Magic, Spontaneity or Planning: Different Approaches to Building an Open Source Foundation

*
Accepted Session
Short Form
Beginner
Scheduled: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 from 11:00 – 11:45am in B201

Excerpt

Open Source Foundations start in a variety of ways. Often they begin organically to fill a need after a person or small group aims to "scratch an itch" and then needs an organization behind it. Some of these organizations can appear to happen out of nowhere. Other organizations are birthed from careful planning and intentional formation. There are still others that are a combination of the two. Different methods can create powerful impact, but some of the challenges are different. This talk with compare and contrast the ways foundations are formed and the advantages of different approaches.

Description

Open Source Foundations start in a variety of ways. Often they begin organically to fill a need after a person or small group aims to “scratch an itch” and then needs an organization behind it. Some of these organizations can appear to happen out of nowhere. Other organizations are birthed from careful planning and intentional formation. There are still others that are a combination of the two. Different methods can create powerful impact, but some of the challenges are different. This talk with compare and contrast the ways foundations are formed and the advantages of different approaches. This talk is inspired by my experiences co-founding the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT), OpenStreetMap US and joining the Cadasta Foundation last year. HOT began spontaneously to fill a need for detailed map data in humanitarian response, OpenStreetMap US simply needed a way to host a conference, and Cadasta came along after careful planning, but no less an important need, low cost ways for communities to document their land rights.

Within this talk I will touch on the following points:

  • How do you build community around the different types of organizations?
  • What are the challenges with funding the different types of Foundations?
  • How is organizational culture developed differently in each circumstance?
  • Is impact different with the varied approaches?
  • What should one consider before trying each approach?

Tags

foundations, funding

Speaking experience

I have spoken around the world at a variety of conferences from formal World Bank Conferences to Community Driven Events (such as Open Source Bridge). Below is a selected list of talks I've given:

The Missing Maps Project International CrisisMappers Conference, November 2014 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMPNfFu7VuA)
OpenStreetMap for Resilience, Response and Recovery – FOSSAsia, February 2014
OSM for Disasters: Preparing and Responding with Communities (keynote)– LinuxConf Australia, January 2014 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnSXxY4NDA8)
From Geo for Some to Geo for All (keynote) – FOSS4G, September 2013
OpenStreetMap's Role in the 2013 Jakarta Floods – OSCON, July 2013
Helping Others with OSM, Joining the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team – State of the Map US, October 2012
Local Outreach, Local Communities, World Map – State of the Map US, October 2012
State of the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team – State of the Map, September 2012
Applications of Crowdsourcing for Development and Disaster Response (panel) – Understanding Risk, July 2012
Using OpenStreetMap and QGIS for Community Mapping – FOSS4G North America, April 2012
To Map an Entire Country – Where 2.0, April 2012
Mapping for Exposure with OpenStreetMap – International CrisisMappers Conference, Nov. 2011
Introduction to OpenStreetMap (workshop) – FOSS4G, September 2011
Interoperable Locations: Matching Your Places with My Places (panel) – SXSW March 2011
Data Collaboration During Crisis: Something Old and Something New – NC GIS Conference, Feb. 2011
Enabling Collaborative Analytics for Faster Answers in a Crisis – Redlands GIS Week, Feb. 2011
Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team in Haiti – International CrisisMappers Conference, Oct. 2010
Techniques of HOT (workshop) – International CrisisMappers Conference, Oct. 2010
Running GeoIQ/OpenStreetMap Together Offline – State of the Map, July. 2010
From Arkansas to Afghanistan How Open Data is Changing the World – State of the Map July 2010
Introduction to GeoCommons (workshop) – WhereCampSoCal, August 2010
Spatiotemporal Analysis for More Insightful Mobile Application Analysis – Sept. 2010

This is the first time I've given this specific talk.

Speaker

  • Kate bio pic

    Kate Chapman

    Cadasta Foundation

    Biography

    Kate leads Cadasta’s technology team and strategy. She is recognized internationally as a leader in the domains of open-source geospatial technology and community mapping, and an advocate for open imagery as a public good. Over the past 15 years she’s worked on geospatial problems of all kinds, including tracking malaria outbreaks, mapping private residences for emergency response, and even analyzing imaginary items used in geospatial games. Kate strongly believes in the mantra “people before data” which is core to her current work at Cadasta and her previous leadership of the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) as the organization’s Executive Director and co-founder. Previous to her work at Cadasta and HOT, Kate worked on the geospatial sharing portals iMapData and GeoCommons. Kate also serves on the board of the Cadasta Foundation and the OpenStreetMap Foundation.

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