A Pair Programming Workshop

*
Accepted Session
Long Form
Intermediate
Scheduled: Wednesday, June 24, 2015 from 10:00 – 11:45am in B302/303

Excerpt

Pair programming is a great way to collaborate on code and to share new ideas and techniques, but the social dynamics can be challenging. In this session, we'll talk about what works and what doesn't, and practice some techniques for better pairing!

Description

Pair programming is a great way to collaborate on code and to share new ideas and techniques, but the social dynamics can be challenging. In this session, we’ll talk about what works and what doesn’t, and practice some techniques for better pairing!

We first developed the exercises we’ll be practicing here when we were working together on a small Extreme Programming team, and realized we wanted to improve our own pairing skills. We started inventing a series of pair programming games: rules and constraints that we’d follow during short pairing sessions to concentrate on one particular aspect of good pair programming. We found them so successful that we started to share them with others!

The workshop as a whole is about one half group discussion, one half hands-on practice. Please come prepared to do some programming! If you can, bring a laptop with a working development environment. The choice of language is up to you.

Tags

pair programming, pairing, games, exercises

Speaking experience

We've done this workshop a few times (sometimes together, sometimes separately), at conferences and with private groups. So, it's far from new, but it's gotten positive reactions whenever we've done it.

Other than that: Together, we ran a refactoring workshop at Agile 2012. Moss talked about Haskell at last year's Open Source Bridge. And we've both spoken solo for things like presentations at work, usually on technical topics, to 5-35 people.

Speakers

  • Biography

    Moss lives in Boston, MA, where he works for Luminoso as a Python developer. His particular passion is working to make code so readable it invites people to use and change it. He has a growing interest in teaching development skills, and in finding ways to make the art of programming more inviting and accessible to newcomers.

    Sessions

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    Biography

    Dean is a programmer who moved from the East Coast to San Francisco, tried bouncing back and forth for a while, then gave up and accepted the idea of living in just one place (at a time) and returning to non-remote teamwork. They like to square dance and pick up new functional languages, and explain how the two are very much related.

    Sessions