Open Hardware from Breadboard to PCB

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Accepted Session
Short Form
Beginner
Scheduled: Thursday, June 26, 2014 from 4:45 – 5:30pm in B302/303

Excerpt

So you've built a breadboard circuit with wires everywhere. What's next? A printed circuit board! I'll talk about your open hardware development options through the lens of my recent project turning a breadboard prototype into a finished Arduino shield for a curing oven at Portland State.

Description

A rocket manufacturing capstone team recently built a curing oven at Portland State. They wrote a first version of Arduino code and wired up a simple breadboard circuit so the oven worked but the department wanted them to make the oven as appliance-like as possible. The team continued on with its capstone project while I cleaned up the electronics.

I’ll walk you through the hardware development process. I made two revisions of through-hole printed circuit boards using the router at the Electronics Prototyping Lab at Portland State. Then I modified the design to interface between an Arduino and an Adafruit display shield. The final surface mount version went off to OSHPark, a locally-run PCB service.

I’ll bring all three versions of the boards and we’ll talk through what, how, and why they turned out the way they did — particularly why I used Eagle instead of the open source KiCad, when to use surface mount vs through-hole parts, the trade-offs in quality of circuit boards and when to make the jump to OSHPark, cost of components, how to navigate Mouser or Digikey as opposed to Adafruit or Sparkfun, what open source license to use, and further resources for open hardware in the Portland area.

I’m not evangelizing the Arduino, only using it as an example, so I’ll bring and briefly introduce it but you don’t have to be familiar. The talk will be friendly to complete beginners but it’s intended to be very useful to anyone with some experience building breadboard circuits who wants to take the next step.

Tags

arduino, arduino shield, printed circuit board, prototyping, hardware

Speaking experience

Gave a 45-minute grad seminar talk at Portland State, presented brief successful innovation grant proposal, and gave two-hour interactive electronics and soldering workshops for high school kids with FIRST Robotics.

Speaker

  • Jenner Hanni

    Astronics Max-Viz

    Biography

    Jenner Hanni is an electrical engineer and open hardware hacker living near Portland, Oregon. He designed the hardware and software for blended infrared and visible aircraft cameras with Astronics Max-Viz, and now he helps people get their purple printed circuit boards at OSHPark.

    Sessions

      • Title: Open Hardware from Breadboard to PCB
      • Track: Cooking
      • Room: B302/303
      • Time: 4:455:30pm
      • Excerpt:

        So you’ve built a breadboard circuit with wires everywhere. What’s next? A printed circuit board! I’ll talk about your open hardware development options through the lens of my recent project turning a breadboard prototype into a finished Arduino shield for a curing oven at Portland State.

      • Speakers: Jenner Hanni
      • Title: Math vs. Mathematics
      • Track: Chemistry
      • Room: B302/303
      • Time: 2:303:15pm
      • Excerpt:

        Most people got through their high school math classes by memorizing nonsensical statements and regurgitating them on command. If you came out of that class hating math, no one would blame you, especially not a mathematician. However, that class didn’t teach Intro to Algebra, it taught Intermediate Following Instructions.

      • Speakers: Georgia Reh, Jenner Hanni