B204

Sessions for this room

Tuesday, June 20 - 02:30 PM

* The Future of the Web is Low-Tech

Learn about the unexpected use cases of your online content and the technologies available to help expand the breadth of its distribution.
Practice
Eric Mann
Tuesday, June 20 - 03:45 PM

* Sustainability in Open Source for International Development

Duplication of effort, flawed funding models, and overall lack of project maturity has led to the failure of most open source projects in the international development space. In this talk, we'll discuss the plans of the Digital Impact Alliance at the United Nations Foundation to help increase those projects' maturity, quality, and reach -- with a goal of advancing an inclusive digital society using open source for the poorest places on the planet.
Activism
Michael Downey, David McCann
Tuesday, June 20 - 04:45 PM

* Starting Backwards

"topics include research, not losing your way, and not losing your mind."
Hacks
Caito Scherr
Wednesday, June 21 - 10:00 AM

* Capturing Tiny Snakes

This is intended as a tutorial session for bringing up MicroPython on a common, and reasonably easy to obtain, microcontroller platform. From bare bones, to blinking LEDs and beyond.
Hacks
John Hawley, Terri Oda
Wednesday, June 21 - 01:30 PM

* Become a Rocket Scientist With Open Source

The new space industry is expanding rapidly, with huge opportunities for open-source contributions. This talk focuses on the case study of Asterank, software that makes space data easier to access and explore. Its analysis and visualization tools have been used in government, private industry, and schools. The project has made public space data more open and usable for millions of people.
Hacks
Ian Webster
Wednesday, June 21 - 02:30 PM

* TIL There's a Microtonal Synth in My Browser!

Did you know there's a digital sound synthesizer in your browser? There is! It's called the Web Audio API and it's accessible from any JavaScript library or framework. I'll show you how I hacked Web Audio to make microtonal music in the browser.
Hacks
M Edward Borasky
Wednesday, June 21 - 03:45 PM

* SVG: So Very Good

Icon fonts! CSS-only illustrations! High-resolution GIF animations! Today's web designers still regularly and enthusiastically employ these techniques... yet they're all a better fit for SVG, a powerful vector image format that's already old enough to drive a car.
Theory
Tyler Sticka
Wednesday, June 21 - 04:45 PM

* How Open Source Audiovisual Tools Help Archivists (And You Too!)

This talk will hype several "homemade" open source video tools specific to the audiovisual digital preservation field built on broadly-used existing open source tools such as FFmpeg and mediainfo. We will discuss how these communities have grown to benefit the field of archiving and how we've grown to be able to give back to the main communities.
Practice
Ashley Blewer, Andrew Weaver
Thursday, June 22 - 10:00 AM

* #workzoneWTF: crowdsourcing policy change in PDX

Walk or ride your bike around Portland long enough and you'll come across unsafe sidewalk and road closures. To paint a clear picture of this issue, Oregon Walks and The Street Trust (BTA) ran a social media campaign collecting hundreds of photos and videos from citizens using a little tech sauce we whipped up. The pressure was on for City Hall to pass new closure requirements, which they did unanimously. This talk covers the people, the methods, and the open tech used to help move the needle.
Activism
Tim Welch
Thursday, June 22 - 11:00 AM

* Read, Write, Talk, Sing, Play: What Early Literacy Can Teach Us About Software Literacy

I'm not saying that you have to speak parentese to beginning software learners. They might be quite offended with you doing that, actually. What beginners often need, though, is not just to be set in front of a tutorial and told to come back when they're finished, but to have someone on hand to bounce questions off of or to talk them through problems and exercises so that they understand. Learners often pick up useful information by observing someone else at work using the language, but they can't just be there while you do things and learn it all by observation alone. One of the best skills a librarian has that goes mostly unnoticed is that they're really great at narrating themselves to others. When demonstrating (sometimes for the sixteenth time) how to go through a procedure to obtain resources or run searches, librarians narrate what they are doing and why. When reading a book to tiny people, youth services librarians often ask questions about what the characters are doing or feeling, so that the tiny people can use both the text and the pictures to decode what's going on in the story. Key information about the story is often communicated visually in a picture book, and sometimes in complete contradiction to the text. By providing scaffolding through narration, the librarian provides context and reasoning for the actions they're taking. By asking questions at regular intervals, the librarian can check to make sure understanding is happening and adjust to include perspectives they may not have been taking into account before. [...] Talking and explaining things to your learners, and with each other, is the best way to help them learn. So if you get the opportunity to have someone shadow you and ask you annoying questions about what you're doing and why you're doing it that way, take up the opportunity. (And request it all gets documented. Trust me.) By talking through things with someone who doesn't have your expertise, you shore up your own knowledge and help someone get more of their own. That leads to literacy.
Culture
Alex Byrne
Thursday, June 22 - 01:30 PM

* Want to own Twitter? The burgeoning Platform Cooperativism movement and what it means for you.

They have started up democratic copies of major platforms. They are building ways to better collaborate using the internet. They’re even talking about citizens buying out and protecting important internet communities like Twitter. Who are these people? They are Platform Cooperativists.
Activism
Taylor McLeod
Thursday, June 22 - 02:30 PM

* Why Is a Raven Like a Pull Request: What Writing Workshops Can Bring to Code Reviews

Many talks aimed at beginners to open source contribution assume that concepts like peer review and justification of intent are brand new. If you have ever experienced the thrills–and/or horrors–of a writing workshop, many ideas central to a successful pull request aren't that new at all. Let's talk about what experienced workshoppers and the field of writing critique can bring to your OS project.
Culture
Christine Bryant-Ryback
Thursday, June 22 - 03:45 PM

* How I Went From Newbie to Open Source Project Owner

This is the story of how focusing first on building a community of individuals who care about mentoring has allowed me to turn the idea of mentor matching for people learning to code into a multi-platform open source project.
Culture
Kim Crayton