Towards more diversity-friendly social networks

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Accepted Session
Short Form
Intermediate
Scheduled: Tuesday, June 24, 2014 from 3:45 – 4:30pm in B204

Excerpt

How can we make social networks more "diversity-friendly"? It starts with an anti-oppression attitude, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and includes the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments, and will include an annotated collection of resources on the wiki.

Description

How can we make social networks more “diversity-friendly” — that is, more welcoming to women, people of color, trans, queer and gender-variant people, and others whose perspectives are typically marginalized? It starts with an anti-oppression attitude from people running the site, embedded in the community guidelines and norms. Other key techniques include tools, technologies, and policies in areas such as moderation, muting, blocking, reporting, pseudonymity, accessibility, privacy, and user rights.

This session will look at what does and doesn’t work in a variety of online environments. Dreamwidth, Gender Overflow, the feminist and womanist blogospheres (and mailing lists before them), and others provide positive examples to learn from. Less-positive examples like Twitter’s recent blocking faux pas, the Nymwars on Google+, Google Buzz before that, Storify, and Facebook’s privacy abuses also provide valuable lessons. This session will look at what does and doesn’t work in a variety of online environments, and will include an annotated collection of resources on the wiki.

Speaking experience: Deborah and Jon have both spoken about social networks at conferences including Computers, Freedom, and Privacy conference, Data Devolution, and Politics Online (as well as on other topics at software engineering and legal conferences and workshops). This session covers new material.

Tags

diversity, social networks, community

Speaking experience

Deborah and Jon have both spoken about social networks at conferences including Computers, Freedom, and Privacy conference, Data Devolution, and Politics Online (as well as on other topics at software engineering and legal conferences and workshops). This session covers new material.

Speakers

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    Deborah Pierce

    TapestryMaker

    Biography

    Deborah Pierce is a privacy advocate and advisor to the TapestryMaker project. Previous positions include Executive Director of PrivacyActivism and Staff Attorney at EFF. She is currently finishing her first novel, The Guardian Syndrome.

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    Jon Pincus

    O.school, OPTYVA, Get FISA Right

    Biography

    Software engineer / entrepreneur / strategist / activist, currently CTO at O.School and Architect – Integrative Technologies + Communities at OPTYVA,. Previous positions include CTO and VP of Engineering roles at startups, Architect and Researcher at Microsoft Research, and leading the oppression-theory based Ad Astra project as GM of Strategy Development at Microsoft. With my activist hat on, I’ve worked with a broad coalition on Stop Real ID Now, as one of the organizers of Get FISA Right and Voter Suppression Wiki, started #p2 (the largest progressive hashtag on Twitter) with Tracy Viselli, was a board member of Bill of Rights Defense Committee, and am currently active in several Indivisible groups.

    More here

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