Internet of Things Militia: Paramilitary Training for your IoT devices

*
Accepted Session
Short Form
Beginner
Scheduled: Thursday, June 25, 2015 from 1:30 – 2:15pm in B201

Excerpt

Security folk generally talk about how the Internet of Things is bad for security, but it also brings new sensors and connected devices that could co-operate in new and interesting ways. Could we use internet things to enhance security?

Description

Security folk generally talk about how the Internet of Things is bad for security, and indeed it is true that infrequently updated devices given access to a “trusted” home network can potential result in problems. But what about the other side? Can you train your internet light bulbs as guard dogs? Can you send your internet fridge to search and destroy invaders and that dude whose wifi signal interferes with yours? Can your thermostat help you figure out whether a network access is legitimate or not? The internet of things brings new sensors and connected devices that could co-operate in new and interesting ways, some of which may be very different from the manufacturer’s initial intent.

Tags

security, iot

Speaking experience

This is a brand new talk.

As a former academic, I used to give a lot of talks on my work to both the scientific community and more general audiences. People were often shocked that they weren't boring. ;) I also have done open source talks about my work with GNU Mailman at Linuxcon, as well as many talks geared for open source outreach, including to women in computing venues.

I have a list with many of my talk abstracts and slides here: http://terri.toybox.ca/speaking/

Speaker

  • Biography

    Terri has a PhD in horribleness, assuming we agree that web security is kind of horrible. She stopped working on skynet (err, automated program repair and artificial intelligence) before robots from the future came to kill her and then she got a job in open source, which at least sounds safer. Now, she gets paid to break things and tell people they’re wrong while working towards more secure open source and open web standards. She doesn’t get paid for her work on GNU Mailman or running Google Summer of Code for the Python Software Foundation, but she does those things too.

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