You can be a kernel hacker

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Proposal
Short Form
Intermediate

Excerpt

Writing operating systems sounds like it's only for wizards, but it turns out that operating systems are written by humans like you and me. I'm going to tell you what a kernel is and why you should care. Then we'll talk about a few concrete ways to get started with kernel hacking, ranging from the super-easy to the terrifyingly difficult.

Description

Writing operating systems sounds like it’s only for wizards, but it turns out that operating systems are written by humans like you and me. I’m going to tell you what a kernel is and why you should care. Then we’ll talk about a few concrete ways to get started with working with the Linux kernel, ranging from the super-easy to the terrifyingly difficult.

Audience for this talk: people with some programming experience who think the Linux kernel is scary, and would like fun suggestions for better understanding how it works that don’t involve posting to LKML. There will be absurd kernel modules, barely-functional operating systems, and approachable kernel code.

The goal is not to explain how the Linux kernel development process works, but instead how to get started with the Linux kernel in a safe and fun way without being involved in that process.

See 4 paths to becoming a kernel hacker for a summary of the strategies I’ll cover.

Tags

kernel, operating systems

Speaking experience

I've spoken at PyCon Canada, PyData NYC, and am speaking at PyCon this year. I also speak pretty frequently at local user group meetups.

I gave this talk at CUSEC (http://2014.cusec.net/), and people seemed to really enjoy it. Quite a few people came up to me afterwards to say that they understand much better what kernels do and how to get started. The video is not up yet.

Video of me speaking before: http://pyvideo.org/video/2330/diving-into-open-data-with-ipython-notebook-pan

Speaker

  • Julia Evans

    Stripe

    Biography

    Julia Evans works on building models to detect fraud at Stripe. She loves taking apart systems to find how they work, making Serious Computer Programs do silly things, and organizing outreach events to make our developer communities a better place.