How Not to Design Like a Developer: Open Source Design

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Excerpt

Open source projects have long skimped on presentation & packaging. Let's change that. Learn how developers can create opportunities for designers to contribute to projects. Great design is the best way to draw an audience to your project & build contributor confidence.

Description

Open source projects have long skimped on presentation and packaging (basically, they are the equivalent of “she has a great personality!”). Let’s change that. Open source can be the hot girl too.

This talk covers ways in which developers can hacktivate designers (graphic, UI, UX, editorial) to work within a well-oiled workflow on open source projects. We’ll cover compelling issues around demotivation, how to teach designers to look at their output assets with version control and future iterations made by other designers in mind, and finally how to refactor with design and dev together at the table.

I’ll talk through techniques successfully used by Mozilla’s Creative Collective, including community-organizing techniques to foster their own design communities and inspire individuals to contribute to open source projects of all sizes. I’ll also cover some of the lessons we’ve learned the hard way (of course!).

Speaking experience

Speaker

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    Chrissie Brodigan

    Mozilla/Firefox

    Biography

    Don’t let the blonde hair or goofy smile, fool you. I’ve been partner to designing delightful experiences around web content & community for about a decade. Currently, I’m working along side people more awesome than myself @ Mozilla as the creative team’s lead for mozilla.com & mozilla.org (a collection of over 170 websites in more than 60 languages & always growing!). Getting to work on the Mozilla project is a daily practice of living, designing, and developing with optimism; we have a .com brain and a .org heart!

    I’m a temporarily displaced Brooklynite and pug lover/rescuer who is starting to love living in San Francisco. If I could give any advice to anyone, but especially to girls and women, I’d refer to The Diamond Age, By Neal Stephenson: “…dispense with what makes you like all the other girls and concentrate on what makes you different.”