develop testing infrastructure for puppet orchestrator, PCP, and PE core. I graduated from Oregon State University with a BS in Computer Science in June 2016, where I worked as a Front-End Engineer for the OSU Open Source Lab. In my free time I enjoy hanging out with friends, hiking, experiencing new things, and enjoying a wide variety of podcasts, tv shows, blogs, books, and other media.

    You can see more of my work at http://lucywyman.me and http://github.com/lucywyman
    See conference presentations I’ve given at http://slides.lucywyman.me
    Or read my thoughts at http://blog.lucywyman.me

    Sessions

      • Title: How Can I Contribute?
      • Track: Culture
      • Time: 2:303:15pm
      • Excerpt:

        This talk is for you, the documentarian, developer, student, or community member wondering what you can contribute to open source and how to get started. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you’re contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request.

      • Speakers: Lucy Wyman
      • Title: The Existential Tester: How to Assess Risk and Prioritize Tests
      • Track: Theory
      • Time: 2:303:15pm
      • Excerpt:

        To test, or not to test? That is the question. With limited time and resources there are only so many tests we can write and run. How do you determine what features of a new project to test? How do you know when a test is obsolete, or needs to be updated? What gets run per-commit, nightly, or weekly? What should you test manually? This talk will give you a framework for thinking about how to assess risk on a project and prioritize your

      • Speakers: Lucy Wyman