Slower is Better

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Proposal
Short Form
Beginner

Excerpt

One of the most common reasons a team ultimately decides to develop software behind closed doors, rather than using an open-source model, is because they believe working in the open will slow them down.

And, frankly, they're right. It really does slow you down. But that is perhaps the best thing that could happen to your project.

Description

One of the most common reasons a team ultimately decides to develop software behind closed doors, rather than using an open-source model, is because they believe working in the open will slow them down.

And, frankly, they’re right. It really does slow you down.

However, it is important to understand exactly what is being slowed down. Product managers tend to think in terms of shipping new features, and so tend to deprioritize “non-features” such as reliability, security, maintainability and documentation. This is at odds with developing software in the open, which tends to give more weight to “non-feature” work.

Short-term, this feels like a real drag on productivity. But long-term, it is actually far more productive than the alternative.

Join me as I share what I’ve learned from the OpenStack community about the importance of slowing down, and the steps you can take to make sure slowing down really is better.

Tags

Process, community

Speaking experience

I've spoken at the last 3 OpenStack summmits, at my local Austin Python Users Group, as well as at several internal Rackspace events.

Recent videos:
* Thoughts on the Future of OpenStack: http://goo.gl/Ay4GZW
* OpenStack Hong Kong: http://goo.gl/oEtGhq

I have not given this talk before.

Speaker

  • Mug office square

    Kurt Griffiths

    Rackspace Hosting, Inc.

    Biography

    Kurt is a Principal Architect at Rackspace, specializing in API design, performance tuning, application security, and community building. During his career, Kurt has had the opportunity to work in a wide variety of roles in fields such as video game development, system utilities, Internet marketing, and web services.

    Kurt is currently serving as the Program Technical Lead (PTL) for the Marconi program in OpenStack.