Hacks track

What substitutions did you make to spice things up? Show us your most ingenious hacks, kludges, work-arounds, and duct-tape jobs. It doesn’t have to be elegant, it just has to work!
Hacks are clever, sometimes not. They break the rules. They force the available material into doing what you need or want. Some hacks are illegal, and some just make you proud and/or embarrassed that it worked. Sometimes a hack is the only way. Show the world how you make your hardware and software obey your every whim. Example topics from the past include “Control Emacs with Your Beard: the All-Singing All-Dancing Intro to Hacking the Kinect” and “Location-Based Hacks – How to Automate Your Life with SMS and GPS.”

Sessions for this track

* Awesome Commandline Tools

A showcase of beautifully crafted command line tools and some tips and tricks that make them so great.
Hacks
Amjith Ramanujam

* Build your own spamtrap: How to make a spam IP blacklist in 45 minutes

I show how to use Postfix, PowerDNS, Spamassassin, and Python/Flask to trap spam sent to your whole organization (and why you would want such a thing).
Hacks
Andy Schmitt

* Free Everything: Hacking Content Liberation

Large commercial websites rely on the "network effect" to keep users from exploring alternatives. Putting contributions under an open license can break this effect. This talk will explore hacks to give users control over the content they contribute to commercial websites.
Hacks
Erik Moeller

* Hardware Hula Hoops and Flow

In psychology flow is the honed in energized focus you get when performing tasks that are challenging that can be experienced in hula hooping and programming.
Hacks
Lindsey Bieda

* Pulling up Your Legacy App by its Bootstraps!

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to support an application built on an older framework. What would you do if changing the code broke everything? The application functionality is too large to be replaced in one release. What can you do? You can bootstrap it, replacing the application in sections as time allows. When all functionality is replaced, you can put your new codebase into a newer framework or a standalone application.
Hacks
Emily Stamey

* Turning Sensors into Signals: Humanizing IoT with Old Smartphones and the Web

People are already tired of the over-promise of IoT - the slew of marginally useful products, the overly confusing and crowded developer space, and endless examples of how to turn an LED on and off. Take a break, step back from the crowd, and come learn how to solve real human problems with that old phone that's collecting dust on your shelf.
Hacks
Rabimba Karanjai

Proposals for this track

* displayfs: Controlling displays remotely with a virtual filesystem

displayfs is a virtual filesystem for driving a framebuffer over a network. The primary use case is giving demos without exposing your laptop's workspace and compromising your privacy.
Hacks 2016-04-21 06:34:26 +0000
Josh Juran

* From documents to graphs

Have you ever tried to extract a relationship among the data that your documents carry? Sometimes a document-oriented model does not provide us with an appropriate structure to collect how the data is related and we need a graph. Manual replication from MongoDB to Neo4j may be painful to be done. This talk will present a tool called neo4j-doc-manager (written in Python, based on mongo-connector project!), that allows you to grab MongoDB events and mirror them to any other database.
Hacks 2016-03-21 00:46:57 +0000
Hanneli Tavante

* Hacking Clonezilla!

Clonezilla is popular for system deployment. However, there are some limitations. E.g. the destination partition must be equal or larger than the source one, the image can not be explored, etc. So any workarounds for them? Besides, are there any tips available to save system administrator's time? In this talk we will describe and demonstrate the workarounds about breaking the limitations and the tips to save time in system administration.
Hacks 2016-04-07 14:57:50 +0000
Steven Shiau, Chenkai Sun, Thomas Tsai

* InfraCloud: Running an Open OpenStack

The OpenStack Infrastructure team uses an infrastructure-as-code approach to running an OpenStack cloud that supports its automated software testing infrastructure. This talk will discuss the challenges of administering a cloud in the open and cover the tools and technologies we use to accomplish it.
Hacks 2016-04-08 18:42:38 +0000
Colleen Murphy

* Lets Get Loaded! A midi-sysex ecosystem for loading and debugging code.

In this presentation I will discuss midi, the lets get loaded framework, the open source tools used to implement it and demonstrate its use on the arduino platform.
Hacks 2016-04-21 05:32:39 +0000
Donald Davis

* Node.js, Breaking .NET, and Loving Java

In this talk I'll cover how the team (more about the team in the talk) broke the barriers of .NET to integrate with Kafka, Storm, and Zookeeper to build a streaming distributed system.
Hacks 2016-04-12 19:28:49 +0000
Adron Hall

* Securing Web by hacking!

With the right skills, tools and software, you can protect yourself and remain secure. This session will take attendees from no knowledge of open source web security tools to a deep understanding of how to use them and their growing set of capabilities.
Hacks 2016-04-16 15:46:43 +0000
Sumanth Damarla

* So You're a Full-Stack Developer, Right?

So, you think you're a full-stack developer? Let's extend that to the database, for a true full-stack experience!
Hacks 2016-04-19 03:46:22 +0000
Jerry Sievert