B302/303

Sessions for this room

Tuesday, June 20 - 10:00 AM

* The Hardest Problem in Tech(nical Interviewing) is People: The personal skills in interviewing

Technical interviews can be intimidating, but it’s easier if you have confidence in yourself and your ability to answer complicated questions. The hardest questions are not about sorting algorithms, but how you’ll work in a team, how you’ll resolve conflicts, and what it will be like to manage and work with you. This workshop exists to address the skills and theories of presenting yourself as confident, capable, and coachable.
Culture
Carol Smith, Heidi Waterhouse
Tuesday, June 20 - 01:30 PM

* Learn to Type at 250 WPM Using Open Source Tools

The Open Steno Project is dedicated to the creation of open source software, hardware, and educational materials to bring machine stenography to the masses! Want to be a speed demon typist like the court reporters you see in movies? Now you can!
Practice
Josh Lifton
Tuesday, June 20 - 02:30 PM

* In 1968 Mom built a computer: women's routes as technologists

On the surface, this story shares vignettes about my Mom. But its purpose is to increase awareness of human resources in technology, and overlooked pathways of young technologiests. "c. 1973 RCA hired her for the chip prototyping lab. Her new co-workers compared each other's crochet at lunch. A marathon week of late-night needlework bought her acceptance and promotion to supervisor. She told me stories about the ladies who wrapped wires for NASA a few years before, about women's centuries of fingers in technical fiber-crafts finally being noticed when it put men on the moon."
Culture
Katheryn Sutter
Tuesday, June 20 - 03:45 PM

* Decoding the history of codes

The word "code" means different things to different people. In this talk, we explore cryptography and how it's evolved over time. We look at some key historical events and see how the art of encryption affected our lives.
Theory
Niharika Kohli
Tuesday, June 20 - 04:45 PM

* Falsehoods Programmers Believe About (Human) Languages - Common pitfalls in interface translation

Making open source software translatable is easy, right? You just take out all the strings, put them in a translation file in your git repository, and start accepting pull requests. Simple! Well, not so fast. There’s a lot more to this than meets the eye, and if you take a quick and dirty approach you’ll end up with upset translators, complaints from users, and mysteries like “what is ١٢٬٣٤٥٬٦٧٨ and why does my code want to parse that as a number?”. Thankfully, there are open source resources and libraries that can take care of these things for you.
Practice
Roan Kattouw
Wednesday, June 21 - 10:00 AM

* microWorking Open Workshop (microWOW): Launch Your Open Project!

Getting a project off the ground is daunting, and most of us aren’t trained in project management and community building skills. At this session, Mozilla Science Lab will help you take your project from idea to reality and give you technical, project management, and community building skills to kickstart your work.
Practice
Danielle Robinson
Wednesday, June 21 - 01:30 PM

* Effective Presentations Using Applied Logical Fallacies

For many novice speakers, especially technical speakers, the hardest part of presenting is not figuring out what to put in but what to leave out. But what works for an academic paper doesn't work in a 10 minute presentation, and you risk boring your audience long before you manage to convince them of anything. This talk is intended to be a fun (and perhaps a bit silly) look at the science and the art of being convincing. I will cover how logical fallacies are used in propaganda, lying, and how you can use them to get your point across quickly. And don't worry, we'll also talk about how to do this ethically!
Practice
Terri Oda
Wednesday, June 21 - 02:30 PM

* How Can I Contribute?

This talk is for you, the documentarian, developer, student, or community member wondering what you can contribute to open source and how to get started. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you're contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request.
Culture
Lucy Wyman
Wednesday, June 21 - 03:45 PM

* Federating With The Trouble - Running Decentralized Communities

As moderators and admins of a mastodon/gnu social instance called Toot.Cat we were quickly propelled into navigating the strange new world of decentralized community stewardship.
Culture
Briar Schreiber, Lynn Cyrin, Brian Mock
Wednesday, June 21 - 04:45 PM

* Outside Looking In: Working to Reshape the Cultural Memory of Tech

This presentation talks about how the culture of technology is built around the cultural influence of those who've come first to the table. We'll look into how these narratives are made, what we can do about it, and the best ways these narratives can be challenged to make tech more open and accommodating to those on the outside.
Culture
Josh Lim
Thursday, June 22 - 10:00 AM

* You Wouldn't Reimplement an API: Lessons from Oracle v. Google

Imagine being called for jury duty and then getting forced into a Java bootcamp run by two instructors who hate each other and won’t stop saying the opposite things. Worse, both instructors are inconsistent with themselves.
Culture
Sarah Jeong
Thursday, June 22 - 11:00 AM

* Building #Resist at Meetup: Actual Corporate Activism in the Age of Trump

Learn how Meetup made the decision to create #Resist, a free network of over 1000 Meetups worldwide that anyone could organize with or join, and the questions we had to ask about how a private company could help self-empower the public in an actual way.
Activism
Yanyi .
Thursday, June 22 - 01:30 PM

* Learn the lambda calculus and be a better programmer

Come learn an ancient model of pen & paper programming in order to change how you think about code
Theory
Clarissa Littler
Thursday, June 22 - 02:30 PM

* The Existential Tester: How to Assess Risk and Prioritize Tests

To test, or not to test? That is the question. With limited time and resources there are only so many tests we can write and run. How do you determine what features of a new project to test? How do you know when a test is obsolete, or needs to be updated? What gets run per-commit, nightly, or weekly? What should you test manually? This talk will give you a framework for thinking about how to assess risk on a project and prioritize your
Theory
Lucy Wyman
Thursday, June 22 - 03:45 PM

* Create your own type system in 45 minutes

Don't let programming language designers have all the fun: you can design your own type system that is better than the current one.
Theory
Michael Ernst