"M" is for Manual: Creating Documentation for your Project

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Accepted Session
Short form
Scheduled: Thursday, June 18, 2009 from 5:00 – 5:45pm in St. Johns

Excerpt

Documentation for open source projects is every bit as important as the code itself. But how can you create a single source of docs that can be used in a variety of ways and translated into other languages? This presentation will show you how.

Description

Documentation for open source projects is every bit as important as the code itself. Without documentation, users frequently get lost or frustrated. But with limited time to work on your project, how can you create a single source of docs that can be used in a variety of ways, such as in downloadable PDFs, or as searchable web content? And how can you engage with localization (translation) communities to spread your content further?

Many people are not aware of the incredible power and versatility of the documentation system known as DocBook, nor how it works. This session will cover what it is, what it isn’t, and some of flexible, useful (and in a couple cases, new and shiny) tools that exist to quickly and easily produce fantastic looking content for your users worldwide.

This presentation will cover a few basic XML tenets, DocBook XML, a couple of general-purpose libxml2 and libxslt tools, and Publican, a complete system for turning DocBook XML source into an attractive publication in any of a number of formats.

Speaking experience

Speaker

  • Frields 2

    Paul Frields

    Red Hat, Inc.

    Biography

    Paul W. Frields has been a Linux user and enthusiast since 1997, and joined the Fedora Documentation Project in 2003, shortly after the launch of Fedora. As contributing writer, editor, and a founding member of the Documentation Project steering committee, Paul has worked on a variety of tasks, including guides and tutorials, website publishing, and toolchain development. He also maintains a number of packages in the Fedora repository. In February 2008, Paul joined Red Hat as the Fedora Project Leader. He currently lives with his wife and two children in Virginia.

    Sessions